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University of Iowa News Release

 

May 26, 2010

At A Glance

UI offers graduate certificate in multicultural education, culturally competent practice

The University of Iowa is offering a new graduate certificate in Multicultural Education and Culturally Competent Practice. The certificate, offered for the first time this fall, is available to all students enrolled in the UI Graduate College or post baccalaureate students who wish to improve their cultural competency to enhance their practice.

This interdisciplinary program, developed by faculty in the College of Education and School of Social Work in the College of Liberal Arts and Science, features introductory and capstone courses and nine credit hours of electives that are offered throughout the university. Students gain important knowledge as they move from a basic understanding of multicultural education to a discipline-specific application of theories, completing the program with a capstone experience that allows them to demonstrate their multicultural skills within their professional practice.

Dennis R. Maki, director of the UI College of Education Office of Graduate Teaching Excellence, which administers the program, said that this certificate fulfills a significant need that was identified as the university prepares professionals to effectively serve a diverse community. Maki anticipates high demand for the program, which is limited to 25 students per semester.

For more information, call 319-335-6447, contact ogte@uiowa.edu or visit http://www.education.uiowa.edu/gte/.

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UI Children's Hospital therapist honored for work with patients' siblings

Kirsten Nelson, a music therapist at University of Iowa Children's Hospital, has received a national award for her role in founding the UI Children's Hospital's monthly sibling support group -- the Brothers and Sisters Club -- to provide outreach and education to siblings of pediatric patients.

Nelson received the Sibling STAR Partner Certification from SuperSibs!, a national non-profit organization working to support brothers and sisters of children with cancer.

Funded by a grant from the Lance Armstrong Foundation, the award honors outstanding professionals and programs making a difference for families affected by pediatric cancer.

The UI Brothers and Sisters Club is a collaboration between the Child Life Program and the Music Therapy Program at UI Children's Hospital. For more information, visit http://www.uihealthcare.com/childlife.

According to SuperSibs!, more than 18,000 children each year have brothers or sisters diagnosed with cancer. For more information about SuperSibs!, visit http://www.supersibs.org.

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Carmichael addresses Chinese dignitaries on chemical weather

Greg Carmichael, Karl Kammermeyer Professor of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering in the UI College of Engineering and co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, was recently a key speaker at the Honor Day for the MeteoWorld Pavilion at Expo 2010 in Shanghai. The international event was attended by the heads of meteorological services from more than 30 countries, as well as China's vice premier and other government officials.

The only non-governmental attendee, Carmichael spoke on "Chemical Weather -- A Challenge and an Opportunity for Service Delivery and Risk Reduction."

As chair of the Scientific Advisory group for the World Meteorological Organization's GURME project and chair of the scientific advisory group for the Shanghai Expo pilot project on air quality forecasting, he has worked with Shanghai authorities for three years to help develop an early warning system for air quality problems and heat waves. The multi-hazard early warning and management system currently is in use at Expo 2010.

Carmichael's work is reflected in a science-focused, first-of-its-kind pavilion called MeteoWorld that discusses climate change and meteorological services. The pavilion is one of Expo 2010's top 10, in terms of public interest.

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Reding chronicles Oelwein's descent in 'Methland' June 5

Nick Reding will read from "Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town" -- now out in paperback -- at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 5, in Prairie Lights, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free event will be streamed live and then archived on the University of Iowa's Writing University website, www.writinguniversity.org .

Set in Oelwein, where Reding lived off and on for four years, the book chronicles the methamphetamine epidemic as it sweeps through the American heartland. Once a railroad, meat-packing and farming hub, Oelwein was battered by the farm crisis and decimated by job losses, and meth has become the main industry.

Featured on the cover of the New York Times Book Review and listed among the year's 100 Notable Books, Methland won the 2009 Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize. The book was picked as one of the best books of the year by the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Saint Louis Post-Dispatch, the Chicago Tribune and the Seattle Times. In January 2010 the BBC purchased the global movie rights.

Reding's first book was "The Last Cowboys at the End of the World," and he has written for Harper's, Food & Wine and Outside magazines.

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Photos for At A Glance items, if available, may be found at http://www.flickr.com/photos/artsiowa/ (for arts news) or http://www.flickr.com/photos/uinews/ (for all other news).

Campus events are searchable on the UI Master Calendar: http://calendar.uiowa.edu.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. If you are a person with a disability who requires an accommodation to participate in a program, please contact the sponsoring department in advance.