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UI in the News

June 2007

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Dybek Attended Writers' Workshop (Chicago Magazine, June 2007)
An article about Stuart Dybek, the "quintessential Chicago writer," notes
that he is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. His son also graduated from the workshop.
http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/June-2007/The-Memory-Catcher/

Redlawsk Comments On Immigration Bill (Associated Press, June 30)
Online groups are taking credit for leading grass roots opposition against an immigration reform bill, saying they persuaded Americans to flood Congress with hundreds of thousands of phone calls, faxes and e-mails. "We think it was a rising tide of citizen response that forced the senators to stop and consider what the American people were saying, and what the American people were saying was they didn't like this bill," said Steve Elliott, president of Grassfire.org, headquartered in tiny Maxwell, Iowa. Such vocal groups "always want to claim responsibility" when legislation goes their way, said DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor. But they probably did play a role because they drowned out other Americans who weren't speaking up, he said. This Associated Press story was published by the WASHINGTON POST; the ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS, of Alaska; the MORNING HERALD, of Sydney, Australia; CANADIAN BUSINESS MAGAZINE; and other news outlets.
http://www.adn.com/24hour/nation/story/3650492p-13000658c.html

UI Law Professor Comments On Supreme Court Rulings (Business Week, June 29)
With controversial rulings on abortion and campaign finance, the current U.S. Supreme Court has waded into some of the most explosive issues in American politics. But there's another important emerging feature of the Court that has not drawn nearly as much attention: its sympathy to business. New justices John Roberts and Samuel Alito have the business community's stamp of approval. While some of the court's business rulings this term were decided on 5-4 votes -- notably a decision sharply confining the time in which workers must file pay discrimination claims -- those kinds of narrow splits were not typical on business matters. In fact, 12 rulings in business cases were unanimous, and most others were decided by substantial majorities, underscoring that the shift in the court has more to do with the cases being selected than the leanings of particular justices. Academics and practitioners see the Roberts Court as more pragmatic than political in the business arena. "These are not expansive cases with a lot of ideological jargon in them," says HERB HOVENKAMP at the University of Iowa College of Law about the court's business rulings. "They are fairly technical, fairly narrowly written."
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_28/b4042040.htm?campaign_id=rss_daily

Webb Acquitted In Videotaped Shooting (Los Angeles Times, June 29)
A former San Bernardino County sheriff's deputy who fired on an unarmed, off-duty Air Force police officer last year -- a videotaped shooting that drew outrage when it was aired nationwide -- was acquitted Thursday of attempted voluntary manslaughter. Ivory Webb, who played football at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was also acquitted of assault with a firearm. He faced up to an 18-year prison sentence if he had been convicted. Jurors said they were swayed more by the volatile, dangerous situation the suspects created during a high-speed chase than by the video.
http://www.latimes.com/la-me-airman29jun29,0,4383575.story?track=mostviewed-storylevel

UI Researcher Cites 'Christian Privilege' On Campus (Chronicle Of Higher Education, June 29)
As is evident in the scheduling of the academic year, the nondenominational prayers offered at commencement ceremonies and the accommodations made by dining-room meal plans, a "Christian privilege" permeates academe, said TRICIA SEIFERT, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Iowa. Seifert calls Christian privilege "the conscious and subconscious advantages often afforded the Christian faith in America's colleges and universities." The design of the academic calendar is perhaps the most obvious example of this phenomenon, she said. It is no coincidence, she writes, that campuses shut down just in time for the Christmas holiday, leaving non-Christian students forced to "negotiate conflicts between their studies and their spiritual observances." In some years, the Muslim holiday of Ramadan coincides with many campuses' week of midterm exams.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/06/2007062901j.htm

Thomas Comments On Language Anxiety (Inside Higher Ed, June 29)
The symptoms are familiar: a lack of confidence, a reluctance to speak, even insomnia in some cases. What sounds like a case of chronic stage fright could be occurring on college campuses every day, according to a growing but contested body of research about foreign language classes. It's called language anxiety. "My experience in the classroom has been that discomfort, in the most general sense, is a necessary aspect of language learning, both in the classroom and out," said DOWNING THOMAS, chairman of the Department of French and Italian at the University of Iowa. "It is even to be encouraged, both in terms of coming into contact with that which is perceived as foreign or strange and in terms of getting up the nerve to speak when one has an accent or cannot follow strict textbook grammar when speaking. This is when real learning can take place. The trick is to convince the students that discomfort is a good thing."
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/06/29/language

Alumnus Named Joint Chiefs Of Staff Vice Chairman (Navy Newsstand, June 28)
President Bush nominated Adm. Michael Mullen to serve as the next Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Marine Corps Gen. James E. "Hoss" Cartwright as his Vice Chairman on June 28. Cartwright serves as Commander, U.S. Strategic Command. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, earned his advanced degree from the Naval War College and completed a fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the president noted.
http://www.news.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=30314

Squire: No Risk In Edwards' Call To "Hardball" (The Politico, June 28)
Elizabeth Edwards said she hopes other Americans will do what she was trying to do when she confronted conservative Ann Coulter on national television this week. Edwards said people like Coulter trade in hurtful insults instead of honest debate. "At some point, somebody has to stand up and say, 'That's enough,'" she said. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor, said it's unusual for a candidate's spouse to make such a public challenge to a critic. But he said she risked little in making the call. "Certainly, among Democrats, going after Ann Coulter is not going to raise any concerns," he said. The Web site is based in Arlington, Va.
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0607/4706.html

Hovenkamp Comments On Anti-Trust Ruling (Bloomberg, June 28)
The U.S. Supreme Court, overturning a 96-year-old anti-trust precedent, said manufacturers and distributors in some circumstances can agree with retailers on minimum prices for products. The justices, voting 5-4, said the longstanding blanket ban on those accords was too rigid and that a case-by-case approach would promote competition and lead to greater consumer choice. Consumer advocates had argued that an end to the automatic ban would mean higher prices in stores. Even under the automatic ban, successful lawsuits against the practice were rare, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa. "The practical effect is minimal in terms of litigation because very few plaintiffs have been winning," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=a9zLL8gyZm5s&refer=home

UI Expert Comments On Depression Medications (KTRK-TV, June 28)
Pregnant women who might benefit from anti-depressants can take heart in a new study that suggests popular depression medications are safer for their babies than once believed. The research, however, falls short of declaring the drugs completely safe, as they may still be associated with a minutely higher risk of certain rare birth defects. The impact of the research could be far reaching, as each year as many as 400,000 pregnant women in the United States suffer from major depression. "It's a fairly reassuring article," said Dr. JENNIFER NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa. "The numbers are sufficiently small that you can't say that this is cause and effect." The station is based in Houston, Tex.
http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=health&id=5432011

IRS Rules On Research In Federally Funded Labs (Inside Higher Ed, June 28)
This week, to the satisfaction of campus officials, the Internal Revenue Service issued a ruling that clears the way for nonprofit research institutions to conduct federally sponsored studies in buildings financed with tax-exempt bonds without violating U.S. tax law. Before the ruling, institutions financed their facilities with taxable rather than tax-exempt bonds, at significantly increased costs. For instance, the University of Iowa built its Carver Biomedical Research Building with $50 million in bonds, about two-thirds of which were taxable, at interest rates up to 2 percentage points higher than the tax-exempt bonds it used. That necessity would cost the institution between $4.5 million to $6 million in present value dollars over the life of the bonds, according to a presentation that its controller, TERRY JOHNSON, gave at the Council on Governmental Relations annual meeting this month.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/06/28/bonds

Biofuel Helps UI Exceed Carbon Reduction Goals (Inside Higher Ed, June 28)
A story about colleges and universities in the U.S. that are voluntarily attempting to become carbon neutral notes that one of the schools involved is the University of Iowa. FERMAN MILSTER, associate director of utilities and energy management at Iowa, said the college has exceeded its target each year because of its biofuel program that helps displace carbon-producing coal. Faculty who specialize in related fields are being used to guide the projects there, he said. The Climate Exchange is expecting more interest from colleges as the market continues to expand. Milster said he suspects some colleges are reluctant to join because of the annual measurements and the financial repercussions that come from falling short. "That's one of the things that caused us consternation, and it took awhile to digest what membership would mean," Milster said. "There's a lot of pressure on colleges to get involved in some way. In this case, if you aren't already on track [toward immediate reduction], you should be prepared to pay."
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/06/27/ccx

Wiencek Named South Florida Dean (Tampa Bay Business Journal, June 27)
JOHN WIENCEK, current chair of the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering in the University of Iowa College of Engineering, was named dean of the University of South Florida College of Engineering after a yearlong search.
http://tampabay.bizjournals.com/tampabay/stories/2007/06/25/daily31.html

Clinton Leading, McCain Fading On IEM (TheStreet.com, June 27)
A story about online futures markets, including the Iowa Electronic Markets at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, predicting the upcoming presidential nomination winners points out that Hillary Clinton has a commanding lead in the Democratic markets and John McCain is fading fast in Republican markets.
http://www.thestreet.com/_tscrss/funds/followmoney/10365054.html

UI Researchers Help Find Scoliosis Gene (UPI, June 27)
U.S. researchers have discovered the gene that underlies scoliosis, or abnormal curvature of the spine. Among the universities that participated in the research was the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.upi.com/Consumer_Health_Daily/Briefing/2007/06/27/gene_defect_underlies_scoliosis/6972/

UI Students To Display Solar Powered Car (Rock River Times, June 27)
A story about this year's Renewable Energy and Sustainable Lifestyle Fair in Rockford, Ill., notes that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students will display a solar-powered electric car they built. The Times is published in Rockford.
http://www.rockrivertimes.com/index.new.pl?cmd=viewstory&cat=16&id=17035

UI Among Group Seeking To Reduce Carbon (Insidehighered.com, June 27)
Timothy White, president of the University of Idaho, is among a growing list of 300-plus institution leaders to sign the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, a much-publicized effort through which campuses pledge to eventually become climate neutral. White also has promised to mitigate the university's effect on global warming through membership in the Chicago Climate Exchange. And there, his academic company is far more limited. Only the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Michigan State, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tufts University and Hadlow College in Britain have agreed through this effort to reduce their carbon emissions over the next several years.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/06/27/ccx

Squire: Huckabee Campaign Short On Iowa Supporters (Washington Post, June 26)
For the last several months, the conventional wisdom surrounding former Gov. Mike Huckabee's, R-Ark., presidential bid is that while the candidate is among the best, the campaign organization is among the worst. Huckabee's two leading backers in Iowa are Bob Vander Plaats, a candidate for governor in 2002 and the lieutenant governor nominee in 2006, and former state Rep. Danny Carroll. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, praised the quality Huckabee's backers but said there just weren't enough of them. "Almost all of his competitors have organizations with much greater reach, both geographically and across the breadth of Republican interests," Squire said.
http://blog.washingtonpost.com/thefix/2007/06/huckabees_organization.html

Mason Proud Of Diversity Record (LaFayette Journal & Courier, June 26)
When SALLY MASON looks back on her years at Purdue, she said she'll be most proud of the diversity she was able to bring to the campus. Mason, who has been provost at Purdue since 2001, will become the University of Iowa's president in August. Mason said diversity helps students prepare for the real world and the kinds of people they'll have to interact with to be successful.
http://www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070626/NEWS09/70626021

UI Student Blogs Kansas City Royals Games From Cleveland (Colorado Springs Gazette, June 26)
Looking for a blog that chronicles the ups and downs of the Kansas City Royals -- one that does it live, with spunk, insight and attitude, more than 150 times a year? Look no further than Will McDonald's one-bedroom apartment in Cleveland, where the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA doctoral student painstakingly records, on his blog royalsreview.com, the comings and goings of each game. Just last week, as thousands of fans waited for his daily game thread, the 27-year-old set his laptop on a small, neat desk. He opened a live stream of the Royals' radio broadcast on his computer. He put the Cleveland Indians game, muted, on the television. Then he got to it. For the next six hours and 40 minutes, McDonald -- an Austin, Texas, native who became a Royals fan by chance and is living in Ohio -- tracked the game, bunt by bunt, hit by hit, comment by comment. Meet the new American sports fan -- an Internet-induced mix of sportswriter, play-by-play announcer, talking head and regular guy. The same story appeared on the Web sites of THE OLYMPIAN (Wash.).
http://www.gazette.com/sports/sports_24097___article.html/blog_fans.html

Gronbeck: Immigration Bill Hurts McCain With GOP (National Examiner, June 25)
Already dropping in the polls, Republican presidential candidate John McCain could fall even further this week as the Senate resumes debate on an immigration bill despised by most conservatives. "The immigration bill debate will haunt the McCain campaign until it's completed, because every time it comes up somebody will identify McCain with both George Bush and Ted Kennedy," said BRUCE GRONBECK, director of the University of Iowa's Center for Media Studies. "Those are not the bedfellows he can afford if he's going to win the nomination."
http://www.examiner.com/a-797442~McCain_campaign_gets_walloped_by_immigration_debate.html

UI Alumnus Is No. 2 Amazon Reviewer (Brainerd Daily Dispatch, June 25)
Lawrance Bernabo, who received a doctorate in rhetorical studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and teaches in Duluth, has become the number two reviewer at amazon.com. "I just always liked taking apart everything," he said, explaining his interest in critiquing a wide range of subjects. "I'm willing to dissect the Democratic national debate and I'm ready to talk about the latest comic book issue of 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer.'" The No. 1 reviewer, Harriet Klausen, is a former librarian who reviews mostly historical romances and "whose freakish speed at reviewing has caused some to wonder if she's really human." The Dispatch is published in Minnesota. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the FARGO (ND) FORUM and WCCO-TV (Minneapolis).
http://ap.brainerddispatch.com/pstories/state/mn/20070625/179904349.shtml

UI To Digitize Books With Google (Midwest Business, June 25)
Books are no longer just found in library book stacks. They can be read straight from your computer screen, too. Twelve Midwest research universities and members of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) have entered into a partnership with Google to digitize approximately 10 million bound books over the next six years. This doubles the number of universities participating in the Google Books Library Project. The universities include the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.  Midwest Business is published in Illinois.
http://www.midwestbusiness.com/news/viewnews.asp?newsletterID=17467

UI Press Publishes Poetry By Guantanamo Detainees (NPR, June 25)
A story about the book "Poetry From Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak" notes that it was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press. This is an audio file.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11354562

IEM Lets Investors Wager In Presidential Elections (Madera Tribune, June 23)
A story about futures markets notes that a number of Internet sites have already cropped up allowing the general public to speculate in these "prediction markets." Among them is the Iowa Electronic Markets, operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business school, have let players wager up to $500 on the outcome of every presidential election since 1988. Spurred by the profit motive, people bring to markets everything they know, and place their bets accordingly. That means markets, with all their chaotic buying and selling and hedging and speculation, are really very efficient mechanisms to bring together information. And all that information is revealed in one simple number -- the price. The Tribune is published in California.
http://www.maderatribune.com/news/newsview.asp?c=217829

Pomerantz Endows Opthalmology Chair (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 25)
Marvin Pomerantz has endowed a chair in ophthalmology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i43/43a04501.htm

Mason Hired As UI President (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 25)
Ending a lengthy and contentious process, the University of Iowa has hired SALLY MASON as president.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i43/43a00501.htm

Jamaican Writer To Attend UI Writing Program (Hardbeat Nets, June 25)
A 29-year-old Jamaican author and poet has been selected to participate in the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the University of Iowa. Kei Miller, whose first collection of short fiction, "The Fear of Stones," was short-listed in 2007 for the Commonwealth Writers First Book Prize, will participate in the prestigious three-month residency program from August through November.
http://www.hardbeatnews.com/editor/RTE/my_documents/my_files/details.asp?newsid=

Mason Salary Could Affect Other Leaders' Pay (WQAD, June 24)
The significant salary bump that's on deck for incoming University of Iowa president SALLY MASON could mean increased pay for leaders of the state's other universities. WQAD originates in Illinois.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6702641&nav=1sW7

Photographer Adams Is A UI Alum (Louisville Courier-Journal, June 24)
A profile of Kentucky native photographer Shelby Lee Adams notes that he holds a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070624/SCENE05/70624002/1011

Williams Comments On History Of Simmons University (Louisville Courier-Journal, June 24)
A story traces the history of Simmons University, the "Harvard of Black Kentucky." "The South was having real problems giving us classical education," explained University of Iowa professor LAWRENCE WILLIAMS, a recognized authority on the history of 128-year-old Simmons College in Kentucky, "and when they finally came across, they (funded) industrial schools. When the South decided to put dollars into education, they became normal and industrial schools" that offered teacher training and industrial education. The post-slavery era marked a time when an entire race was trying to go to school, according to Williams, both young and old. "The young wanted to learn and prepare themselves for the future. Older blacks wanted to learn to read Bible before they died."
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070624/OPINION04/706240402

UI Researches Study Tax-By-Mile Concept (Wilmington Star-News, June 24)
North Carolina is one of five states that's taking part in a two-year experiment to see how taxing by the mile rather than by the gallon might work. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers are hoping 450 residents will volunteer to be tracked by satellite and onboard computer. The system won't keep track of where they go, but only how far and in which state or locality. That way, different governments could charge different fees per mile, and the computer would keep track of it. The Star-News is published in North Carolina.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/article/20070624/EDITORIAL/706240384

UI Alumnus Is No. 2 Amazon Reviewer (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 24)
Lawrance Bernabo, who received a doctorate in rhetorical studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and teaches in Duluth, has become the number two reviewer at amazon.com. "I just always liked taking apart everything," he said, explaining his interest in critiquing a wide range of subjects. "I'm willing to dissect the Democratic national debate and I'm ready to talk about the latest comic book issue of 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer.'" The No. 1 reviewer, Harriet Klausen, is a former librarian who reviews mostly historical romances and "whose freakish speed at reviewing has caused some to wonder if she's really human."
http://www.startribune.com/people/story/1263049.html

UI Links With Indian Universities (NetIndia123, June 24)
In its bid to upgrade the standard of technical education in the state, the Bihar, India, government has chalked out a plan to join hands with several renowned universities in the US and UK. The first formal links will be with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the U.S. and the University of Edinburgh in the U.K.
http://www.netindia123.com/showdetails.asp?id=695861&cat=India&head=Bihar+universities+plan+tie%2Dup+with+reputed+foreign+universities

UI Presidential Salary Jumps (Omaha World-Herald, June 24)
The University of Iowa will pay newly appointed President SALLY MASON about $100,000 more annually than her predecessor and will offer her a salary bonus intended to keep her at Iowa at least five years.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=10059945&u_rss=1

IEM Is Leading 'Prediction Market' (International Herald Tribune, June 23)
A number of Internet sites have cropped up allowing the general public to speculate in "prediction markets." The Iowa Electronic Markets, operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business school, have let players wager up to $500 on the outcome of every presidential election since 1988.
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2007/06/24/america/NA-FEA-GEN-US-Reality-Bets.php

Grant Was Leader In Women's Sports (Wilmington Star-News, June 23)
An article on the advances in women's sports through Title IX noted the contributions by former University of Iowa women's athletic director CHRISTINE GRANT. In her 26 years as women's athletic director at the University of Iowa, Grant received numerous awards and honors, including recognition from the Women's Sports Foundation, for her work and advocacy of Title IX. She was also a founding member of the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. The Star-News is published in North Carolina.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/article/20070623/NEWS/706230320/1041/sports14

UI Physicians Assistant Program Ranked No. 1 (Advance, June 23)
U.S.News and World Report recently updated its rankings of Physicians Assistant programs for its America's Best Graduate Schools 2008 publication. The magazine ranked the PA program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA No. 1. Advance Newsmagazines originate in Pennsylvania.
http://physician-assistant.advanceweb.com/Common/editorial/editorial.aspx?CC=91004

UI Is Site Of Iowa City Jazz Festival (Jazz Police, June 23)
An article about the Iowa City Jazz Festival notes that it takes place on the Pentacrest of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Jazz Police originates in Minnesota.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/7080/79/

VanBeek Discusses Nail Health (Trinidad and Tobago Express, June 23)
MARTA J. VANBEEK, MD
, a dermatology faculty member in the University of Iowa College of Medicine discussed the myths and facts of healthy nails at an American Academy of Dermatology meeting. "Healthy, strong nails are important not just for their looks but for performing the tasks of daily life, like picking up objects," Dr. VanBeek said. "Most of us don't realize the importance of our nails until we have a problem with them. Misconceptions about nail care abound and it's important to know the facts to keep nails in top shape."
http://www.trinidadexpress.com/index.pl/article_woman_mag?id=161166667

Alumna Advanced Psychiatric Nursing (Washington Post, June 23)
Iowa City native Gwen Will, who received a nursing degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, became chief of psychiatric nursing at the National Institutes of Health and helped found Woodley House, the first psychiatric halfway house in the nation. She was also a consultant to the United Nations' expert committee on psychiatric nursing. In 1945, she became director of nursing and assistant professor at the UI.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/22/AR2007062201975.html

UI News Services Election Site Recommended (Post-Bulletin, June 23)
Columnist Mike Dougherty lauds the election Web site maintained by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA NEWS SERVICES -- http://www.uiowa.edu/election. "The neighbors to the south have lots of political action, and it's going to get busier and busier as the push toward February's Iowa caucuses nears. Check out this site from the University of Iowa News Service. It's got a range of news and links to find out what's happening in Iowa with both Democrats and Republicans. It should be one stop of many for political junkies." The Post-Bulletin is published in Rochester, Minn.
http://news.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?a=298422&z=41

Olshansky Serves On Advisory Board (Macroworld Investor, June 22)
BRIAN OLSHANSKY
, an internationally known electrophysiologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals, will serve on the Scientific Advisory Board of BioControl, a developer of advanced implantable devices for the treatment of autonomic disorders. Macroworld Investor is a publication of Wachovia Corp.
http://www.macroworldinvestor.com/m/m.w?lp=GetStory&id=258809131

Visin Comments On Information Requests (Clarion Ledger, June 22)
Many college police departments post daily reports online, including names, and will respond to requests for information about people. DAVID VISIN with the University of Iowa police said his department responds to information requests daily, mostly on ex-students who are applying for sensitive government jobs or the military. The Clarion-Ledger is published in Mississippi.
http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070622/FEAT05/706220323/1023

Sauder Researched Law School Rankings (Law.com, June 22)
University of Iowa sociologist MICHAEL SAUDER, who has interviewed more than 120 law professors and administrators while researching law school rankings, heard examples of alumni taxi drivers who are "employed" for the purposes of U.S.News rankings. The article originally appeared in the American Lawyer magazine.
http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1182330351869

UI Art Building West Wins Award (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 22)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA art building that extends out over a quarry pond has won another award for its lead designers, Steven Holl Architects. The facility, Art Building West, won a 2007 Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects in January. Now the Royal Institute of British Architects has honored the building with a 2007 International Award.
http://chronicle.com/blogs/architecture/125/art-building-at-u-of-iowa-wins-royal-institute-award

DI Reportage Cited (U.S.News and World Report, June 22)
Alcohol is linked to bad decisions over time, the University of Iowa's DAILY IOWAN reports. Researchers, however, did not go so far as establishing a causal relationship: "It's unclear what comes first: the binge drinking or the bad choices."
http://www.usnews.com/blogs/paper-trail/2007/6/22/iowa-really-doesnt-want-you-to-drink.html?s_cid=rss:iowa-really-doesnt-want-you-to-drink.html

Hancher Presents Joffrey Ballet (Omaha World-Herald, June 22)
Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan declared July 1 "A Day of Dance with the Hancher Auditorium and the Joffrey Ballet." The proclamation was made in honor of the Joffrey Ballet's performance that day in the city's recently renovated Bayliss Park. The company's stop in Council Bluffs is part of its "River-to-River" tour through Iowa, which was arranged to celebrate the 35th anniversary of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HANCHER AUDITORIUM.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2620&u_sid=10057911&u_rss=1

Iowa Presidency Eludes South Carolina's Becker (The State.com, June 22)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA trustees elected Purdue University Provost Sally Mason as president from among a slate of four finalists that had included University of South Carolina Provost Mark Becker. Becker, 48, has been USC's executive vice president for academic affairs for about three years. Becker said when the finalists were announced that he had been approached by Iowa's representatives about applying for the Iowa position. The State is published in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/123/story/98856.html

Centenarian Ping Ponger Is UI Alumnus (St. Petersburg Times, June 21)
Pneumonia had set in on his centenarian body. Days in the hospital segued into weeks. Hospice was paged. Doctors even asked his wife about her thoughts on removing life support, if it came to that. Forget it, Marian Donnelly said. If those doctors really knew her spouse of six years, they'd understand it didn't matter how medically far up the creek he was. John Donnelly possessed an abundance of paddles. Many suggest they've kept him going for years. They've navigated him to Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Kansas City, even to Jay Leno's sofa. Today, five months after that extended hospitalization, they've led him to Kentucky. "I'm not so good anymore," said Donnelly, believed to be the nation's oldest table tennis aficionado. "But I'm pretty good for my age." Fact is, the Iowa native is in a league of his own -- albeit by default. When the 2007 Summer National Senior Games commence today in Louisville, Donnelly will be the lone table tennis competitor in the 100-150-plus age bracket. "The last time 2005 it was in Pittsburgh, and nobody was in my age bracket then either, " said Donnelly, who turns 101 on Sept. 23. "The nearest age bracket that had anybody in it was 80-85, and I came in second." Donnelly started playing while growing up in Burlington, IA, then continued to play while a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/06/21/Features/At_100___he_battled_b.shtml

Purdue Provost Sally Mason Lands Iowa Post (The Indianapolis Star, June 21)
SALLY MASON
wasn't brought up around higher education, but she plans to make herself right at home as the University of Iowa's new president. "I already feel that I am part of this University of Iowa community," the 57-year-old Mason said after the state Board of Regents announced her selection today. Mason, a biology professor and provost at Purdue University, has impressive credentials, including a Ph.D. in cellular, molecular and developmental biology from the University of Arizona. But, what may be most impressive about her rise through academia is that she was the first in her family to earn a college degree.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2007706200528

Purdue Provost Named New Iowa President (The News-Sentinel, June 21)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S newly selected president is Sally Mason, a biology professor and provost at Purdue University. Mason, who becomes the school's 20th president, replaces David Skorton, who left last summer to become president of Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. She will assume her new post on Aug. 1. The News-Sentinel is published in Fort Wayne, Ind.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/news/local/17401507.htm

First In Family With Degree, Now Iowa President (WTHR.com, June 21)
SALLY MASON wasn't brought up around higher education, but she plans to make herself right at home as the University of Iowa's new president. "I already feel that I am part of this University of Iowa community," the 57-year-old Mason said after the state Board of Regents announced her selection on Thursday. WRHR 13 is located in Indianapolis, Ind.
http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=6693933&nav=menu188_2

Former KU Dean To Lead Iowa University (Lawrence Journal-World, June 21)
SALLY FROST MASON
, former dean of Kansas University's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, is expected to be named the University of Iowa's new president, the Des Moines Register reported Wednesday. Sources close to the university said the Iowa Board of Regents would vote on and announce Mason's selection today. Mason, 57, made a $321,900 salary as Purdue University provost, a job she has held since 2001. She left KU that year after 21 years as an administrator and biology professor.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/jun/21/former_ku_dean_lead_iowa_university/

Effort Behind UI Press Guantanamo Poetry Is A Story (KWQC-TV, June 21)
The story behind a book of poetry from Guantanamo detainees could be as compelling as the poems themselves. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press will release "Poems From Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak" in August. It features 22 poems by 17 detainees. Marc Falkoff, an attorney who represents 18 detainees, says it was a "long and draining project." KWQC TV 6 serves The Quad Cities area. This was part of an ASSOCIATED PRESS story that was also picked up by THE MIAMI HERALD and multiple other media outlets.
http://www.kwqc.com/Global/story.asp?S=6691966&nav=menu83_2

Researcher Authors Study On Blacks, Heart Attack Treatment (WAVY-TV, June 21)
A study of heart attack patients released late Tuesday afternoon suggests not every patient is treated equally. Doctors reviewed the records of one million Medicare patients and found for every 10 white patients who received specialized care -- only seven blacks do. Right after a heart attack, patients often need open-heart surgery or a procedure called angioplasty to open blocked arteries. But this study of patients between 2000 and 2005 shows not everyone is receiving this important specialized treatment. The study will appear in tomorrow's Journal of the American Medical Association. JAMA provided us with a taped interview from the study author, Dr. IOANA POPESCU of the University of Iowa. WAVY-TV News 10 is based in Hampton Roads, Va. and is part of the FOX News Network.
http://www.wavy.com/Global/story.asp?S=6649070&nav=23ii

UI's Olshansky Chosen For Scientific Advisory Board (Forbes, June 21)
BioControl Ltd. (http://www.biocontrol-medical.com/), developer of advanced implantable devices for the treatment of autonomic disorders, announced today the composition of its Scientific Advisory Board. The six prestigious members who will advise the company on its scientific direction and clinical research initiatives are Professors William C. Little, BRIAN OLSHANSKY, Milton Packer, Hani N. Sabbah, Peter Schwartz, and Karl Swedberg. Olshansky is a tenured Professor of Medicine and internationally known electrophysiologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals where he directed the Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology and the Fellowship Training Program for six years. Dr. Olshansky has been recognized globally for his expertise.
http://www.forbes.com/businesswire/feeds/businesswire/2007/06/21/businesswire20070621005311r1.html

Polls Show Support For McCain Falling (Miami Herald, June 21)
Sen. John McCain was the one-time front-runner for the Republican presidential nomination. New polls this week showed support plummeting in two key early-voting states. He is tied for fifth place in Iowa, with 6 percent. He fell to fourth place in South Carolina, with 7 percent. He apparently has not captured the imagination of many Republican voters. "On immigration, when Ted Kennedy's your best friend, that's a problem," said BRUCE GRONBECK, the director of the University of Iowa's Center for Media Studies and Political Culture.
http://www.miamiherald.com/515/story/146404.html

UI And Kansas University Medical Schools Compared (DeSoto Explorer, June 21)
Kansas University Medical Center (KUMC) officials on Tuesday rallied support behind its $800 million, 10-year plan to become a major player in life sciences research and care. KUMC executive vice chancellor Barbara Atkinson said improvements in life sciences research in the region would benefit all Kansans. Kansas University (KU) hopes to hire 244 more faculty and add 862,500 square feet of space over the next 10 years at a cost of $800 million. Kinson said Kansas has to partner up in order to grow. For example, she said that KU's medical school ranks 81st out of 125 medical schools in National Institutes of Health funding. That $45 million in NIH funding last year had an economic impact of $1.3 billion statewide, Atkinson said. By comparison, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school ranked 30th in NIH funding with $137 million. That had an economic impact of $4.1 billion. The newspaper is based in Kansas. A similar article appeared in the WICHITA BUSINESS JOURNAL WORLD in Kansas.
http://www.desotoexplorer.com/section/news/story/8361

Slatton Serves On NCAA Committee (Rocky Mountain News, June 21)
BONNIE SLATTON
, professor of physical education and sport science at the University of Iowa, was a member of the NCAA infractions committee that imposed penalties on the University of Colorado athletics program.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/ncaa/article/0,2777,DRMN_23932_5596619,00.html

Hatcher Comments On Choral Festival (San Luis Obispo Tribune, June 21)
WILLIAM HATCHER
, who conducted choral groups for many years in the University of Iowa School of Music, commented on judging the competition at the California International Choral Festival: "This is not just like listening to a recording. You're watching them. You're aware of their energy."
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/ticket/story/73737.html

Dorfman Responds To Guantanamo Poems (The Independent, June 21)
Ariel Dorfman writes, "Three decades ago, when I was living in exile and my country, Chile, was being devastated by a dictatorship, I met a woman who had been arrested by Pinochet's secret police and tortured in a cellar in Santiago. It was poetry, she told me, which allowed her to survive. It is shameful and yet also wondrous that I immediately evoked the woman as soon as I read the poems from the prisoners at Guantanamo. Shameful because it is the United States, supposedly a democracy, that is treating its detainees in the same brutal manner that dictatorial Chile and countless other desolate governments across the planet have treated their own captives." The article was extracted from an afterword to be published next month with "Poems from Guantanamo" from the, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The Independent is published in the U.K.
http://comment.independent.co.uk/commentators/article2686788.ece

UI Athletes Invented Trampoline (ArriveNet, June 20)
In 1934 the first trampoline as we know it was built by George Nissen who was a gymnastics and diving competitor and Larry Griswold who was a tumbler on the gymnastic team, both at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://editorials.arrivenet.com/health/article.php/11934.html

Guantanamo Poems To Be Published (Reuters, June 20)
Poems written by Guantanamo prisoners about their lives as captives of the United States have been compiled in a book that will be published this summer with an endorsement from a former U.S. poet laureate. "Poems From Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak" is being published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and will hit the shelves by August, the publisher said. The 84-page volume was assembled by lawyers representing captives held as suspected terrorists at the much-criticized U.S. Navy base in Cuba. The article also appeared on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES and the WASHINGTON POST; a similar article appeared in the INDEPENDENT in Great Britain.
http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=entertainmentNews&storyid=2007-06-20T224045Z_01_N6K284505_RTRUKOC_0_US-GUANTANAMO-POEMS.xml

Thomas Comments On Guantanamo Poetry Book (Yahoo! News, June 20)
"Poems from Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak," published by University of Iowa Press, includes 22 works by 17 prisoners at the U.S. naval prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. "We thought it was very important to be published," said ALLISON THOMAS, publicist of University of Iowa Press, which will publish 5,000 copies of the book in August. "We feel that the University of Iowa Press is fulfilling the core responsibility of all university presses: promoting lively engagement with ideas and, in doing so, contributing knowledge to the informed public on which a democracy depends," she told AFP. The article was issued by AGENCE FRANCE-PRESS news agency and also appeared in the TURKISH PRESS.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070620/ennew_afp/entertainmentusattacks_070620214019

UI Press To Publish Guantanamo Prisoner Poems (Wall Street Journal, June 20)
Inmates at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, used pebbles to scratch messages into the foam cups they got with their meals. When the guards weren't looking, they passed the cups from cell to cell. It was a crude but effective way of communicating. The prisoners weren't passing along escape plans or information about future terrorist attacks. They were sending one another poems. For years, the U.S. military refused to declassify the poems, arguing that inmates could use the works to pass coded messages to other militants outside. But the military relaxed the ban recently and cleared 22 poems by 17 prisoners for public release. An 84-page anthology titled "Poems From Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak" will be published in August by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Press, giving readers an unusual glimpse into the emotional lives of the largely nameless and faceless prisoners there.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118217520339739055.html?mod=world_news_featured_articles

UI Plans To Increase Medical School Enrollment (Omaha World-Herald, June 20)
For the first time in three decades, the University of Nebraska's medical school will increase the number of doctors it trains to respond to the forecast of a nationwide physician shortage. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Creighton University also will increase medical school enrollment this fall. The increases aren't huge, but they reflect efforts by Nebraska and Iowa schools to answer a call by the Association of American Medical Colleges for 30 percent more total enrollment at the country's medical schools by 2015. The association says the nation needs more doctors because of population increases, a doubling of the number of people over age 65 by 2030, and an aging physician workforce.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=10055473&u_rss=1

NIH Funding For UI Medical School Noted (Lawrence Journal-World, June 19)
Kansas University Medical Center unveiled an $800 million, 10-year plan to become a major player in life sciences research and care, but a key state lawmaker expressed dissatisfaction. House Speaker Melvin Neufeld said the plan was too focused on the Kansas City metropolitan area. KUMC Executive Vice Chancellor Barbara Atkinson said improvements in life sciences research in the region would benefit all Kansans. "What helps the Kansas City region helps the whole state of Kansas," she said. Atkinson said KU's medical school ranks 81st out of 125 medical schools in National Institutes of Health funding. That $45 million in NIH funding last year had an economic impact of $1.3 billion statewide, Atkinson said. By comparison, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school ranked 30th in NIH funding with $137 million. That had an economic impact of $4.1 billion. The paper is based in Lawrence, Kans.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/jun/19/800m_life_science_plan_hatched/?city_local

Fossil Skull Shows Giant Panda Was Once Pygmy (The Times of London, June 19)
A fossilized skull of the earliest giant panda has been discovered and reveals that two million years ago the animal was a pygmy. It is the first skull of the extinct species to be found and provides a clear idea of what the ancient creature would have looked like. The skull of Ailuropoda microta, meaning pygmy giant panda, was discovered in a cave in Leye, southeast China, and it has helped scientists from China and the United States to draw up the giant panda's family tree. RUSSELL CIOCHON, professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa, said: "Pandas are unique bears -- the only bear species that is known to exist wholly on a vegetarian diet."
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/article1951231.ece

Ciochon Comments On Giant Panda Ancestor (Hong Kong News, June 19)
The earliest known ancestor of the giant panda that lived in south China some two million years ago was pygmy-sized, according to a recent finding of a skull by a team of American and Chinese anthropologists. According to Professor RUSSELL CIOCHON, a University of Iowa anthropologist, the ancient panda (formally known as Ailuropoda microta, or "pygmy giant panda") was probably about three feet in length, compared to the modern giant panda, which averages in excess of five feet in length. Ciochon said the skull, about one-half the size of a modern-day giant panda skull, but anatomically very similar, indicated that these animals had evolved for more than three million years as a separate lineage apart from other bears and was adapted to eating bamboo very early in their development. "Pandas are unique bears -- the only bear species that is known to exist wholly on a vegetarian diet," said Ciochon.
http://www.hongkongnews.net/story/257809

Pygmy Giant Panda Remains Discovered (The Telegraph, June 19)
The remains of a "pygmy giant panda" have been discovered in a cave, revealing how the creatures have munched bamboo for more than two million years. An American anthropologist and his colleagues in China report the first discovery of a skull from the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda that lived in south China some two million years ago. The ancestor really was a pygmy, says Professor RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa, co-author of an article published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The newspaper is based in England.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/06/19/wpanda119.xml

Panda Skull Discovery Noted (Bloomberg, June 19)
China's black and white pandas are living fossils. All they've done in the past 2 million years is grow a little, a new study shows. The ancient panda was about three feet (1 meter) long, or half the size of today's giant panda, according to a study of a skull found in a cave in southern China. Aside from size, the bear's basic anatomy has hardly changed, researchers said in a study published in the online edition of the June 18-22 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The panda's ancestor, Ailuropoda microta, "was very similar to the living giant panda in both the makeup of its teeth and the shape and construction of its skull," said RUSSELL CIOCHON, professor of anthropology at the University of Iowa and one of the study's authors, in a response to e-mailed questions. "Pandas have been 'uniquely pandas' for many millions of years."
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601090&sid=a6.sLjCm4tVY&refer=france

Libraries Gather Nancy Drew Author Materials (Republican American, June 19)
In 1980,the world learned just who Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, author of 23 of the first 25 Nancy Drew mysteries under the pen name Carolyn Keene, really was. What struck many were the similarities between the author and her gutsy, independent heroine. Benson was a born adventurer who traveled by dugout canoe to explore archaeological sites in Central America. She was the first woman to receive a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She published her first book while she was a student at the University of Iowa. In honor of the new Nancy Drew movie's release, the university's libraries gathered her scrapbooks, correspondence, photographs, and early writings into a single digitized collection at: http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/mwb/. The newspaper is based in Waterbury, Conn.
http://www.rep-am.com/story.php?id=25706

Squire: Straw Poll Hurt By McCain, Giuliani Absences (The Politico, June 18)
In the course of a week, the Ames straw poll went from a closely watched early test of the Republican presidential campaigns in the leadoff caucus state to a face-off between mostly lesser-known candidates. Decisions by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Arizona Sen. John McCain to skip the high-profile Iowa Republican Party fundraiser could signal the end of the mid-August event's relevance. That could reduce the amount of money the state GOP will have for its campaigns next year and prompt questions about whether Iowa's influential role setting the tone for the presidential nominating campaign is slipping. "This is a huge blow to the straw poll and to the Iowa GOP," said University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE. The publication is based in Arlington, Va.
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0607/4519.html

Giant Panda Ancestor Not So Giant (BBC News, June 18)
A fossilized skull found in south China revealed the ancient animal, known as Ailuropoda microta, was about half the size of today's giant panda. However, the "pygmy" bear, which lived about two million years ago, shows strong similarities to modern pandas and also lived on a bamboo diet. RUSSELL CIOCHON, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa, U.S., and an author on the PNAS paper, said: "Pandas have unique skulls, so to have the whole skull with all of the upper dentition means we can see very much what the animal looked like."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6764365.stm

Ancestor Of Giant Panda Was Pygmy-Sized (Scientific American, June 18)
About 2 million years ago, in lowland tropical forests of what is now China, lived an ancestor of the giant panda that was very similar to the famed vegetarian bear except about half the size, scientists said. Writing on Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the scientists described a complete skull and teeth of a pygmy-sized panda, shedding light on the origins of this unique, bamboo-munching bear. The extinct bear, named Ailuropoda microta, is the earliest known member of the panda lineage, said RUSSELL CIOCHON, a University of Iowa anthropologist and one of the researchers. "It's basically a miniaturized version of the living panda," Ciochon said in a telephone interview. "Before, we only had teeth of this pygmy giant panda, just some isolated teeth. So we knew it existed, but we had no idea what the skull was like." The article appeared on the REUTERS newswire and the website of the AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING COMPANY.
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?alias=extinct-ancestor-was-pygm&chanId=sa003&modsrc=reuters

Ciochon Discovers Skull of Panda Ancestor (Washington Post, June 18)
The first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda was been discovered in China, researchers report. Discovery of the skull, estimated to be at least two million years old, is reported by RUSSELL L. CIOCHON in Tuesday's edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Ciochon, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa, and a team of U.S. and Chinese researchers, made the find in a limestone cave in south China. The animal, formally known as Ailuropoda microta, or "pygmy giant panda," would have been about three feet long, compared to the modern giant panda, which averages in excess of five feet. Previously this animal had been known only by a few teeth and bones, but a skull had never been found. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES, SINA in China, TIME, MSNBC, NEWSDAY in New York, INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, PHILADELPHIA ENQUIRER, CNN, and many other publications worldwide.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/18/AR2007061801069.html

Oldest Panda Skull Discovered (Science Magazine, June 18)
With its cuddly physique and black saucer eyes, the panda may be the most famous exotic animal in the world. But surprisingly little is known about the creature's evolutionary history. That may change, thanks to the discovery of the oldest panda skull yet found. Among other insights, the two-million-year-old fossil indicates that pandas have been tucking into bamboo for a very long time. The fossil skull was discovered six years ago in a limestone cave in southern China by two paleontologists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing. The teeth and the shape of its bones indicate that the owner was a precursor of the modern giant panda, says anthropologist RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa.
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2007/618/2

Panda Skull Reveals Pygmy Ancestor (National Geographic.com, June 18)
A fossil skull representing the earliest known species of panda has been discovered in China, researchers report. The find shows that small-bodied, "pygmy" ancestors of the modern giant panda were present in the forests of southern China at least two to three million years ago. "One can call the fossil species the 'pygmy giant panda,'" said RUSSELL CIOCHON of the University of Iowa. "It really is a miniaturized version of the living giant panda." The new fossil proves that pandas' dietary preference for bamboo evolved quite early, Ciochon said. "The panda lineage has been evolving for several million years totally separated from their traditional bear ancestry," he added.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/06/070618-panda-fossil.html

Veterinarians Could Be First To Get Bird Flu (Washington Post, June 18)
Because veterinarians who work with birds are at increased risk of infection with bird flu viruses, they should be included on lists of people with priority access to pandemic flu vaccines and antiviral drugs, U.S. researchers say. A team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH analyzed blood samples from a group of American veterinarians who worked with chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese or quail. They found that their blood had increased levels of antibodies against the H5, H6 and H7 avian influenza viruses. These increased levels indicated that the veterinarians had previously been infected by these viruses. "Veterinarians and others with frequent and close contact to infected birds may be among the first to be infected with a pandemic strain of influenza," study author Kendall Myers, a doctoral student in occupational and environmental health, said in a prepared statement.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/18/AR2007061800624.html

UI Press Volumne Lauded (ForeWord, May-June issue)
In an article identifying the best new poetry books, "Primary Care: More Poems by Physicians," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is described as an "excellent anthology of fifty-two physicians who have found an outlet for reflection in writing after hours. Their poems examine decisive life moments shared between physician and patient -- and times when the physician struggles to make sense of what's transpired."
http://www.forewordmagazine.com/articles/shw_article.aspx?articleid=212

Holl Wins RIBA Award For Art Building West (Interior Design, June 18)
The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the recipients of its annual RIBA International Awards recognizing excellent architectural work conceived by RIBA members around the world. On June 22, winning designs will be showcased and winner feted at the RIBA National and International Awards Dinner. Steven Holl Architects has received two of the eight awards for two critically acclaimed projects: The New Residence at the Swiss Embassy and the School for Art & Art History at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Interior Design originates in New York. This story was also covered by the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://www.interiordesign.net/id_newsarticle/CA6452434.html

Achepohl Collection Shown (Fibre2Fashion, June 18)
An unusual collection of Turkish textiles will be publicly shown for the first time beginning June 22 at Grinnell College's Faulconer Gallery. "Felted, Woven, Embellished: Turkish Textiles from a Private Collection" features 41 textiles from the personal collection of KEITH ACHEPOHL, retired professor of art at the University of Iowa. Achepohl, who taught printmaking at the UI for more than 30 years, was himself the focus of a solo exhibition at the Faulconer Gallery in 2004. Fibre2Fashion originates in India. This news also appeared in a textile magazine in Bahrain.
http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/textile-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=36589

Bell Comments On Sextuplets (ABC, June 17)
Sextuplets are rare, so it was news when two sets of septuplets were born in the United States only 10 hours apart. Unfortunately the deliveries were so premature that the survival prospects of the infants are slight. "There's a small amount of room for hope that at least one of the babies might survive," University of Iowa pediatrics professor Dr. EDWARD F. BELL told the Minnesota Star Tribune about one of the sets. "There's a handful of 22-week old babies have survived, but it is a rare event."
http://www.abcnews.go.com/Health/story?id=3286009&page=1

Regents Meet But Make No Selection (Indianapolis Star, June 17)
The Iowa Board of Regents met but adjourned without selecting a new president for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Similar stories ran in other Indiana media.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070617/LOCAL/70617008

Squire Discusses Romney Surge (CBS, June 17, from Christian Science Monitor)
GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is now running first in Iowa and New Hampshire polls. John McCain and Rudy Giuliani may have insulted the party faithful of Iowa by declining to participate in the straw poll. "I suspect there will be a bit of a backlash, probably not too much, but it certainly didn't improve their prospects," says PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/15/politics/main2933628.shtml

Farmetrics Is Based On IEM (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, June 17)
Grain company Bunge Limited has set up a Web site that uses individual farmers' knowledge to forecast how the country's crops will perform. Farmetrics functions like the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA started in 1988 to predict the winners of presidential elections. The Fort Wayne Journal Gazette is published in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/business/17382538.htm

Forkenbrock Heads Tax Study (News-Observer, June 17)
North Carolinians are driving more miles every year, but they're buying less gas. Although better fuel economy sounds great for the pocketbook and good for the planet, it spells trouble for reliance on gas-tax money to finance transit and highway needs. A new study will consider taxing by the mile, not by the gallon. "In the old days, when cars got 13 or 14 miles to a gallon, we were pretty flush with cash," said DAVID J. FORKENBROCK of the University of Iowa Public Policy Center. "But we're already seeing major drops in the revenues coming in. We know it's going to get worse." Forkenbrock will oversee the Road User Charge Study in North Carolina and five other states.
http://www.newsobserver.com/news/story/607113.html

Robinson's 'Gilead' Cited (St. Petersburg Times, June 17)
Scott Montgomery wrote, in a column about religious faith, "I stopped in a bookstore and stumbled on the novel 'Gilead,' by MARILYNNE ROBINSON. The first sentence is about a dying man writing to his son. I kept reading. The man is the Rev. John Ames, a Congregationalist minister who married late in life and now, in his late 70s and with a bad heart, is about to leave behind a young wife and very young son. The book is his letter to the boy. The novel, which won a Pulitzer Prize, turned out to be a kind of minister's guide to life. But in a richer, more satisfying way than it sounds. Robinson is no mere fiction writer. A teacher at the University of Iowa's famous writing program, she's a church deacon and a fierce religious intellectual. What she did with 'Gilead' was write a book that celebrates the beauty of mystery in living, and in a thoroughly convincing way conveys the revelatory power and joy in acknowledging things beyond our comprehension." The St. Petersburg Times is published in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com/2007/06/17/Floridian/God_and_the_father.shtml

Benson Wrote Nancy Drew Books (Bozeman Daily Chronicle, June 17)
A story about two Montana scholars' interest in Nancy Drew notes that "Mildred A. Wirt Benson, the first woman to graduate with a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a longtime reporter for the Toledo Blade newspaper in Ohio, wrote many of the Nancy Drew books."
http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/articles/2007/06/16/news/000drew.txt

UI Press Book Reviewed (Kultur Kompasset, June 16)
Critic Henning Hoholt called the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS book "Czech Theater Design in the Twentieth Century," "a stimulating compilation of essays and images, which reveals an essential and valuable component of Czech contributions to the world of modern theatre." Kultur Konpasset originates in Norway.
http://www.kulturkompasset.no/index.php?AID=713&TID=8

Benson Was The Real Carolyn Keene (Globe and Mail, June 16)
Who was the real Carolyn Keene, author of the Nancy Drew mysteries? The Stratemeyer Syndicate launched the Hardy Boy mysteries in 1927. In 1930, Stratemeyer sold publisher Grosset & Dunlap on the idea of a new series featuring a girl detective. He employed 24-year-old Iowan journalist Mildred Wirt to write up the first three plots he had devised. Wirt continued to write the titles and, as the main writer on numbers one to seven and 11 to 25, she has perhaps the strongest claim to be identified as the real Carolyn Keene. Wirt, known as Mildred Wirt Benson after her second marriage, dropped out altogether in the 1950s to be replaced by other writers. After a Nancy Drew conference at Wirt's alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in 1993, all parties became more open about the authorship of the books. The contributions of Wirt, who was still working as a journalist at her death at 96 in 2002, are acknowledged in some new editions. The Globe and Mail is published in Toronto, Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20070616.DREWAUTHOR16/TPStory/TPEntertainment/?query=

UI Hosted First Nancy Drew Conference (LA Daily News, June 15)
Burbank, Calif., is hosting its second Nancy Drew Conference, but the first was held in 1993 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dailynews.com/glendale/ci_6144998

Atchison Comments On Premature Death Study (KARE TV, June 15)
Where you live may help determine how long you live, with residents of the lowest-ranking five states dying prematurely at a rate twice that of those in the top-ranked five. "This does as good a job as any report I've seen in bringing in a range of both acute and preventative measures in trying to assess the performance of the health services system for the state," says CHRISTOPHER ATCHISON, associate dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa. Iowa scored high, he suspects, for a variety of reasons, including efforts by hospitals and doctors in the state to work together to promote quality efforts. He also says most residents are within 25 miles of a hospital and that the state is fairly homogenous. It also has a high percentage of residents who have health insurance coverage. KARE is located in the Twin Cities.
http://www.kare11.com/news/health/health_article.aspx?storyid=257533

Atchison Comments On Premature Death Study (KARE TV, June 15)
No official tally of business subsidies exists, but in separate studies PETER S. FISHER of the University of Iowa and Kenneth F. Thomas of the University of Missouri estimated that state and local subsidies aimed at creating jobs total about $50 billion annually. The Gainesville Sun is published in Florida.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/06/15/america/15Goodlife.php

Schmidt Declares Importance Of Intelligence (American Executive, June 15)
What makes CEOs and their teams successful? Professors FRANK SCHMIDT of the University of Iowa and John Hunter of Michigan State University, declare that intelligence determines occupational performance better than any other ability, trait or disposition -- even better than job experience.
http://redcoatpublishing.com/features/f_06_07_Leadership.asp

UI Studied Ag Pollution (Omaha World-Herald, June 15)
Federal and university air quality scientists Thursday launched the first nationwide study of air emissions from feeding operations for hogs, dairy cattle and poultry. Environmental activists have for years criticized large livestock-feeding operations as potential air polluters. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in 2002 reported that more than 25 percent of workers at such operations report serious respiratory problems.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1208&u_sid=10042945&u_rss=1

Squire Comments On Republican Presidential Candidates (Miami Herald, June 15)
In Iowa, polls are harder to decipher than in New Hampshire, because with caucuses - the state's nominating vehicle, which typically attract only the most dedicated voters - it's more difficult to predict who will turn out. Still, analysts take seriously the fact that Mitt Romney shot into the Republican lead last month in the Des Moines Register poll with 30 percent, ahead of John McCain and Rudy Giuliani (18 and 17 percent). The latter two subsequently announced they would not take part in the traditional Iowa straw poll in August, a nonbinding event that in the past has winnowed the Republican field. McCain and Giuliani say they will still compete in the Iowa caucuses, but there's a risk that in snubbing the straw poll, a fundraiser for the state GOP, they have insulted the party faithful of Iowa. "I suspect there will be a bit of a backlash, probably not too much, but it certainly didn't improve their prospects," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.miamiherald.com/692/story/139915.html

Ohio State To Have Secret Presidential Search (Columbus Dispatch, June 15)
The trustee in charge of the presidential search process at Ohio State University has said the search must be secret because some candidates won't allow themselves to be considered if the search is public. It doesn't have to be that way, said Gary Steinke, executive director of the Iowa Board of Regents. The board released the names of the four finalists seeking the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA presidency this year, against the recommendations of the college's selection committee. "Taxpayers support higher education to the unbelievable tune of $720 million, which includes a $65 million operating budget increase last year," Steinke said. "We believe because they funded us to such a high degree, they have a right to know who will be heading the institution and why."

This is the second search in Iowa, because the regents there rejected all the finalists selected in a search least year.
http://www.columbusdispatch.com/dispatch/content/local_news/stories/2007/06/15/whereispres.ART_ART_06-15-07_B1_NA71AEA.html

UI Graduate Was Original Nancy Drew Author (Toledo Blade, June 15)
The real Nancy Drew lived in Toledo. For years she went about in relative anonymity, working as a newspaper reporter, and quietly breaking all kinds of stereotypes. In 1980, though, the mystery was solved and the world learned that Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, the first woman to receive a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, authored 23 of the first 25 Nancy Drew mysteries under the pen name Carolyn Keene. What struck many were all of the similarities between the author and her gutsy, independent heroine. Mrs. Benson was a born adventurer who traveled by dugout canoe to explore archaeological sites in Central America. She started taking flying lessons at the age of 59. She always felt an affinity to her fictional sleuth, she once told a New York Times reporter.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070615/ART16/706150309

UI Study Cited In Emissions From Large Farms (Omaha World-Herald, June 15)
Federal and university air quality scientists launched the first nationwide study of air emissions from feeding operations for hogs, dairy cattle and poultry. Scientists from eight universities, including Iowa State University, will conduct the study under the oversight of the Environmental Protection Agency. They will measure gases and compounds from 24 confined animal-feeding sites in nine states over a two-year period. Environmental activists have for years criticized large livestock-feeding operations as potential air polluters. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in 2002 reported that more than 25 percent of workers at such operations report serious respiratory problems. The EPA concluded that it didn't have sufficient information to determine whether animal-feeding operations are complying with existing air emissions requirements.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1208&u_sid=10042945

Fisher Study On Business Subsidies Cited (New York Times, June 15)
Bandon Dunes Golf Resort, a few miles north of a small Oregon town, has created 325 full-time jobs, plus hundreds more part-time jobs. Owner Mike Keiser earns millions of dollars in profits each year. Much controversy swirls around the subsidies and tax exemptions state and local governments offer expressly to attract businesses to a community. But far less attention has been focused on the many kinds of indirect favors that are showered on places like Bandon Dunes through government policies that influence the flow of money from the public to private interests and often serve to reinforce benefits for those who are already successful. No official tally of business subsidies exists, but separate studies, including one by PETER S. FISHER of the University of Iowa, estimated that state and local subsidies aimed at creating jobs total about $50 billion annually. More subtle subsidies like those that benefit Bandon Dunes are not counted in those figures and may be even larger.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/15/business/15subsidy.html?ex=1339560000&en=8319d7057efcb17d&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

Writer Cites UI Study On Psychotic Depression (ABC News, June 15)
How are psychotic depressions different from other depressions? Adding psychosis to the picture means even more difficulties for people who are already battling depression; as confirmed by WILLIAM CORYELL, at the University of Iowa, and his colleagues when they studied people with psychotic depression over a period of 10 years.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/Health/Depression/story?id=3278651&page=1

UI Names Washington Post Gallup Award Winner (Editor & Publisher, June 15)
The Washington Post has been named the recipient of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA School of Journalism and Mass Communication and The Gallup Organization's 2006 annual award, which recognizes excellent journalism using polls. The winning series, "Being a Black Man" was printed beginning in June 2006 drawing on a poll conducted by The Washington Post with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Harvard University.
http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/departments/newsroom/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003599267

Lie Research Noted In Bogle Book Review (New York Review of Books, June 14)
A review of the book "The Battle for the Soul of Capitalism" by Vanguard Management and index mutual fund inventor John Bogle notes that the book rails against corporate fraud and the executives who perpetrate it. The reviewer, James Lardner, notes that since the publication of Bogle's book executives and directors of more than 250 companies have come under suspicion of profiting from fraudulently timed stock option grants. The whistle was blown by ERIK LIE, a professor of finance at the University of Iowa. Through statistical analysis, he established a pattern that could not be explained by chance, thus giving new meaning to the term "probable cause." His 2005 paper "On the Timing of CEO Stock Option Awards" prompted investigations by The Wall Street Journal and eventually the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission; their objective, however, was to prove what Bogle might consider a minor point, for, in his mind, stock options were a scam to begin with.
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/20275

Story Cites UI Partnership With NGI (Popular Science, June 14)
For decades, patients'-rights groups, bioethicists and lawyers have argued that patients should have control over what happens to their tissue once they've donated it or had it removed. "Those samples contain genetic information that could cause you to lose your insurance," says Lori Andrews, director of the Institute for Science, Law and Technology at the Illinois Institute of Technology. "Or they may be used in research that violates your personal or religious beliefs." But scientists have long argued that tracking the desires of each donor would be a logistical nightmare. Now a California-based maker of skin-care products, Dermacia, has developed technology that it claims will give donors an unprecedented degree of control over their cells. Dermacia, through its subsidiary company National Genecular Institute (NGI), recently sealed a deal with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to create a $76-million "biobank" called BioTrust and other research laboratories. NGI will use the bank's samples for developing its own products but will also sell samples to researchers worldwide.
http://www.popsci.com/popsci/science/63c1b82be2eb2110vgnvcm1000004eecbccdrcrd.html

UI Electronic Market More Accurate Than Any Poll (Popular Science, June 14)
A prediction market is like a stock exchange, except people trade not stocks but predictions. The first and most famous prediction market, established at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business school in 1988, was designed to forecast the outcome of that year's presidential election-which it did, with remarkable precision. Anyone could join the market and buy or sell propositions such as "What percent of the popular vote will George H.W. Bush receive in the presidential election?" Traders who thought Bush would get 60 percent or more of the vote would buy the shares if they were less than $60. Traders who disagreed would sell. The market price reflected the consensus view, which turned out to be more accurate than any of the six polls released in the week before the election. But if predicting a landslide Bush I victory over Michael Dukakis seems like fish-in-a-barrel stuff, consider that the Iowa Electronic Markets have correctly predicted the winner of the popular vote in every national election since then, and with greater accuracy than the Gallup poll in all but one of those years.
http://www.popsci.com/popsci/technology/ea97f2a9d5123110vgnvcm1000004eecbccdrcrd.html

UI Publishes Scoliosis Findings (Science Daily, June 14)
Physicians have recognized scoliosis, the abnormal curvature of the spine, since the time of Hippocrates, but its causes have remained a mystery until now. For the first time, researchers have discovered a gene that underlies the condition, which affects about 3 percent of all children. The new finding lays the groundwork for determining how a defect in the gene - known as CHD7 - leads to the C- and S-shaped curves that characterize scoliosis. The gene's link to scoliosis was identified by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, working in collaboration with investigators at the University of Texas, Rutgers University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The group published its results in May in the American Journal of Human Genetics.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070614100445.htm

UI Researchers Will Help Test Small Pox Vaccine (WRAL-TV, June 14)
Researchers from several universities will participate in a series of tests to compare the side effects of an established smallpox vaccine with those caused by a newer one. The trial is being funded by the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of the tests is to see which vaccine would offer the best and quickest protection in the event of a terrorist attack using the smallpox virus. The disease is highly contagious and kills some 30 percent of the people it infects. Participating in the trial are Duke University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Maryland, St. Louis University, the University of Rochester, University Hospitals of Cleveland and the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. The station is based in Raleigh, North Carolina.
http://www.wral.com/business/local_tech_wire/biotech/story/1501524/

Show Runner Milch Received MFA from UI (Outside, July 2007)
A story about the new HBO program "John from Cincinnatti" notes that it was created by David Milch, a "mad genius" who also created "Deadwood" and was executive producer for "NYPD Blue" for several years, and who also received his MFA in writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
This story is not yet available online.

Pascarella Book Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 15)
George D. Kuh, director of the National Survey of Student Engagement, asserts that engagement is a key to academic success for students. "ERNEST T. PASCARELLA of the University of Iowa and Patrick T. Terenzini of Pennsylvania State University came to a similar conclusion in their book, 'How College Affects Students' after summarizing thousands of studies," the article states.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i41/41b01201.htm

IEM Noted As Political Futures Market (Chicago Sun-Times, June 14)
The Iowa Electronic Markets are political futures markets created by professors from the economic and political science departments at the University of Iowa. Think of presidential candidates as pork belly futures or oil futures, and you get the idea. Anyone can play the Iowa Electronic Markets, http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem. You're allowed to spend $5 minimum and $500 maximum on shares -- and if your candidate wins, you earn $1 for each share. You also can invest in several candidates. Let's say you bought Obama shares at 32 cents each and he became the Democratic presidential nominee. You'd make $1 for each share you bought, earning a 68-cent per share profit. Most of the players are University of Iowa faculty and students, but 20 percent are outside investors. "Some of the people who are in the investment business say they find it relaxing to come home and do this," says JOYCE BERG, who teaches accounting at the school's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, which runs the IEM. In the 2004 presidential election, IEM investors spent a total of $400,000 on candidates. "We've had people double or triple their investments," Berg said.
http://www.suntimes.com/news/hunter/427537,CST-NWS-hunter14.article

UI Students Go To 'Camp Obama' (National Public Radio, June 13)
Camp Obama is a camp for adults - mostly young adults and college students - who are hoping to hone their political skills and learn the basics of organizing for a certain barnstorming presidential candidate. It's being held this summer in Chicago. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student Andrew Wiess, a 21-year-old intern in Obama's Iowa City office, says he hopes the camp makes him and other volunteers greater assets to the campaign, so "you go back to Iowa City, or where ever you're from, and just be able to make more of an impact and really know what you're doing, to maximize your potential that way." Tia Upchurch-Freelove, 19, came with Wiess from the University of Iowa as part of the group Hawkeyes for Obama. She says that even though she's lived in Iowa her whole life, she came to Camp Obama to learn more about how the state's caucuses work. "It's really funny, because it seems like a lot of people would know about the caucuses, but for young people especially, they're not taught as much about the caucuses as they should," she says.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11012254&ft=1&f=17

Finalists For UI Presidency Interview With Regents (WQAD-TV, June 13)
Two finalists for the presidency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA interviewed with the state Board of Regents on Wednesday, June 13. Mark Becker is provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of South Carolina. He told regents he has a history of enacting change, but that his first goal if hired would be to learn the school's culture. Sally Mason, provost at Purdue University, touted her commitment to diversity. She says she has tried to hire more women and minorities at Purdue. WQAD originates in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6655525&nav=menu132_2

UI Study Shows Heart Care Varies by Race (Investor's Business Daily, June 13)
Black patients who are hospitalized after a heart attack are far less likely than their white counterparts to get specialized procedure such as a heart bypass surgery, and more likely to die in a year, a study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5fa70e25216eb441e67396fbcf477abc&_docnum=7&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVA&_md5=6ac9749a8a0de6c772b0f8c20d45fe59

UI Study: Race A Factor In Care Of Heart Attack Patients (KOVR-TV, June 13)
A study has found African American Medicare patients are less likely than white patients to receive blood vessel opening procedures such as angioplasty following a heart attack, whether they are admitted to hospitals that provide or do not provide these procedures. In one year, the study mentioned that African Americans had higher death rates because they didn't get transferred to or attended to for their heart attacks, according to an article to be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study was done by researchers at a VA Medical Center and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Carver College of Medicine, which assessed racial differences in patterns of care and risks of death for certain heart attack patients. The CBS affiliate is based in Sacramento, Calif. The story was also published by WABC, New York; WSYR, Syracuse, N.Y.; Reuters; CNN.com; Bloomberg; Scientific American; the Washington Post and several other media outlets.
http://cbs13.com/health/local_story_163190222.html

IUPUI Could Lose Chancellor To Iowa (Indianapolis Star, June 13)
Word that Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) campus's chancellor may leave for Iowa comes as it faces critical questions about its identity, its ties to Indiana University and the fate of programs IUPUI shares with other campuses. Charles Bantz, chancellor of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, was named a finalist for the presidency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Monday and was interviewed Tuesday by Iowa's regents. The possibility of his departure comes just as IU prepares for a new president and amid touchy discussions about splitting schools that have traditionally operated on two or more campuses. All of that is set against the backdrop of tension between IU's campuses in Bloomington and Indianapolis about prominence, prestige and administrative clout.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070613/LOCAL18/706130466/1195/LOCAL18

Key Rutgers Official May Get Iowa Top Job (Newark Star-Ledger, June 13)
Philip Furmanski, a vice president and the second-in-charge at Rutgers University, is one of four finalists for the president's job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Furmanski, who helped lead an overhaul of undergraduate education in his role as executive vice president for academic affairs at Rutgers, spent the past two days interviewing with faculty, administrators and students in Iowa. The 60-year-old administrator said he was approached by school officials to apply for the job about six weeks ago, and that his candidacy does not reflect any dissatisfaction at Rutgers. The university is a "prestigious university," Furmanski said during a phone interview yesterday from Iowa. "It's a comprehensive public research university, very distinguished in many areas and to be president would be a great privilege and a great opportunity."
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-7/118171000767291.xml&coll=1

Bell Comments On Sextuplets' Births (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, June 13)
The sextuplets who were born 4 1/2 months prematurely to a Minnesota couple remained in critical condition Tuesday at a Minneapolis hospital. The four boys and two girls were born Sunday at 22 weeks gestation to Brianna and Ryan Morrison. The newborns, four boys and two girls, ranged in weight from 11 ounces to 1 pound, 3 ounces. Experts say babies born that tiny face life-threatening complications. "There's a small amount of room for hope that at least one of the babies might survive," said DR. EDWARD F. BELL, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa and a specialist in premature newborns. "There's a handful of 22-week babies that have survived, but it's a pretty uncommon event."
http://www.startribune.com/462/story/1242261.html

Atchison Comments On State Health Rankings (USA Today, June 13)
Where you live may help determine how long you live, with residents of the lowest-ranking five states dying prematurely at a rate twice that of those in the top-ranked five, according to a report by the Commonwealth Fund. The rate of premature death in Minnesota, Utah, Vermont, Wyoming and Alaska is half of that of the lowest-performing states, South Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi. "This does as good a job as any report I've seen in bringing in a range of both acute and preventive measures in trying to assess the performance of the health services system for the state," said CHRISTOPHER ATCHISON, associate dean of the College of Public Health at the University of Iowa. Iowa scored high, he suspects, for a variety of reasons, including efforts by hospitals and doctors in the state to work together to promote quality efforts.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/health/2007-06-13-health-states-usat_N.htm#comment

Hovenkamp Quoted On Microsoft Decree (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, June 12)
Government officials are studying whether Microsoft violated the 2001 consent decree that settled a landmark government antitrust suit against Microsoft, according to Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal. Most of the decree expires in November. It bars Microsoft from taking steps to disadvantage desktop software made by rival companies. The current matter underscores one of the problems with the consent decree, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa and has consulted on the case in the past for the states. The settlement "preserves the monopoly and regulates it," he said. "You're just asking for more litigation and ongoing complaints."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/manufacturingtechnology/story/0EE60406E44ED34C862572F8000CD63B?OpenDocument

Smith: Court Ruling Could Put More Burden On Families (Crain's New York Business, June 12)
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Monday that a Long Island health care company did not have to pay overtime to its employees, which advocates said could have serious implications for New York area workers, senior citizens and the disabled. Labor advocates say the ruling could drive some potential workers into other industries. "I think it really doesn't bode well," said University of Iowa Professor PEGGIE SMITH, who filed a brief in the case. "The problem right now is there is an enormous shortage of committed home health care workers." Smith fears that the decision will embolden states to push the burden of caring for aging relatives on family members, who are more committed and cost less than hired workers.
http://www.newyorkbusiness.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070611/FREE/70611011/1097/breaking

Hovenkamp: Microsoft Settlement Invites Lawsuits (St. Louis Post Dispatch, June 12)
A story notes that a complaint by Google argues that Microsoft's new Windows Vista operating system violates an earlier consent decree with the U.S. Justice Department that Microsoft agreed to, in order to settle an anti-trust lawsuit. But the current matter underscores one of the problems with the consent decree, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa and has consulted on the case in the past for the states. The settlement "preserves the monopoly and regulates it," he said. "You're just asking for more litigation and ongoing complaints. It's only reasonable for a dominant firm to favor its own products over the product of rivals." The same story appeared on the Web site of REUTERS.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/business/stories.nsf/manufacturingtechnology/story/0EE60406E44ED34C862572F8000CD63B?OpenDocument

Sluka Urges More Study On Benefits Of Exercise For Pain Reduction (Miami Herald, June 12)
It seems absurd that walking and other forms of exercise may be helpful to lessen pain, but that's the generally accepted -- and now proven -- notion. In studies of older adults entering assisted care, researchers surveyed adults in their 80s who participated in various exercises, with some using a cane, walker or wheelchair. One study group lifted one- to two-pound weights. Others did warm-ups, stretching exercises, then cooled down. But the pain specialists reporting at the American Pain Society conference cautioned there's more research needed on this subject. "We have this clinical evidence exercise can reduce pain, but we have yet to determine how much is beneficial and how much only exacerbates the pain," said Dr. KATHLEEN SLUKA, of the University of Iowa, who added her voice to the American Pain Society's statement.
http://www.miamiherald.com/299/story/135618.html

Two Indianans UI Presidency Finalists (WTHR-TV, June 11)
The last two finalists for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA presidency were announced Monday: Purdue University Provost Sally Mason and Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Chancellor Charles R. Bantz. WTHR is based in Indianapolis. The same story appeared on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, INDIANAPOLIS STAR, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, LAFAYETTE (Ind.) JOURNAL COURIER and the BLOOMINGTON (Ind.) HERALD TIMES.
http://www.wthr.com/Global/story.asp?S=6643310&nav=menu188_2

Squire: GOP Must Campaign In Nevada Caucuses (Las Vegas Sun, June 11)
The Nevada Republican Party has been playing catch-up on its presidential caucus most of the year. The party decided in April to move the date to coincide with the Democratic contest on Jan. 19. The Democrats chose that date last August. The small steps by the Republican candidates are a sign they are reluctant to give away strategy or commit too many resources to the state when the election calendar is in such flux. The calendar is more compressed than ever, as dozens of states jockey for position in hopes that an early primary will bring newfound influence. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa and a caucus expert, said Republicans can't afford to skip Nevada, especially given the media attention the Democratic caucus has attracted. For now, Republicans appear to be waiting for the other guy to make the first move. "As soon as one decides it's worthwhile, the rest will have to scramble," Squire said. The same story appeared on the Web site of the KNOXVILLE (TENN.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/sun/2007/jun/11/566650520.html

Ho Comments On Achievement Test Survey Findings (Education Week, June 11)
Many of the states that claim to have large shares of their students reaching proficiency in reading and mathematics under the No Child Left Behind Act have set less stringent standards for meeting that threshold than lower-performing states, a new federal study finds. The study drew an immediate and strong reaction from many public officials and education advocates, who said it laid bare states' vastly divergent standards for testing students. The report judges states' reading and math tests against a common yardstick: the proficiency standards used by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, often referred to as "the nation's report card." But two researchers who reviewed the study's methods for the Council of Chief State School Officers questioned the reliability of linking NAEP with state exams. In two separate papers ANDREW HO of the University of Iowa and Edward Haertel of Stanford University cited the "large body of literature" pointing to differences in the purposes and design of state tests and NAEP. As many researchers have noted, states craft tests and set achievement levels for them based on where most students are likely to score, and to set realistic goals for improvement, they said. NAEP tests, by contrast, serve "lofty, long-term goals," they write, with much higher achievement levels.
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2007/06/13/41proficient.h26.html

Cooper: Children Need Regular Bathroom Breaks (The Times of Malta, June 11)
CHRISTOPHER COOPER, director of pediatric urology at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital in Iowa City, has been quoted as saying that children arrive at his office with urinary tract infections, incontinence and damaged kidneys, usually caused by infrequent trips to the bathroom. Students do use going to the toilet as excuses. However, the fact remains that children must be allowed to go to the bathroom at least every three hours, for health reasons. (fourth item)
http://www.timesofmalta.com/core/article.php?id=264623

Nancy Drew Author's Papers At UI Libraries (Orange County Register, June 11)
Melanie Rehak was driving in the car with her husband one day in the summer of 2002 when she heard something on National Public Radio that made her stop talking and listen closely. Mildred Wirt Benson, a veteran journalist and the author of the "Nancy Drew" books, had died at age 96 in Toledo. Mildred Benson? But what about Carolyn Keene, the name on the cover of "Secret of the Old Clock," "The Hidden Staircase" and other Nancy Drew Mystery Series books since the 1930s? "It seemed like an incredible story," said Rehak, a writer from Brooklyn. "Not only was Carolyn Keene not a real person, but the person who was Carolyn Keene was an extraordinary, Nancy Drew-like woman, this sort of tough cookie who had a pilot's license and was a newspaper reporter in the '40s." The story got even more intriguing when Rehak went to Benson's alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to look over the writer's papers and found out about Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, the daughter of Benson's boss, Edward Stratemeyer, who thought up Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, the Hardy Boys and other children's-book series. Adams, it turns out, was the other Carolyn Keene.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/life/abox/article_1723892.php

UI Network Hit By Security Breach (Information Week, June 11)
Two universities suffered security breaches that compromised the security of sensitive personal information on students and faculty. Both the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Virginia announced last Friday that they have been sending out notifications about the breaches.
http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=199903218

Nancy Drew Creator Attended UI (Orange County Register, June 11)
A story prompted by the opening of the Nancy Drew movie includes the information that a writer of the Nancy Drew mystery series, Mildred Wirt Benson, grew up in Ladora, Iowa, and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/entertainment/books/article_1723892.php

Squire Comments On Richardson Candidacy (Denver Post, June 10)
New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson intends to "break out" in his quest for the Democratic presidential nomination. "He has had some success here with TV advertising, and that sort of sets him on the right path," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Now, he needs to spend a lot of time in relatively small venues, at homes and the county fairs, to generate talk among activists."
http://www.denverpost.com/lacrosse/ci_6104036

Vonnegut Taught At UI (Herald Times, June 10)
An article about an upcoming writing conference at Indiana University notes that Indianapolis native Kurt Vonnegut Jr. taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The Herald Times is published in Bloomington, Ind.
http://www.heraldtimesonline.com/stories/2007/06/10/news.qp-7314177.sto

Leonard Will Lecture (Deseret News, June 10)
JULIE LEONARD
, who teaches book arts and bookbinding at the University of Iowa Center for the Book, will speak at Brigham Young University in Provo. The Deseret News is published in Utah.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,660227963,00.html

UI Student Is 'Miss Iowa' (WQAD, June 9)
A 23-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student was picked Saturday night as the 2007 Miss Iowa. Diana Reed was selected by judges after three nights of competition at North Scott High School in Eldridge. WQAD originates in Illinois.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6636751&nav=1sW7

Evans Opens Heart And Pocketbook (Pensacola News Journal, June 9)
Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student Reggie Evans, now a power forward for the Denver Nuggets basketball team, is giving back to his hometown of Pensacola, Fla., including an upcoming basketball camp for young people. Last month, Evans treated the entire housing project where he grew up to a barbecue. More than 700 tenants turned out for the May 18 charity picnic to benefit their neighborhood.
http://www.pensacolanewsjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070609/NEWS01/706090325/1006

UI Alumnus Is Vice Chairman Of Joint Chiefs (Rockford Register Star, June 9)
Marine General James Cartwright, an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he captained the swim team, has been appointed vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Rockford Register Star is published in Illinois.
http://www.rrstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070609/NEWS0107/106090044

Rausch Was UI Alumnus (Washington Blade, June 8)
Prominent political activist Richard Rausch, who was the first openly gay member of the Democratic National Committee and was dubbed "The Mayor of Capitol Hill," was an activist growing up in Carroll, Iowa, and while attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washblade.com/2007/6-8/news/localnews/10715.cfm

IEM Profiled (Daily Kos, June 7)
The Iowa Electronic Markets, maintained by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, are explained, and current prices of presidential futures are listed. The Daily Kos is a widely read political blog.
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/6/7/214851/8085

Michigan Photographer Notes UI Influence (Daily Mining Gazette, June 7)
A walk through the photographs reveals abstractions, nature, overlay portraits and seemingly everyday objects and scenes captured in a way that hints at greater meaning and significance. The show exhibits many phases and periods in the life of the artist, Joe Kirkish, from his first years exploring photography in the Copper Country, to the military, his time at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and his return to the Keweenaw. Kirkish, now retired from teaching at Michigan Tech University, started photography at the age of 13. He noted in particular the influence of John Schulze, a UI professor who helped him grow as an artist. The newspaper is based in Calumet and Houghton, Michigan.
http://www.mininggazette.com/stories/articles.asp?articleID=7331

UI Participation Expands Google Library Project (Web Wire, June 7)
The number of libraries participating in the Google Book Search Library Project just got a whole lot bigger with today's addition of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). The CIC is a national consortium of 12 research universities, including the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois, Indiana University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota, Northwestern University, Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. Google will work with the CIC to digitize select collections across all its libraries, up to 10 million volumes.
http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel.asp?aId=38522

Hovenkamp Critical Of Retail Anti-Trust Law (Chicago Tribune, June 7)
Wander the aisles of Costco or Sam's Club and you enter a bizarre alternate universe of products for sale. Cereal comes in twin packs. Coke is available in cases containing 32 cans, not 24. And printer cartridges are sold in three-packs, not as singles or in pairs as at other stores. These packaging oddities are a direct result of a 1936 antitrust law that was designed to keep a level playing field in American commerce but critics say has lost its usefulness. They contend the law actually costs consumers millions of dollars annually while forcing manufacturers to concoct wild, unnecessary packaging schemes. The legislation -- the Robinson-Patman Act -- is such an ingrained part of the American retailing landscape that it gets little notice. The act requires manufacturers to sell products to all retailers at the same price -- unless there is something significantly different, such as the way it is sized or packaged, said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa Law School. The packaging requirement, of course, is what leads to warehouse clubs selling uniquely large versions of familiar brands. If the act were to go away, then all stores could compete on price for, say, regular-size boxes of cereal or pretzels, though it's true that warehouse stores define themselves by their distinctively-packaged offerings. Big-box retailers with their tremendous sales volumes likely would be able to negotiate the steepest discounts, thus pressuring grocery stores. Hovenkamp, who is critical of Robinson-Patman, said its repeal would encourage competition. "I expect a large number of retailers would make changes and I think nearly all would benefit consumers," he said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-thu_packaging0607_jun07,1,3144877.story?track=rss

Bust Honoring Tennessee Williams Unveiled (St. Louis Post Dispatch, June 7)
A story about the unveiling of a life-sized bronze bust honoring playwright Tennessee Williams in his hometown of St. Louis notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/news/stories.nsf/stlouiscitycounty/story/10299D5A2657EDA8862572F300107204?OpenDocument

Alumna Sings Tosca As Last-Minute Fill-In (Prague Post, June 7)
Michele Crider was doing some gardening at her home in Austria one day two weeks ago when the phone rang. It was her agent in New York City, asking if she would consider going to Prague to sing Tosca. "When do you need me?" she asked. "Tomorrow." "So I grabbed my bag, got on a plane, and here I am," she said a few days later over coffee at the K + K Hotel Fenix near Wenceslas Square. That was Saturday afternoon. The next night she was at the State Opera, holding the audience spellbound with a riveting portrayal of Puccini's tormented heroine. By turns passionate, seductive, tender and defiant, Crider owned the stage. There was no mistaking the world-class voice, but it was the controlled power of her performance, like a gathering storm, that dominated the evening. Crider studied music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Post is published in the Czech Republic.
http://www.praguepost.com/articles/2007/06/06/a-skillful-jump-into-the-fire.php

Redlawsk: Skipping Poll May Hurt Giuliani, McCain (Washington Post, June 6)
Republican presidential hopefuls Rudolph Giuliani and Sen. John McCain will skip Iowa's August straw poll, but their campaigns insisted on Wednesday they would compete in the state's 2008 nominating contest. Skipping the straw poll could hurt, particularly if all the other Republican candidates are at the event, one expert said. "Iowa caucus-goers pay attention to these things," University of Iowa professor DAVID REDLAWSK said. The same story was published on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES and REUTERS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/06/AR2007060601472.html

Sluka: Exercise Can Both Relieve And Exacerbate Pain (Palm Beach Post, June 6)
A story about pain relief notes that research is demonstrating that exercise, often as simple as walking or stretching, can help reduce pain. But the pain specialists reporting at the American Pain Society conference cautioned there's more research needed on this subject. "We have this clinical evidence exercise can reduce pain, but we have yet to determine how much is beneficial and how much only exacerbates the pain," said Dr. KATHLEEN SLUKA of the University of Iowa, who added her voice to the American Pain Society's statement. The Post is published in Florida.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/accent/content/accent/epaper/2007/06/06/a3e_susman_0606.html

Doern: MRSA Staph Infection Can Kill (Spokane Spokesman Review, June 6)
A serious spike in cases of dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria has doctors at some Spokane health clinics treating first and testing later to stanch a "tidal wave" of potentially deadly infection. More than half the people showing up at Community Health Association of Spokane clinics with what they think are spider bites, small cuts and other skin lesions that won't heal are testing positive for MRSA -- methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus. Even more troubling, the most common strain of community-acquired MRSA is far more toxic than the hospital-acquired variety, said a national expert scheduled to discuss the subject in Spokane. "The one that you don't want to get is community-acquired MRSA because it will kill you," said GARY V. DOERN, professor of clinical microbiology at the University of Iowa Health Care pathology department.
http://www.spokesmanreview.com/breaking/story.asp?ID=10186

Congressman Mayne Was UI Law Alumnus (Los Angeles Times, June 6)
Wiley Mayne, 90, who represented northwest Iowa in Congress for eight years and was one of 10 Republicans who voted not to impeach President Nixon, died May 27 at St. Luke's Regional Medical Center in Sioux City, Iowa. Mayne received his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-passings6.1jun06,1,1407650.story?coll=la-headlines-pe-california

Alumna Writes About Cicada Music (Oak Park/River Forest Journal, June 6)
A columnist writing about the "music" of cicadas notes that she spent years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA learning to analyze music. Cathryn Wilkinson writes: "Fine-tuned hearing is what a musician has to develop to prepare for a profession of listening. Careful listening is what musicians are all about. Ask us to tune out a sound and we can't do it. Ask where a pin dropped, and we'll be proud to tell you we heard it." The Journal is published in Illinois.
http://www.wednesdayjournalonline.com/main.asp?SectionID=4&SubSectionID=4&ArticleID=7965&TM=83301.33

Letters By O'Connor In Emory Special Collections (Associated Press, June 6)
A steady stream of Flannery O'Connor biographers and a few fans have wandered into Emory University's special collections library over the last few weeks to read letters the author wrote to longtime friend Elizabeth "Betty" Hester. The letters were unsealed in mid-May after 20 years. Hester donated them to Emory in 1987 with the stipulation that they remain closed to the public for that long. "The idea of reading new letters of Flannery O'Connor is amazing," said Brad Gooch, who has been working on a biography about the Georgia native for four years. "It creates a timeline, a picture in your head of what it was like." O'Connor received a master's degree from the Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This Associated Press story also appeared on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, the MIAMI HERALD and several other newspapers.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2007/06/05/entertainment/e113716D21.DTL

Story Cites Architect Of New UI Art Building (New York Times, June 6)
Working on theoretical proposals and the occasional house commission, Steven Holl emerged as a rare, original talent in the 1980s. The strength of his vision was rooted in a desire to reconnect architecture to the physical world -- the shifting nature of light, the reflective surfaces of water, the texture of materials -- and an atavistic love of craft. Holl went on to design plenty of good buildings, like Simmons Hall, with its porous steel-grid facade, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the angular forms of the art school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/06/arts/design/06nels.html?ex=1338782400&en=d08768badf28ba33&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

Rawlings To Lead Higher Education Commission (The Leader-Herald, June 5)
New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer's creation of a state Higher Education Commission, which will study ways to improve the quality of college education, will be chaired by HUNTER RAWLINGS, president emeritus of Cornell University and the University of Iowa. The commission will study the existing higher-education system and make recommendations regarding: improving access to the education system; expanding degree programs to reflect state and regional economic development objectives; preparing community college graduates for a smooth transition to four-year institutions or obtaining good jobs after graduation; and improving the capacity of the state's university research centers, which would provide additional job opportunities for graduates. The newspaper is based in Gloversville, N.Y.
http://www.leaderherald.com/Editorials/articles.asp?articleID=10451

Cooper: Children Need Regular Bathroom Breaks (The Post-Chronicle, June 5)
Urinary tract and bladder issues may be forming in children because of irregular urination habits caused by not being allowed to use the toilet at school. CHRISTOPHER COOPER, director of pediatric urology at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital, said he has seen many elementary-age, "normal children who have developed bad habits." Cooper said children arrive at his office with urinary tract infections, incontinence and damaged kidneys, usually caused by infrequent trips to the bathroom. The newspaper is based in Denville, N.J.
http://www.postchronicle.com/news/health/article_21284637.shtml

Hogan: Marshall Plan Helped Make European Self-Help Possible (Monsters and Critics, June 5)
A story on the 60th anniversary on the announcement of the Marshall Plan notes that its designers cannot take all of the credit for rebuilding Western Europe. Local resources accounted for 80 to 90 per cent of capital formation in the major European economies during the first two years of the recovery program, according to University of Iowa history professor MICHAEL HOGAN, a prominent expert on the Marshall Plan. Yet, the Marshall Plan provided the 'critical margin' of support that made European self-help possible. It fuelled essential imports, eased production bottlenecks, encouraged higher rates of capital formation and helped to suppress inflation, Hogan wrote in a paper marking the 50th anniversary of Marshall's speech. Monsters and Critics is published in the UK.
http://news.monstersandcritics.com/usa/features/article_1311939.php/Marshall_Plan_still_praised_debated_60_years_later

UI Study Urges Elimination Of Carageenan From Diet (The Guardian, June 5)
A story about the potentially harmful effects of food additives notes that one, carrageenan, could be particularly dangerous in its degraded form. The story cites a review of studies into carrageenan and cancer by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2001 found the undegraded additive could become degraded in our digestive system, leading to an increased risk of cancers in the gut. Dr Joanne Tobacman, who conducted the review, said, "The widespread use of carrageenan in the western diet should be reconsidered." The Guardian is published in the United Kingdom.
http://lifeandhealth.guardian.co.uk/wellbeing/story/0,,2095618,00.html

UI Maintains Tiny Baby Registry (Medical Observer, June 5)
A story about how the survival of early-term babies is affecting the late-term abortion issue notes that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA maintains a tiny baby database registry, though it doesn't track the long-term health of the babies on the register. The Observer is published in Australia.
http://www.medicalobserver.com.au/displayarticle/index.asp?articleID=7893&templateID=105&sectionID=0&sectionName=

Obama Spoke At UI (New York Observer, June 5)
An analysis of Barack Obama's health care plan notes that he outlined the details in a speech he delivered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (New York Observer, June 5)
http://www.observer.com/2007/health-plan-guru-obama-almost-there

Obama Delivered Health Care Reform Speech At UI (BusinessWeek, June 4)
A story about Michael Moore's new documentary critical of the U.S. health care system notes Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama recently proposed a sweeping health care reform in a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web site of MSNBC.
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/jun2007/db20070604_109406.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index_businessweek+exclusives

Kutcher Was UI Student (Racine Journal Times, June 4)
A columnist writing about people who have careers in different fields than their college major notes that actor Ashton Kutcher was a biomedical engineering major at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Journal Times is published in Wisconsin.
http://www.journaltimes.com/nucleus/index.php?itemid=13396

UI Program Develops Flight Assistance Program (Discovery Channel)
A story on the Discovery Channel's Daily Planet program recently showcased the work of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Operator Performance Lab in designing a system that monitors a pilot's vital signs during flight. The video can be accessed at the following site:
http://www.ccad.uiowa.edu/opl/videos/discovery/

Missen's Project Aids African Schools (Denver Post, June 4)
CLIFF MISSEN, a development specialist, is director of the WiderNet project at the University of Iowa. He and his eight volunteers have created the "eGranary," which puts the equivalent of a library on a 750-gigabyte hard-disk drive. They then distribute these drives to school officials and librarians throughout Africa.
http://www.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_6054446

UI Golf Course Mentioned (Christian Science Monitor, June 4)
In a "Home Forum" essay, Lauren Reece Flaum wrote about her son, "Chet and his gaggle of golf buddies had come off the greens and into the clubhouse at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S FINKBINE GOLF COURSE to watch the final holes of the Masters Golf Tournament. As they were glued to the drama on the set -- small-town Iowa boy versus Tiger Woods -- a phone call came in to the pro shop. A reporter from ESPN was looking for the coach who had rejected Zach Johnson - the soon-to-be green-jacketed winner of the Masters - from the Iowa team years ago. The guys went wild."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0604/p18s02-hfes.html

Avian Flu Is Focus Of UI Research (News-Medical.net, June 3)
Veterinarians who work with birds are at increased risk for infection with avian influenza virus and should be among those with priority access to pandemic influenza vaccines and antivirals, according to a study conducted by researchers in the University of Iowa College of Public Health. The investigators, led by KENDALL MYERS, a doctoral student in occupational and environmental health, and GREGORY GRAY, UI professor of epidemiology, examined blood samples from a group of U.S. veterinarians for evidence of previous avian influenza virus infection. The veterinarians all had occupational exposure to live chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese or quail. The study showed that, compared with the control group, the veterinarians who worked with birds had significantly higher levels of antibodies in their blood against the H5, H6 and H7 avian virus strains, indicating previous infections with these viruses. News-medical.net originates in Australia.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=25827

Cooper Is Critical Of School Bathroom Policies (USA Today, June 3)
CHRISTOPHER COOPER
, director of pediatric urology at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital in Iowa City, says he has seen many elementary-age "normal children who have developed bad habits." They arrive at his office with urinary tract infections, incontinence and damaged kidneys, often as a result of infrequent trips to the bathroom. Cooper encourages people of all ages to use the bathroom every two or three hours, but he finds that school settings pose challenges. Some students avoid bathrooms because they're dirty, smelly havens for bullies. Others, Cooper says, can't get permission to go as often as necessary. "So many parents would tell us, 'We can't do that. The teachers won't let them go to the bathroom' as often as they need to," Cooper says. He says teachers should let children go whenever they say they need to. "Responding to your body's need to urinate or defecate is a basic human right, or even one step below that, it's a basic animal right," Cooper says.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2007-06-03-children-bathroom-breaks_N.htm

UI Seeks Eye Disease Cure (State Journal Register, June 3)
The annual celebrity bowling tournament run by pitcher Chicago Cubs pitcher Kerry Wood will serve as a fundraiser for Leber's Congenital Amaurosisis. The 4-year-old daughter of Derrek Lee was diagnosed with LCA last September and has lost vision in one eye. Last year, Lee created Project 3000 with Boston Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck to help the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA advance scientific understanding of this genetic eye disease and work toward a cure. The State Journal Register is published in Springfield, Ill.
http://www.sj-r.com/sections/sports/stories/115943.asp

Gordon Comments On Health Care Proposals (Reuters, June 3)
Presidential candidates are offering proposals for health care reform, but, "I think on balance that they're pretty timid," said COLIN GORDON, a University of Iowa history professor and author of a book on the politics of U.S. health care in the 20th century. That is because "there's no escaping the fact that the core source of high health care costs in the U.S. ... is the fragmented system of provision," he said.
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N01357344.htm

Dunbar Comments On Virginia Test (Virginian-Pilot, June 3)
Many Virginia children are achieving perfect scores on the history Standards of Learning test. Educators said students' success in history showed how well Virginia's standards are being taught and learned. Others wondered whether the tests are too easy. "The obvious question," said STEVE DUNBAR, an education professor at the University of Iowa, "is, 'Are kids in third grade in Virginia really better in social studies than anything else?'" The Virginian-Pilot is published in Hampton Roads, Va.
http://content.hamptonroads.com/story.cfm?story=125936&ran=133723&tref=po

Holl Designed UI Art Building (Louisville Courier-Journal, June 3)
An article on the opening of the new Nelson-Atkins Museum addition in Kansas City notes that the architect, Steven Holl, "recently completed an award-winning new art department building jutting over a lake at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070603/SCENE05/706030326/1047/SCENE05

Prodigy's Parents Met At UI (Boston Herald, June 3)
Six-year-old pianist prodigy Charlie Liu is being compared to Mozart. His parents, Mingyi Liu Jen Xie, are Chinese immigrants who met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.bostonherald.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=1004549

Golf Column Cites UI Study (Guardian Observer, June 3)
A column on efforts to make golf courses more eco-friendly cites a 1996 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that showed higher rates of brain and prostate cancers and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in golf-course workers than in the general population. The Guardian originates in the UK.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/magazine/story/0,,2090720,00.html

UI Depression Research Cited (Bioscienceworld, June 3)
Several recent U.S. studies bring to light additional information surrounding causes and symptoms of depression. One study, conducted by researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, revealed that many of those who had suffered from traumatic brain injury (TBI) also suffer from major depression following their injury. The study followed 91 patients who had experienced TBI, and found that 33 per cent of those patients suffered from major depression during the first year following their injury. These patients also demonstrated comorbid anxiety and aggressive behavior. Bioscienceworld originates in Canada.
http://bioscienceworld.ca/DepressionTreatmentImprovedThroughResearch

Denberg Research Cited (Naples Daily News, June 2)
Columnist Ben Bova wrote, "My column about the ways the tobacco industry tries to influence teenagers to smoke drew a letter from Dr. Joe Trotzig, of Naples. He cited medical research done by Dr. NATALIE DENBERG at the University of Iowa, who found that the brains of adolescents are not fully grown to maturity. In particular, the area in the frontal lobe of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for decision-making is not fully mature until the mid-20s. The Naples Daily News is published in Florida.
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2007/jun/02/ben_bova_theres_universe_valuable_information_my_r/

Squire Comments About Iowa Religious Conservatives (Boston Globe, June 1)
Iowa's religious conservatives, a powerful force in Republican presidential politics for two decades, could be kingmakers again in 2008, but it is unclear which candidate will win their support. "They are still a significant factor in the party and they will play a prominent role in the caucuses, which rely heavily on mobilization and identifying constituencies you can turn out," said political analyst PEVERILL SQUIRE of the University of Iowa. This story also appeared in the Washington Post.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2007/06/01/religious_conservatives_still_have_clout_in_iowa/

Trachsel Comments On Text Messaging (High Plains Journal, June 1)
An Irish study was released in April indicating that our communication skills could be permanently damaged from the increase in text messaging. MARY TRACHSEL, head of the University of Iowa Rhetoric Department, commented on the results. "Because there are so many other ways besides writing to communicate these days, students are not getting the same amount of writing practice as they did in the past. They have a hard time telling what is a complete sentence. They write with run-ons, sentence fragments, often not following standard writing rules." The High Plains Journal is published in Kansas.
http://www.hpj.com/archives/2007/jun07/jun4/Sendandreceive.cfm

Ketelson Credits Gammon (Classical Singer Magazine, June 1)
In a story about UI School of Music alumnus Kyle Ketelson, he says, "It was ALBERT GAMMON at the University of Iowa who thought I had a voice and suggested that I study seriously. He gave me an excellent technique, and I haven't really had to change anything basic about it."
http://www.classicalsinger.com/magazine/article.php?id=1534

UI Ophthalmology Department Studies Blindness In Dogs (Science Daily, June 1)
Two dogs have been successfully treated for blindness by a research team led by Iowa State University veterinary ophthalmologist Dr. Sinisa Grozdanic in the College of Veterinary Medicine. Grozdanic and his colleagues wanted a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that cause sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS). They worked with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences to conduct genetic testing of SARDS tissue, cross referencing the results with the UI's database of genetic information from different human ocular diseases.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070531094241.htm

UI Cited In Story On Flannery O'Connor (International Herald Tribune, June 1)
Somewhere outside Toomsboro, Ga. is where, in Flannery O'Connor's best-known short story, "A Good Man Is Hard to Find," a family has a car accident and a tiresome old grandmother has an epiphany. The fog of petty selfishness that has shrouded her life clears when she feels a sudden spasm of kindness for a stranger, a brooding prison escapee who calls himself the Misfit. Of course, that's also the moment that he shoots her in the chest, but in O'Connor's world, where good and evil are as real as a spreading puddle of blood, it amounts to a happy ending. The grandmother is touched by grace at the last possible moment, and she dies smiling. O'Connor learned her writing craft at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at Yaddo, the writer's colony in Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/02/08/travel/web.0209trconnor.php

 

 

 

 

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