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UI in the News

July 2007

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UI Writing Programs In 'Best of the Best' (Atlantic, July/August 2007)
The Atlantic Monthly magazine profiles the 10 best creative writing graduate programs at U.S. universities, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200708/mfa-programs

Wellmark Offer Sparks Debate (USA Today, July 31)
A college diploma could soon come with a corporate name. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is considering whether to rename its College of Public Health after Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield's foundation in exchange for a $15 million gift from the company's philanthropic arm. Terry Burton, a naming-rights consultant based in Vancouver, British Columbia, says he believes Iowa would be the first public university to name a college after a corporation. The offer has ignited a debate over where universities should draw the line when accepting corporate gifts. The story was also published in the JOURNAL & COURIER of West Lafayette, Ind.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2007-07-31-naming-rights_N.htm

Naming Gifts Often Top $15 Million (Chronicle, July 31)
Officials, alumni and curious observers continue to dig deeper into the controversy surrounding a would-be gift to the University of Iowa's School of Public Health from Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Aside from the concerns of faculty members and other officials that naming a public-health college for an insurance company was ethically questionable, apparently the dean of the college, JIM MERCHANT, also believed the $15-million gift was "embarrassingly small," according to the Des Moines Register. Compared to the naming gifts at peer institutions, the donation was on the lower end, the newspaper reports: $30-million for the Joseph A. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University; $25-million for the Mel and Enid Zuckerman School of Public Health at the University of Arizona; and a $50-million commitment from Dennis and Joan Gillings at the University of North Carolina.
http://chronicle.com/blogs/facevalue/index.php?id=344

McMurray Comments On Eye Tracking Technology (New York Times, July 31)
For decades, developmental psychologists have tried to decipher the developing mind by looking at infants' eye movements, but it has not been easy. In some of the latest tools, tiny video cameras are embedded in display screens, where their lenses can track eye movements unobtrusively while keeping up with a bobbing head. Other tools come with pan-tilt cameras that can be operated remotely. It is hard to know how many laboratories are using eye trackers with infants. BOB MCMURRAY, a psychologist at the University of Iowa, uses one to augment his research on speech perception. Like Scott P. Johnson at New York University, he has had multiple inquiries from researchers interested in the technology. He estimates that while several dozen laboratories collect data on babies' looking patterns, about 10 to 15 of them have invested in eye trackers. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/31/health/psychology/31eye.html?ref=health

Swarnavel Teaches At UI (The Hindu, July 30)
A profile of Tamil documentary filmmaker E. SWARNAVEL notes that he is now a research scholar at the University of Iowa, where he teaches film studies and is writing a screenplay. The Hindu originates in India.
http://www.hindu.com/2007/07/30/stories/2007073059461100.htm

UI Helps Crack Glass Ceiling (Financial Times Deutschland, July 30)
According to the American Council on Education, women make up about a quarter of all college and university presidents across the United States. In the past six months schools including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Indiana's Purdue University and Ohio's Case Western Reserve University have all appointed heads who are women. At a time when female management lags behind in other professions, the fact that some of the most powerful universities in the world are now run by women signifies that they have at least cracked, if not broken, the glass ceiling of U.S. academic leadership. http://www.ftd.de/karriere_management/business_english/:Business%20English%20Women%20US/231329.html

UI Collaborates On Bipolar Research (Medical News Today, July 30)
Through a five-year, $9 million grant, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will collaborate with two other medical centers in research to find new ways to improve and personalize treatments for bipolar disorder. Medical News Today originates in the UK.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/78087.php

Stone Comments On Failed Merger (Argus Leader, July 30)
The abruptly dropped sale of Sioux Falls-based NorthWestern Corp. -- a former Fortune 500 company that hit hard times -- to Australia's Babcock and Brown Infrastructure could force stock prices lower and shrink the pool of other prospective buyers. The dropped sale will hurt the NorthWestern's ability to find other buyers, said ETHAN STONE, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who follows mergers. The Argus Leader is published in Sioux Falls, S.D.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070730/NEWS/707300314/1001

Covington Comments On Campaign (Times of India, July 30)
The confrontation between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama seems to be welcomed by both camps. "It plays to both of their strengths," said CARY COVINGTON, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. The AFP wire story is appearing internationally.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/The_United_States/US_presidential_race_turns_nasty/articleshow/2242962.cms

Englander Studied With Robinson (London Times, July 29)
A profile of fiction writer Nathan Englander says that Englander "...did something so sane, so enviable, so right, I can barely bring myself to report it. He applied to the University of Iowa. This is what every aspiring young writer in the world should do, for one simple reason. At the Iowa University is the Iowa Writers' Workshop, and at the Iowa Writers' Workshop is MARILYNNE ROBINSON... not only one of the greatest writers alive, but one of the greatest teachers of writing. ... Robinson's work shines with her sense of the high moral calling of fiction, of the supreme virtue of getting it right, of telling the truth."
http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article2141164.ece

Covington Comments On Political Chess Game (Las Vegas Sun, July 29)
CARY COVINGTON
, a University of Iowa political scientist and a scholar of presidential elections, said Clinton and the Republicans are already three or four moves into the chess battle that usually begins after the nominees have been chosen. Clinton's electability is an issue as she makes her case with Democratic voters, Covington said. But he added that as long Clinton continues to win in head-to-head polls against leading Republican candidates, Democratic voters will be satisfied with her electability.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/sun/2007/jul/29/566659117.html

Alumna's Artwork Is On View (News & Observer, July 29)
Ann Marie Kennedy's 'Memory House' was installed at North Carolina State University's Gregg Museum of Art and Design in the spring. While working on her Master of Fine Arts degree at the University of Iowa, she worked in a paper conservation laboratory and studied Japanese papermaking techniques with TIMOTHY BARRETT. The News & Observer is published in Raleigh, N.C.
http://www.newsobserver.com/308/story/653122.html

UI 'Hospitalists' Study Cited (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, July 29)
Hospitalized patients are increasing being tended by "hospitalists," general medicine specialists who free primary care doctors from bedside visits. According to Society of Hospital Medicine data, patients seen by hospitalists averaged one less day at a hospital and averaged a 10 percent reduction in costs, much of which came from savings in nursing expenses and lab costs. The savings data came from services rendered to 1,706 patients treated at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hospital in 2000-01.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/Business_Matters/197153/

Ohlmann Develops Fantasy Football Draft Model (BusinessWeek, July 30)
With the NFL preseason just three weeks away, 10 million fantasy football players are starting to, well, fantasize about ideal rosters. Few will pick as painstakingly as JEFFREY OHLMANN. The University of Iowa management sciences professor has created a computer model that uses three inputs to draft a team. (See sixth item: "That's Some Dream Team")
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_31/c4044009.htm?chan=search

Hall Of Fame Broadcaster Got Start At WSUI (Camarillo Acorn, July 27)
This fall, Hall of Fame broadcaster Bob Miller will begin his 35th year calling Sacramento Kings hockey games on television. When Miller was growing up, he wanted to be a baseball player, but his plans changed in college when he started working for the campus radio station, WSUI, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Camarillo Acorn is published in California.
http://www.thecamarilloacorn.com/news/2007/0727/Sports/045.html

Seberg Attended UI (Indymedia UK, July 27)
A profile of the late film actress Jean Seberg notes that she attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2007/07/377068.html

Greenberg Death May Prompt Court Challenges (Seattle Times/KING-TV, July 27)
The arrest and suicide of Stuart Greenberg, a prominent Seattle psychologist who was often an expert witness in sexual-abuse and child-custody cases, could raise questions about his recommendations, and some could be challenged, judges say. Greenberg taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before moving to the West Coast.
http://www.king5.com/localnews/stories/NW_072707WABTIMES_greenberg_suicide_psych_JM.b702314d.html

Redlawsk Weighs In On Political Tussling (New York Daily News, July 27)
Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama ripped each other as the bigger foreign policy dunce yesterday on the dos and don'ts of dealing with dictators. The Illinois Democrat stepped up the battle by calling Clinton's approach to world affairs "Bush-Cheney lite." Clinton slapped back, "This is getting kind of silly." University of Iowa's DAVID REDLAWSK said, "If it's going to get this nasty this early, it's going to be interesting," adding he remembers John Kerry winning Iowa in 2004 after front-running Howard Dean and Richard Gephardt pounded each other.
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/wn_report/2007/07/27/2007-07-27_hil__bam_tussle_on_dictator_talks-2.html

Cameron Remembers Late UI Coach Jimmy Grant (Jamaica Observer, July 27)
"I always wanted to grow up to be just like him." Such are the fond memories Bert Cameron has of his former coach, JAMES 'JIMMY' GRANT, who passed away on Monday after a two-year battle with cancer. Grant, who coached at the high school level in Jamaica for 11 years and also coached at G.C. Foster College of Physical Education & Sport, St. Catherine, Jamaica, moved to Iowa in 1986, where he served with the University of Iowa's Women's track and field program for 23 years. He was an assistant coach for 11 years and head coach for 12.
http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/sports/html/20070726T230000-0500_125630_OBS_CAMERON_REMEMBERS_LATE_COACH_JIMMY_GRANT_.asp

Author Elin Hilderbrand Is UI Alumna (Daily American, July 27)
In the novel "Barefoot" (Little, Brown & Co., 403 pages, $24.99) by Elin Hilderbrand, a graduate of the graduate fiction workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the character Vickie Stowe, the mother of two young boys, just found out she has lung cancer. She and her sister, Brenda Lyndon, and a friend, Melanie Patchen, have gone to Nantucket for a vacation after Brenda was fired for having an affair with a student and Melanie -- who spent years and a lot of money trying to become pregnant -- did so but found out her husband is having an affair. The DAILY AMERICAN is based in Somerset, Pa.
http://www.dailyamerican.com/articles/2007/07/31/opinion/columns/3_vicki.txt

Johnson Comments On FCC Rules (National Public Radio, July 26)
NBC says it will stop airing reruns of "Law & Order" featuring Fred Thompson, if Thompson makes his White House bid official. "Law & Order" reruns are scheduled to keep airing on the TNT cable network. Federal Communications Commission rules require stations to give equal time to other candidates. Joe Slasher, a spokesman for NBC Universal says the equal-time requirement does not apply to programming on national cable networks, including cable runs of the "Law & Order" programs. That might seem like the last word, but former FCC Commissioner NICHOLAS JOHNSON, who now teaches communications law at the University of Iowa, says watch out for a plot twist. "I think there is room for ambiguity there, and that's what lawyers get paid for," he said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=19a0f09746623ed4a2192eccf471bc51&_docnum=20&wchp=dGLbVzW-zSkVA&_md5=5a0663e07823962564306249a74ed92a

Cost Of Birth Control Pills At Colleges Rises (Wall Street Journal, July 26)
College students returning to campus in a few weeks will be greeted by steep increases in one of the few items they have been able to buy cheap: birth control. In recent months, at Michigan State University, East Lansing, the price of Ortho Evra, a birth-control skin patch by Johnson & Johnson, more than doubled to $50 for a month's prescription from $20 last year. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo, a low-estrogen pill also by J&J, rose to $52 recently from $16 last year. Versions of this story also ran July 27 in the COLORADO DAILY and were picked up by FOXNews.com and the Associated Press.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118540828452878301.html?mod=world_news_whats_news

Weiner Comments On Research Budget Cuts (Register-Guard, July 26)
President Bush told cancer researchers gathered at the National Institutes of Health in January, "We need to make sure that our scientists are given the tools and encourage young kids to become scientists in the first place." Yet his administration's stingy NIH budgets over the past five years and its threat last week to veto the appropriations bill giving the NIH a small funding boost sound more like components of what might be called a "Discourage Future Scientists Act." The average age for first-time NIH grant recipients has risen to 41.7 from 34.2 in 1970. "Our biggest concern," GEORGE WEINER, director of the University of Iowa's cancer center, told the Daily Iowan last year, "is that these people are going to give up on a research career." The Register-Guard is published in Eugene, Ore.
http://www.registerguard.com/news/2007/07/26/ed.col.science.0726.p1.php?section=opinion

Magazine Ranks Writing Programs (Charlottesville Daily Progress, July 26)
In the Atlantic magazine's upcoming fiction issue, a ranking lists the University of Virginia among the top 10 graduate writing programs in the nation, alongside the creative writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, among others. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://dailyprogress.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=CDP%2FMGArticle%2FCDP_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1173352139623&path=!news

UI Is Member Of Chicago Climate Exchange (Miami Herald, July 26)
Miami-Dade is the first local government in the southeastern United States to join the Chicago Climate Exchange. Other members include King County, Washington; the Ford Motor Company; the city of Chicago; the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; and the Eastman Kodak Co.
http://www.miamiherald.com/851/story/182558.html

Book Recalls World War II Era New York (Community Times, July 25)
A new book "Summer at Tiffany," recalls the adventure of two college girls, fresh from the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority house at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who miraculously land summer jobs as pages at Tiffany & Co. The newspaper is based in Maryland.
http://www.communitytimes.com/default.asp?sourceid=&smenu=67&twindow=Default&mad=No&sdetail=5150&wpage=&skeyword=&sidate=&ccat=&ccatm=&restate=&restatus=&reoption=&retype=&repmin=&repmax=&rebed=&rebath=&subname=&pform=&sc=1049&hn=communitytimes&he=.com

Suls Comments On Humor (The Hindu, July 25)
Psychology researchers suggest that the ability to understand a joke and enjoy it is an indication of how well our brains perform. They further conclude that humor appreciation decreases as the brain ages. Contemporary psychologists point out that humor comprehension, or understanding a joke has two components. According to the psychologist JERRY M. SULS of the University of Iowa, appreciation of jokes and cartoons is an act of information processing in two stages. These are: the surprise factor and resolution or coherence. The Hindu is printed in 12 Indian cities and is based in Madras, India.
http://www.hindu.com/seta/2007/07/26/stories/2007072650011500.htm

Gronbeck Comments on Clinton-Obama Scuffle (New York Daily News, July 25)
Barack Obama's response to a diplomacy question during Monday night's Democratic debate set the stage for a war about peace, with Clintonistas moving quickly to capitalize on what they call his lack of experience. BRUCE GRONBECK of the University of Iowa said he doesn't think the comment exactly means curtains for Obama. "I don't think this is any kind of major gaffe," Gronbeck said. "I will say he gave everyone else an easy answer, including John Edwards, who said 'Me too,' after Hillary got it right."
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/wn_report/2007/07/25/2007-07-25_a_tempest_over_despots_.html

Covington Assesses Campaign Budget (Berliner Morgenpost, July 25)
Barack Obama has set new fundraising records, but will that money translate into votes? UI political science professor CARY COVINGTON says, "At the moment, it's only dollars." The Berliner Morgenpost is published in Germany.
http://www.morgenpost.de/content/2007/07/25/politik/912354.html

UI Doctoral Student Comments On Harry Potter (Bowling Green News, July 25)
The popularity of the Harry Potter books has provoked concern among some religious groups. Denise Kettering, who is pursuing her Ph.D. in religious studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said this concern is caused mainly because Potter is not an adult, and he is not necessarily a good role model for children readers. "The most serious problems arise when those who become most critical about the books have not actually read them because their concerns and objections are not taken seriously by those who read the books," Kettering said. "Some Christians have legitimate concerns. Unfortunately, their concerns are lumped in with the naysayers who have not read the books and so they are dismissed rather than taken seriously as concerns about their children's welfare." The Bowling Green News is published in Kentucky.
http://media.www.bgnews.com/media/storage/paper883/news/2007/07/25/Pulse/Some-Think.Potter.Books.Cross.Religious.Lines-2926767-page2.shtml

UI Alumna's Book Is Reviewed (Daily American, July 24)
A book columnist reviews "Barefoot" by Erin Hilderbrand, a graduate of the fiction workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Daily American is published in Somerset County, Pa.
http://www.dailyamerican.com/articles/2007/07/24/opinion/columns/1_vicki.txt

Muruganandham Collaborates On Spinal Injury Research (Science Daily, July 24)
Research on rats with crushed spinal cords, similar to human injury, reveals that treatment soon after injury combining radiation therapy to destroy harmful cells and microsurgery to drain excess fluids significantly increases the body's ability to repair the injured cord leading to permanent recovery from injury. Since repair of damaged cord directly correlates with prevention of paralysis, this research demonstrates that conventional clinical procedures hold promise for preventing paralysis from spinal cord injuries. One of the researchers collaborating on the study is MANICKAM MURUGANANDHAM of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Science Daily originates in Maryland.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070724113801.htm

Soap Opera Alumnus Is Interviewed (BuddyTV.com, July 24)
In a streaming video interview, soap opera actor Colin Egglesfiend of "All My Children" said he studied biology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with an emphasis in pre-med. TVBuddy bills itself as "the most popular insider's guide to TV."
http://www.buddytv.com/articles/all-my-children/exclusive-interview-colin-eggl-8601.aspx

UI Research Identifies Fibrosis Gene (HealthNewsDigest.com, July 24)
GARY W. HUNNINGHAKE
and MARTHA M. MONICK of the University of Iowa were among researchers who have identified a specific growth factor that appears to contribute to the development of pulmonary fibrosis, suggesting they may be close to finding a cause for even the most puzzling form of the lung disease.
http://www.healthnewsdigest.com/news/Research_270/Researchers_Discover_Market_for_Pulmonary_Fibrosis.shtml

Hourcade Comments On Jabberstamp (DailyIndia, July 24)
Jabberstamp is a new technology that allows embedding sound into traditional drawings to create an interactive story-game. "The main innovation comes in providing children with very familiar materials that they can play with and adding the technology on top of that," said JUAN PABLO HOURCADE, assistant professor of computer science at the University of Iowa.
http://www.dailyindia.com/show/159882.php/Now-kids-can-embed-sound-into-drawings-to-create-their-own-story-game

Weiner Comments On Research Budgets (Washington Post, July 24)
Stingy National Institutes of Health Budgets raise concerns in the research community. The average age for first-time NIH grant recipients has risen to 41.7 from 34.2 since 1970. "Our biggest concern," said GEORGE WEINER, director of the University of Iowa's cancer center "is that these people are going to give up on a research career."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/23/AR2007072301364.html

Weiner: NIH Cuts Reduce Number Of Researchers (Washington Post, July 24)
A story about continuing federal cuts to National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants notes that when the NIH cannot afford continued support even for proven research in areas such as Alzheimer's disease and asthma, less funding flows to the one- to five-year research project grants that are the agency's primary mechanism for supporting new ideas and helping faculty members start their careers. The average age for first-time NIH grant recipients has risen to 41.7 from 34.2 since 1970. "Our biggest concern," GEORGE WEINER, director of the University of Iowa's cancer center, told the Daily Iowan last year, "is that these people are going to give up on a research career."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/23/AR2007072301364.html

Bell: Many Premature Babies Function Well Growing Up (Home News Tribune, July 24)
A story about the challenges faced by extremely premature babies as they grow up notes about half will have a mild handicap, such as a learning disability, often not apparent until they're in school. "These kids do tend to be smaller than their peers, especially skinny, but most of them are functioning in regular classrooms, and the families are glad to have them," says University of Iowa pediatrician EDWARD BELL, who created the "tiniest babies" registry after the parents of his smallest patient asked whether he knew of any others that size. The News Tribune is published in New Jersey.
http://www.thnt.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070724/LIFE07/707240401/-1/LIFE03

Dunnwald Dispels Skin Cancer Myths (Drugtopics.com, July 24)
According to MARTINE DUNNWALD, Pharm.D., Ph.D., one of the biggest misconceptions is that a suntan, rather than sunburn, cannot lead to skin cancer. "Tanning beds increase the risk of skin cancer, and every college student and tanning bed customer should know it," said Dunnwald, who is an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Confusion abounds when it comes to skin cancer and many myths and misconceptions have evolved over the years.
http://www.drugtopics.com/drugtopics/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=441280

UI Track Coach Grant Dies Of Cancer (Jamaica Gleaner News, July 24)
Former Jamaican athlete JAMES 'JIMMY' GRANT lost a two-year battle with cancer yesterday in Iowa. Grant, who represented Jamaica at the 1966 Commonwealth Games in Kingston, was head coach of the University of Iowa's women's track and field team. The Gleaner News is published in Kingston, Jamaica.
http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20070724/sports/sports3.html

UI Writing Programs Ranks In Top 10 (Tallahassee Democrat, July 24)
A story about Florida State University's writing program being ranked as a top 10 writing program by The Atlantic notes that other schools on the list include the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.tallahassee.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070724/NEWS01/707240340/1010/NEWS01

Story Cites UI Gatorade Study (ProductReviews.net, July 24)
Football players in the NFL drink roughly 6200 gallons of Gatorade in one season. However research shows the Gatorade rots your teeth more than Coke and Red Bull. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers covered extracted teeth with nail polish. They left bare two patches on each tooth, one on the enamel and one on the root. Then they dunked the teeth in test tubes filled with regular Coke, Diet Coke, Gatorade, Red Bull, or 100% apple juice. Product Reviews is published in the United Kingdom.
http://www.product-reviews.net/2007/07/24/nfl-football-players-drink-6200-gallons-of-gatorade/

Retailers Offer Tips To Student Consumers (MarketWatch, July 24)
Online or at the counter, retailers across the industry have created lists of must-have items for college life. Retailers want you to shop them to stock up the bedroom, the bathroom, the backpack and even the medicine cabinet. Karen Anderson found out the hard way that university-backed packages from outside vendors are not always what they're cracked up to be. Stymied by the extra-long fit for sheets on twin beds, she was pleased to find a company endorsed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that would provide all the necessary bedding at one affordable price. "It was a good price and certainly fit the bill of what she would need in one easy order," she said of her daughter Katie's bedding package.
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/oh-things-first-time-college-bound-students/story.aspx?guid=%7BAFCD9631%2D172A%2D4AB6%2D8941%2D575737A89A20%7D

Columnist Comments On Iowa Prisons (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 24)
Only about 2 percent of Iowa's population is African-American, but blacks are 13.6 times more likely than whites to be imprisoned there, according to statistics were released last week by the Sentencing Project. "One of my four brothers graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but being an African-American male, I don't think I want to spend too much time in the Hawkeye State," commented the columnist. The column also appeared in the TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT in Florida.
http://www.philly.com/inquirer/opinion/20070724_Under_the_Sun___Stuffing_prisons_with_black_men_is_not_the_way_to_reduce_crime.html

School Bent Rules To Get Aid, Officials Say (New York Times, July 23)
After the Center for Career Training lost its accreditation and access to federal aid in 2002, Robert A. Berger reopened it under a new name -- Roberts Business Institute -- in the same place with the same teachers and students and a new application for money. Federal officials characterized the change as an attempt to get around regulations. And as he waited for approval, Roberts officials filled in names of other universities -- including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Phoenix -- on their students' financial aid forms, according to complaints filed with the state.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/23/nyregion/23school.html

Fuortes: Ames Lab Workers May Have Been Exposed To Thorium (WQAD-TV, July 23)
A federal agency is recommending former employees who renovated the Ames Laboratory decades ago be added to an existing list of workers who were likely exposed to radiation. LAURENCE FUORTES, a University of Iowa professor, says those who helped renovate Wilhelm Hall beginning in 1955 may've been exposed to residual thorium -- a highly radioactive element. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6825792&nav=1sW7

UI Started Prediction Markets (GreatReporter.com, July 23)
As presidential candidates crisscross the country this spring seeking votes and campaign cash, they aren't the only ones chasing the early money in politics. Political prediction-market traders, a new breed of gamblers, are hoping to strike it big by betting on which candidates will be nominated. Although Intrade has emerged as the new leader in the growing prediction industry, a lower-stakes prediction market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has been popular among academics for the past two decades.
http://greatreporter.com/mambo/content/view/1469/1/

Greenberg Wins Culinary Competition (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 23)
BARRY GREENBERG
, executive chef at the University of Iowa Memorial Union, was the top honoree at the Culinary Challenge of the National Association of College and University Food Services.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i47/47a04001.htm

Knecht Is 'Turnaround CIO' (Computer World, July 23)
TERRY KNECHT
, who has led IT turnarounds at several companies, is currently CIO of the University of Iowa Foundation. Knecht is one of a particular breed of CIO who moves from one difficult situation to the next, often jumping from industry to industry, and usually staying in a job only two to three years. "You have to establish key pieces of your program before the CEO loses faith or interest," Knecht says. "You have less than a year."
http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=297358&source=rss_topic14

Illinois Governor Supports Project 3000 (Chicago Tribune, July 23)
Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich has a plan to create state assistance for youngsters afflicted with the rare disease that is affecting the 4-year-old daughter of Chicago Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee. "Project 3000" was launched in 2006 when Lee and Boston Celtics CEO/co-owner Wyc Grousbeck, each of whom has a child with LCA (Leber's Congenital Amaurosis), created a partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to advance scientific understanding of this genetic eye disease and to work toward a cure.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/printedition/cs-mitchell-wood23jul23,1,6437865.story?coll=cs-sports-print

Redlawsk Comments On Social Conservatives (Real Clear Politics, July 23)
None of the front-running GOP candidates has captured the minds of Iowa's social conservatives, a population that comprises a majority of the caucus-going population. Social conservatives, says University of Iowa Professor DAVID REDLAWSK, "see the three frontrunners as not necessarily one of them." Real Clear Politics originates in Chicago.
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2007/07/huckabee_brownback_and_the_rac.html

Williams Teaches Art In Prisons (American Artist, July 22)
More and more artists are venturing into jails and prisons, gaining teaching experience and striving to make a difference. One of the benefits of these types of programs is that inmates are acquiring skills and discipline that may offer an avenue of self-expression other than violence. "People who do well in art classes gain confidence and take other classes, which is important because most inmates have very little education," says RACHEL MARIE-CRANE WILLIAMS, a painter and art professor at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, who has taught in prisons since the early 1990s. "These skills offer other outlets for anger and motivate them to change their lives." The media outlet is based in New York, N.Y.
http://www.myamericanartist.com/2007/07/bringing-art-be.html

Colangelo Book Praised (Associated Content, July 22)
A column is devoted to praising the "Handbook of Gifted Education," edited by NICHOLAS COLANGELO, the Myron & Jacqueline Blank Professor of Gifted Education and the Director of The Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development at The University of Iowa. Associated Content is a user-generated news site.
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/314726/handbook_of_gifted_education_tops_in.html

UI Alumna Keeps Eye On Hollywood (San Diego Union Tribune, July 22)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
alumna Martha Lauzen, a faculty member at San Diego State University, produces annual reports on the status of women in the TV and motion picture industries.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20070722-9999-lz1a22view.html

UI Quill & Scroll Judged Essay Contest (Coloradoan, July 22)
Olive Garden's Pasta Tales contest was designed to encourage young writers to express themselves and improve their writing skills. Entries were judged on creativity, adherence to theme, organization, grammar, punctuation and spelling by Olive Garden and the Quill and Scroll Society of the School of Journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This information was included in a story about a Colorado girl who was one of the winners.
http://www.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070722/LIFESTYLE/707220341

Squire Comments On Edwards' Iowa Campaign (The New York Times, July 22)
John Edwards built his campaign strategy on the belief that a victory in the Iowa caucuses would propel him to front-runner status and position him well for New Hampshire and the crush of Feb. 5 primaries. Statewide polls that often placed him at the top of the pack here suggested that his hard work in Iowa had paid off. "John Edwards cannot take this state for granted," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa and the author of "The Iowa Caucuses and the Presidential Nominating Process." "He has every reason to be concerned that in the next five months Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama will pass him," Squire said. "They are getting more attention and they have a celebrity that he cannot match."
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/22/us/politics/22edwards.html

Educator Is UI Alumna (Lancaster Intelligencer Journal, July 22)
A profile of Pennsylvania educator Daphna Ben-Chaim notes that she is an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she received a doctorate focusing on dramatic theory.
http://local.lancasteronline.com/4/207140

Morrissy Publishes Review (Irish Times, July 21)
MARY MORRISSY
, a novelist and short story writer teaching in the University of Iowa's writing program in Ireland, reviews the new novel by Pat Barker. The story is republished here on the Web site of Calibre Micro Times.
http://calibre.mworld.com/m/m.w?lp=GetStory&id=262378341

Squire Comments On Nevada Fundraising (Las Vegas Sun, July 20)
Nevada not only snuck in between the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primaries, but the state has produced a burst of fundraising greater than that in the two traditional first-in-the-nation political tests. "Iowans tend to be tight with their money altogether," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa and a caucus expert. "They are probably more likely to commit their time and efforts to campaigns than their wallets."
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/sun/2007/jul/20/566625575.html

Green Is Glad Arming Police Is Being Considered (Argus Leader, July 20)
Public safety directors from Iowa's three public universities say they support arming campus police but believe the decision should be made by the Iowa Board of Regents. "They are trained police professionals," said CHUCK GREEN, director of public safety at University of Iowa. "I am grateful the issue is being talked about." The Argus Leader is published in Sioux Falls, SD.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070720/NEWS/70720003/1001

Colemans Endow Lecture Series At UNI (WLNS, July 20)
University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman and her husband Kenneth have given $100,000 to the University of Northern Iowa. The money will finance an annual lecture in chemistry at the Cedar Falls school to honor Leland Wilson, Mary Sue Coleman's father, who taught there. Coleman was UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president from 1995 to 2002. WLNS is located in Lansing, Mich.
http://www.wlns.com/Global/story.asp?S=6818317&nav=5D7v

UI Takes In Record Funding  (University Business, July 20)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reported the largest take ever in external funding and grants for the fiscal year that just ended. The $382.2 million in grants and contracts for research, education and service during fiscal 2007, which ended June 30, is a 4.8 percent increase from 2006 and an all-time record, the school said. UI faculty members are the primary source for generating the funding stream, submitting applications and proposals to a variety of agencies.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=13786

Former UI Faculty Member's Art Opens Gallery (County Courier, July 19)
Art by Susan Abbott, who taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is part of "New Vistas," the debut exhibition at the Bryan Memorial Gallery in Vermont.
http://www.thecountycourier.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=4055&Itemid=

Agee Is UI Alumna (St. Paul Pioneer-Press, July 19)
A feature about Jonis Agee's new novel, "The River Wife," notes that Agee is an alumna of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Agee taught in the Twin Cities for 20 years.
http://www.twincities.com/ci_6415584?source=rss%20&nclick_check=1

Ex-Regent Calls For UI Dean To Be Fired (KEYC TV, July 19)
A former president of the Iowa Board of Regents is calling for a dean at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to be fired for turning down a $15 million gift. The gift is from Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. The call for the dean of public health to be fired came after he and other college faculty members approved a resolution saying they didn't want the college to be named after Wellmark, Iowa's largest health insurance company. The TV station is based in Mankato, Minn.
http://www.keyc.tv/article/view/5669/

Prolonged Search Cost $314,000 (Chronicle Of Higher Education, July 19)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S recently completed presidential search cost $314,000, according to the Iowa City Press-Citizen. The lengthy process that culminated in the hiring of Sally Mason, Purdue University's provost, included two rounds stretched over 17 months. Although many variables can drive up the cost of a presidential search, the typical range for a research university is $90,000 to $150,000, a search consultant says.
http://chronicle.com/news/article/2712/prolonged-search-for-new-president-at-u-of-iowa-ran-up-314000-bill

UI Alumna Honored In The Philippines (Philippine Daily Inquirer, July 19)
The planning for the University of the Philippines Centennial in 2008 is in full swing. As with most centennial observances, there will be lots of celebration and honors for UP alumni of distinction over the years. Dr. Cleofe Bacungan's name is synonymous with the Philippine Science High School and the PSHS Foundation, serving both with passion for 35 years. After getting her Ph.D. in science education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she joined the fledgling PSHS, eventually becoming its director for the next 19 years.
http://opinion.inquirer.net/inquireropinion/columns/view_article.php?article_id=77723

Colleges Respond To Requests (Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, July 19)
Many college police departments post daily reports online, including names, and will respond to requests for information about people. Universities that receive federal funding must provide timely notice of crime that occurs on or near campus, says Gene Deisinger, commander with the Iowa State University police. DAVID VISIN with the University of Iowa police says his department responds to information requests daily, mostly on ex-students who are applying for sensitive government jobs or the military. The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle is located in New York.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070719/LIVING/707190339/1032

Tournament Benefits Project 3000 (Chicago Tribune, July 19)
The Kerry Wood Strike Zone Celebrity Bowling Tournament will be Sunday, July 22, at 10pin Bowling Lounge in Chicago. Proceeds will go to "Project 3000," a venture launched in 2006 by Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee and Boston Celtics CEO/co-owner Wyc Grousbeck, each of whom has a child with a genetic eye disease known as Leber's congenital amaurosis. Project 3000 is a partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to advance scientific understanding and research and to work toward a cure for the disease.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/whitesox/cs-070718mitchell,1,6824096.column?coll=cs-whitesox-headlines

UI's WiderNet Brings 'Internet In A Box' To Africa (allAfrica.com, July 18)
Since the year 2000, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has been trying to bring the benefits of the Internet to parts of the world where access is minimal and/or expensive. The university's WiderNet Project manages the eGranary Digital Library, which places Web resources on a server on university campuses in developing countries that have little or no Internet connectivity. Based at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the eGranary Digital Library manually updates its library at least twice each year on campus intranets in Africa, India, Bangladesh, Azerbaijan and Haiti.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200707181318.html

Potter, Jeweler Attended UI (Santa Fe New Mexican, July 18)
In a profile of Brigid Curran of Santa Fe, N.M., it's noted that the potter and jeweler attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I wanted to study with a famous potter, but the term had already started, so he let me drop into his classes and I worked with him two years," she said.
http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/64998.html

UI Draws $382 Million In Grants And Contracts (WQAD-TV, July 18)
Iowa's three public universities collected more than $683 million in grants and contracts for research, education and other services last fiscal year. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA drew a record $382 million in state, federal and corporate grants and contracts. The 2007 total marked a nearly five percent increase over 2006. The TV station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6807737&nav=1sW7

Redlawsk: Conservatives Split On Presidential Candidates (Daily Herald, July 18)
The response of University of Iowa political scientist DAVID REDLAWSK to the latest Associated Press-Ipsos poll -- showing that nearly a quarter of Republicans are unwilling to back the party's top-tier presidential hopefuls, while "Democrats are reasonably comfortable with the range of choices" -- was widely reported for the second day in row. The Daily Herald is based in suburban Chicago. This Associated Press story was published by THE BOSTON HERALD, the LOS ANGELES TIMES, CNN, the SHANGHAI DAILY, USA TODAY, CBS NEWS, FOX NEWS, THE HOUSTON CHRONICLE, THE TIMES OF INDIA, THE GREENVILLE (S.C.) NEWS, and dozens of other news organizations.
http://www.dailyherald.com/news/illinoisstory.asp?id=332390

Story Features UI's eGranary Digital Library (Newsblaze.com, July 18)
Since the year 2000, the University of Iowa has been trying to bring the benefits of the Internet to parts of the world where access is minimal and/or expensive. The university's WiderNet Project manages the eGranary Digital Library, which places Web resources on a server on university campuses in developing countries that have little or no Internet connectivity. Based at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the eGranary Digital Library manually updates its library at least twice each year on campus intranets in Africa, India, Bangladesh, Azerbaijan and Haiti. The eGranary grew out of the experience of CLIFF MISSEN, a Fulbright scholar in Nigeria, who in 1999 witnessed how difficult it was for librarians to get good, fresh information into a patron's hands. Missen, who now serves as co-director of WiderNet, started taking compact discs with information to the Nigerian university where he was teaching. That led to the concept of the eGranary. NEWS BLAZE is based in Orange County, Calif.
http://newsblaze.com/story/20070718064841tsop.nb/newsblaze/TOPSTORY/Top-Stories.html

University of Iowa Faculty to Rethink Naming (University Business, July 18)
Talks between Wellmark and the University of Iowa about naming the College of Public Health may not be dead after all. Public health faculty held an emergency meeting with UI interim President GARY FETHKE at 9 a.m. Monday in the General Hospital Bean Conference Room to discuss reigniting a $15 million deal that would give Wellmark naming rights. The controversial naming deal appeared finished last week when faculty rejected a deal and Wellmark withdrew its offer. "The faculty gratefully recognizes the unique and generous gift offer from the Wellmark Foundation. The faculty resolves to move forward and consider this naming gift at a collegiate faculty meeting early in the academic year," stated a resolution that was overwhelmingly approved Monday by a quorum of public health faculty. Fethke made a presentation and answered questions Monday about the naming. He has been a proponent of Wellmark's offer and said through a spokesman that he was happy the faculty were talking about it again.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=13762

Iowa Faculty Reconsider What's in a Name (Inside Higher Ed, July 18)
Earlier this month, professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA decided that they'd rather not work at the "Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield College of Public Health" -- even if it meant potentially losing a donation of $15 million, which the insurance company's nonprofit philanthropic arm promptly rescinded. But it looks like a significant proportion of the university's faculty members are having second thoughts. At a meeting on Monday morning, they passed another resolution, this time resolving to "move forward and consider this naming gift at a collegiate faculty meeting early in the [2007-8] academic year." What the resolution actually means, however, is up for debate. A name change for any reason would have to be approved by the governor-appointed Board of Regents -- not the college faculty, dean or even the university's interim president, Gary Fethke. Still, the university's governance tends to be collegial and consensus-based, and a faculty vote (like the last one explicitly rejecting a corporate name) can influence those who do have the power of approval.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/07/18/wellmark

Faculty To Reconsider Gift Proposal (InsuranceJournal.com, July 18)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will reconsider a proposal to rename its health college after Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, school officials said Monday. The announcement follows an initial vote earlier this month in which college faculty rejected Wellmark's offer to donate $15 million to the university if the insurance company could put its name on the UI's College of Public Health. Faculty cited concerns about the perceived conflict of interest and the potential impact on research.
http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/midwest/2007/07/18/81849.htm

Faculty Reconsiders Gift (The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 17)
In an about-face, faculty members at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have decided to reconsider the naming of the College of Public Health for an insurance company, after rejecting a $15-million donation last week from Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield that came with naming rights. According to the Des Moines Register, the college's faculty members sent a new resolution to Wellmark, the university's administration, and the Board of Regents president yesterday, stating that they would consider the naming gift at a meeting early in the academic year. Wellmark withdrew its $15-million donation offer after faculty members said naming the college after an insurance firm could pose ethical concerns and a conflict of interest. No word yet on whether the gift offer has been renewed.
http://chronicle.com/blogs/facevalue/index.php?id=257

Covington Comments On Obama Fundraising (Monday Morning, July 17)
Barack Obama, the 45-year-old Illinois senator, sent a surge of electricity through the Democratic race as he smashed party fundraising records and surpassed (Hillary) Clinton by around five million dollars in the latest three-month April-June accounting period. "The money has to be translated into poll numbers", said CARY COVINGTON, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "The acid test for him is to translate those dollars into poll support not just nationally but in (the) four core states. If those states start showing poll movement, that's what will be trouble for Clinton, but right now dollars are just dollars." MONDAY MORNING is based in Lebanon.
http://www.mmorning.com/ArticleC.asp?Article=4893&CategoryID=7

Schnoor Touts Ecological Lab's Value (Atlanta Journal Constitution, July 17)
Two leading environmental scientists told a congressional panel Tuesday that eliminating funding for an ecological lab that monitors the Energy Department's Savannah River nuclear site would be shortsighted and urged the government to reconsider its plans. On Tuesday, Ward Whicker, professor emeritus at Colorado State University, testified alongside Democratic Rep. John Barrow of Savannah and JERALD SCHNOOR, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research at the University of Iowa and editor of the academic journal Environmental Science and Technology. "My candid overall opinion is that the (lab) is providing the (Energy Department) and the nation with high quality research in a very cost effective manner," Schnoor said. This Associated Press story was also published by THE AUGUSTA (Ga.) CHRONICLE, THE COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER and EXAMINER.COM.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories/2007/07/17/nukeplant_0718.html

UI Technology Helps Design Low-Wake Ferry (Kitsap Sun, July 17)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA computer modeling will be used to design a low-wake ferry for the Seattle area. The low-wake boat would cost $3.5 million to $4 million, said Kitsap Transit executive director Richard Hayes. The KITSAP SUN is based in northwest Washington.
http://kitsapsun.com/news/2007/jul/17/fast-ferry-will-come-to-kitsap-for-research/

Fisher Cites Costs Of Economic Incentives (Business Week, July 17)
Business-development incentives, while hardly new, are proliferating as never before, and the dollar values are soaring. From New York to Washington State, IT, biotech, and financial-services companies have incited frenzied bidding for their business and the spirit-elevating buzz they bring. States and localities bruised by globalization view these knowledge-based fields as the foundation for economic rebuilding. Reliable current estimates of the number of deals don't exist, but those who study the field all agree that the total is rising. PETER S. FISHER, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa, pegs the aggregate value of incentives at about $50 billion a year.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_30/b4043066.htm

Candidates' Prospects Reflected In Polls (New York Times, July 17)
The latest Associated Press-Ipsos poll found that nearly a quarter of Republicans are unwilling to back top-tier hopefuls Rudy Giuliani, Fred Thompson, John McCain or Mitt Romney, and no one candidate has emerged as the clear front-runner among Christian evangelicals. In sharp contrast, the Democratic race remains static, with Hillary Rodham Clinton holding a sizable lead over Barack Obama. "Democrats are reasonably comfortable with the range of choices. The Democratic attitude is that three or four of these guys would be fine," DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political scientist. "The Republicans don't have that; particularly among the conservatives there's a real split. They just don't see candidates who reflect their interests and who they also view as viable. The ASSOCIATED PRESS appeared in several media outlets, including FOX NEWS and the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Presidential-Race-AP-Poll.htm

Health Study On Hog Lots Noted (Vernon County Broadcaster, July 17)
In 2002 Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA conducted a joint health study of factory farm facilities, such as that proposed in Vernon County, Wis. It found that the manure pits become anaerobic and putrid, polluting the air with particulate matter and many gases, including ammonia and hydrogen sulfide. The study said these gases can lead to a wide range of health complaints ranging from nausea, headaches, diarrhea to even life-threatening pulmonary edema. The newspaper is published in Wisconsin.
http://www.vernonbroadcaster.com/articles/2007/07/17/news/00lead.txt

Editorial Notes UI College Of Public Health (Tampa Tribune, July 17)
In an editorial it is noted that the University of South Florida turned down a $3.45 million deal to rename the Sun Dome arena for a student loan company led by a man with a felony record. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the College of Public Health turned down a $15 million donation from Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield because the university (faculty) considered it a conflict of interest that could hurt its credibility. The newspaper originates from Tampa, Fla.
http://www.tbo.com/news/opinion/editorials/MGB8M1HP74F.html

UI: Where Great Writers Are Made (The Atlantic Online, July 16)
The Iowa Writers' Workshop can be found in a quaint wooden house at the north end of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus. The workshop's brand-new and clean-lined Glenn Schaeffer Library adjoins the house in the rear, as a fashionable offspring might flank a more elegantly dressed parent. In the library's Frank Conroy Reading Room, which overlooks the gray waters of the Iowa River, are tall, glassed bookcases containing some 3,000 volumes published by graduates of the workshop since it began in 1936.
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/prem/200708/edward-delaney-mfa

Skinstad Comments On Drug Use Study (Orlando Sentinel, July 16)
One in 12 full-time workers in the United States acknowledges having used illegal drugs in the past month, the government reports. The latest study comes from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, an agency within the Health and Human Services Department. ANNE SKINSTAD, a researcher and clinical psychologist, called the survey's results "very worrisome" because there are fewer treatment programs than there used to be to assist employees and employers with a dependence on drugs. However, testing programs for drug use are fairly prevalent, with 48.8 percent of full-time workers telling the government that their employers conducted testing for drug use. "I used to train supervisors to detect chronic use and intervene as early as possible, and that is a very good, constructive way rather than firing people," said Skinstad, an associate professor and director of the Prairielands Addiction Technology Transfer Center at the University of Iowa. "Some employers want drug testing. I'm not sure that's the way I would like to go. What I think I would like to focus on is employee performance." The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared in the BOSTON GLOBE, NEWSDAY (N.Y), TIME, DALLAS MORNING NEWS, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, and several other media outlets. The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/business/orl-drugs071607,0,3375503.story?coll=orl-ent-morenav-movies

Bowlsby Ushers In Change At Stanford (San Jose Mercury News, July 16)
In his first year on the job, Stanford Athletic Director Bob Bowlsby made two very public moves. He fired football coach Walt Harris after a dismal season and suspended legendary men's swimming coach Skip Kenney for removing names and records of five athletes from school media guides. But much of Bowlsby's impact has come behind the scenes. Since arriving from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last July, he has ushered Cardinal athletics into the 21st century. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.mercurynews.com/sports/ci_6385607?nclick_check=1

Study Examines Negative Talk Among Girls (ABC11-TV.com, July 16)
Girls who dish to their friends about their problems may actually be increasing their misery by doing so. Such are the findings of a study released Sunday, in which researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia found that "co-rumination" -- in other words, excessively discussing problems with close friends -- appears to increase anxiety and depression in young and adolescent girls. Psychology experts grappled over exactly how the findings should be interpreted. "It should be noted that this is shows a co-occurrence of two behaviors . . . and not a causal relationship," said DR. CHRIS OKIISHI, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "In other words, this study does not show that one causes the other -- just that they occurred at the same time." ABC 11 is based in North Carolina. http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/story?section=eye_on_health&id=5480211

Interim Provost At Purdue Named (Chicago Tribune, July 16)
Purdue University President France Cordova appointed veteran Purdue administrator Victor Lechtenberg as interim provost to replace Sally Mason, who is leaving Purdue to become president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Cordova said she plans a national search for a new provost, who oversees the academic programs.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/indiana/chi-ap-in-purduepresident,1,1036420.story

UI Presidential Searches Cost $315,000 (University Business, July 16)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will pay about $315,000 for the recently concluded presidential search -- a cost inflated by needing a second search committee after the first batch of finalists was rejected. The second search, which began in January and concluded last month with the hire of Sally Mason, should total nearly $82,000, school officials said. The initial search cost the school $233,000.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=13749

Menezes Chosen For Delicate Surgery (Merced Sun-Star, July 16)
Teenager Courtnie Frade, who suffers from two rare brain anomalies, is traveling from California to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for three brain surgeries by Dr. ARNOLD MENEZES, who has written textbooks on the procedures she requires. The newspaper is based in California.
http://www.mercedsunstar.com/life/story/13788914p-14367942c.html

Okiishi Comments On Co-rumination Study (ABC, July 16)
"Co-rumination" -- excessively discussing problems with close friends -- appears to increase anxiety and depression in young and adolescent girls, according to a new study. But, "It should be noted that this shows a co-occurrence of two behaviors... and not a causal relationship," said Dr. CHRIS OKIISHI, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "In other words, this study does not show that one causes the other -- just that they occurred at the same time."
http://www.abcnews.go.com/Health/Depression/story?id=3376147&page=1

Skinstad Comments On Worker Drug Use (USA Today, July 16)
One in 12 full-time workers in the United States acknowledges having used illegal drugs in the past month, the government reports. ANNE SKINSTAD, a researcher and clinical psychologist, called the survey's results "very worrisome" because there are fewer treatment programs than there used to be to assist employees and employers with a dependence on drugs. "I used to train supervisors to detect chronic use and intervene as early as possible, and that is a very good, constructive way rather than firing people," said Skinstad, an associate professor and director of the Prairielands Addiction Technology Transfer Center at the University of Iowa. "Some employers want drug testing. I'm not sure that's the way I would like to go. What I think I would like to focus on is employee performance."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-07-16-drug-use_N.htm

IEM Recognized As Leading Market (Online Opinion, July 16)
An editorial comparing polls with prediction markets, notes, "The Iowa Electronic Market, established by political scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988, is perhaps the world's best known election market." Online Opinion originates in Australia.
http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=5995

Harvard Exhibition Honors UI Grad (Art Daily, July 16)
An exhibition at Harvard University honors Chu-tsing Li, who is one of the pioneers in the study of modern and contemporary Chinese ink paintings. He holds a master's degree in English literature and a doctorate in art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, combining interests in both Chinese and western art. He taught at the UI for 10 years, from the mid-1950s through the mid-1960s. Art Daily originates in Mexico.
http://www.artdaily.com/section/news/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=21012

UI Study: Women Rule The House (Ellwood City Ledger, July 15)
"A team of academic researchers spent two years and a whole lot of money figuring out something that any married woman could have told you in about 10 seconds, and for free: The ladies rule," writes Larissa Theodore. "At least, that is, when it comes to home life. While some four decades after the start of the women's liberation movement, women still face lower pay, glass ceilings and residual condescending attitudes in the professional sphere, a two-year study out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA proves they have more power at home." This syndicated story is appearing widely. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.ellwoodcityledger.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=18589961&BRD=2724&PAG=461&dept_id=563781&rfi=6

UI Search Cost Revealed (Omaha World-Herald, July 15)
The search for a new UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president cost the institution $315,000.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2798&u_sid=10078906&u_rss=1&

Redlawsk Responds To Firefighters Video (US News, July 15)
Last week, when the International Association of Fire Fighters released a video critical of Rudy Giuliani's 9/11 performance, his campaign was worried enough to dispatch a small army of high-level supporters and former city officials to defend the candidate. "If there's an organization with the kind of public support and image that could break through Giuliani's image, it's the firefighters," says DAVE REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/news/articles/070715/23giuliani.htm

Squire: McCain Campaign Is Throwing Off Parts (Omaha World-Herald, July 15)
The departure of John McCain's campaign manager and senior strategist have rocked his campaign. "This is a campaign organization that should have been hitting on all cylinders, not throwing off parts," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It is becoming harder and harder to concoct a scenario where McCain pulls out the nomination." The story came from Bloomberg News.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2835&u_sid=10078565&u_rss=1

UI Golf Course Study Cited (Newsday, July 15)
Perfect lawns, achieved with herbicides, pesticides and fertilizers, can pose both environmental and health hazards. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study in the mid-1990s found that golf course superintendents across the country died from cancer -- particularly in the lung and brain -- far more often than the general population. This story was picked up by AP and MSNBC.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/ny-lilawn0715,0,3680551.story?coll=ny-li-bigpix

Sprince Explains Farm Hearing-Loss Study (saukvalley.com, July 15)
A new study reveals that not only are farmers already at a higher risk for hearing loss, but those with hearing aids have more work-related injuries. University of Iowa research found that farmers with difficulty hearing regular conversations were 80 percent more likely to be injured on the job. Working in a noise-intensive environment surrounded by heavy machinery and animals increases the probability a farmer will develop some degree of hearing loss over time. "The noise levels on farms are quite elevated," said Dr. NANCY SPRINCE, who led the study. "Livestock themselves can generate very high decibels." Saukvalley.com is based in Illinois.
http://www.saukvalley.com/articles/2007/07/15/news/local/306820776088255.txt

Former UI Announcer Is Named Conference Commissioner (The Spectrum, July 15)
Bob Hogue, who announced UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball and football broadcasts, and later became a state senator in Hawaii, has been named commissioner of the Pacific West Conference. The Spectrum is published in Utah.
http://www.thespectrum.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070715/SPORTS/707150319/1006

Thompson Candidacy Could Raise FCC Issues (Atlanta Journal Constitution, July 15)
If "Law and Order" star Fred Thompson declares his candidacy, will the FCC intervene? "Some Republican candidate like Ron Paul -- he's so wonderfully outspoken and he could probably use free [air] time," suggests NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a former FCC commissioner who teaches communications law at the University of Iowa. "He would go to TNT and say, 'You're putting on Fred Thompson, that triggers [the equal opportunity provision] and I demand my free time.'"
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/news/stories/2007/07/15/tvpols.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=15

Adamek Discusses Music Therapy (Express India, July 15)
Music Therapy is becoming more common in India, decades after it was embraced in the West. "Unlike speech and physical therapy, we are not looking at increasing music skills of the child with music therapy, where the goals are different," said MARY ADAMEK, the director of Clinical Activities in Music Therapy at the University of Iowa, in a recent US-India video conference. "We are not expecting the child to create music, but rather, to address their social, emotional, communication and cognitive needs. With the coming of advanced hearing aid implements, music therapy can even help deaf people. But as music therapy spreads across the world, it should be conducted while keeping local traditions and cultures in mind."
http://cities.expressindia.com/fullstory.php?newsid=246019

Pierce Is Grateful For Second Chance (InsideBayArea, July 15)
Pierre Pierce, who was dropped by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball program 2 1/2 years ago and spent 11 months in prison, is grateful for the opportunity to compete for a roster spot on the Golden State Warriors. This article originally appeared in the Contra Costa Times, and also appeared in the San Jose Mercury News.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/sports/ci_6381311

Gronbeck Comments On Huckabee Campaign (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, July 14)
Far behind in fundraising and name recognition, Mike Huckabee has put his wit to use on the television talk-show circuit. It has allowed him to reach a national audience as he continues his uphill presidential campaign. BRUCE GRONBECK, director of the Center for Media Studies and Political Culture at the University of Iowa, said Huckabee has been busy "defanging" himself. "He's working very hard to say, 'Look, I'm just kind of an ordinary guy with an ordinary set of concerns. I've got some basic commitments, but I'm not an evil, extreme, religious bigot,'" Gronbeck said.
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/195585/

VanBeek Warns About Nail Fungus (Articledashboard.com, July 14)
Getting a manicure or a pedicure is like playing Russian roulette. If you're not careful, you could end up with a nasty fungal nail infection that could ruin your nails. This warning comes from Dr. MARTA J. VANBEEK, assistant professor, of dermatology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, who said that while most nail salons conscientiously keep their places clean, some are perfect breeding grounds of stubborn fungi that can compromise your health. "Look at the salon with cleanliness in mind and ask yourself these questions: Are the stations clean? Does the nail technician wash her hands between clients? Are there dirty implements lying around? If the salon does not appear clean, then move on," VanBeek said.
http://www.articledashboard.com/Article/Nail-salons-may-spread-fungal-infections/257304

Squire Comments On McCain Strategy (Washington Post, July 14)
Dismissing dire forecasts of his political future, Republican presidential contender John McCain promised on Saturday to mount a comeback by taking his campaign directly to voters in the states that kick off the 2008 race. "There are just too many wheels coming off the bus all at once," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political analyst at the University of Iowa. "He's got himself in a box. He needs something very positive to happen in Iraq and that seems unlikely."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/14/AR2007071400686.html

Pelzer Included In Story On Erosion Of War Support (Washington Post, July 14)
DIXIE PELZER
, who works with student organizations at the University of Iowa, recently lost a son in Iraq. Her story was part of an analysis of the erosion of support for the war in small Midwest towns, which were once steadfast in their support for President Bush. This story is running widely.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/13/AR2007071302017.html?hpid=topnews%3Cbr%3E

Pomerantz Resigns From Committee (University Business, July 13)
Marvin Pomerantz, saying he was "embarrassed" that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Public Health rejected a plan to rename itself after Wellmark BlueCross and BlueShield, has resigned from the college's capital campaign committee. Pomerantz, a former Wellmark director, helped solicit the $15 million, five-year offer from the Wellmark Foundation. James Merchant, dean of the college, and public health faculty rejected the offer last Thursday, saying they didn't want to be named for an insurance company.
http://www.universitybusiness.com/newssummary.aspx?news=yes&postid=13739

UI's Kanna Sheds Insight On Wearing Of Hijab (Daily Star Egypt, July 13)
Norhan Mohammed, an 11-year-old student, loved participating in her school's swim team, but not anymore. She left the team in May 2006 after she put on a hijab (headscarf), which did not go with her swimsuit. Mohammed does not regret her decision to put on the hijab. She still has the same freedom as before, Mohammed says, only she covers her hair and wears long sleeves. Mohammed started wearing her hijab as protection when she entered puberty. Dr. AHMED KANNA, a University of Iowa post-doctoral fellow focused on Middle East politics and culture research, says that the intentions of wearing the hijab may vary from one person to another.
http://www.dailystaregypt.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=8174

UI Alumna Balances Theater And Karaoke (Bonita News, July 13)
Tammy Truitt, a former Miss Iowa, started putting on karaoke nights at bars and restaurants in Southwest Florida five years ago after making the big move from Davenport, Iowa, six years ago. The 34-year-old karaoke queen also performs in various productions for regional theater houses, Broadway Palm Dinner Theater and The Schoolhouse Theater. "I just needed a change," Truitt said of her second career as a karaoke emcee. Truitt graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, paid for by winning the state pageant, and received a communications degree in 1997 with the hopes of entering radio. "But I fell back in love with the stage," Truitt said. Bonita News is published in Bonita Springs, Fla.
http://www.bonitanews.com/news/2007/jul/13/music_spotlight_beauty_queen_balances_karaoke_and_/

Lovaglia Developed Athletic Performance Rate (Pegasus News, July 13)
The Student Athlete Performance Rate (SAPR) was developed by University of Iowa sociologist MICHAEL LOVAGLIA and University of Maryland professor Jeffrey Lucas in an effort to rank the best Division I football and men's basketball programs based on a combination of academic progress and athletic success. The two professors launched a web site detailing their study and listing their findings at www.bestschoolsforathletes.org. Pegasus News is published in Texas.
http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2007/jul/13/unt-football-ranks-1-sun-belt-academicathletic-bal/

UI Students Were Among 'Cedar Rapids 11' (Z Magazine, July 13)
Late last February, as the leading Democratic presidential campaigns set up shop across Iowa, Cedar Rapids Police arrested 11 Iowa activists, including seven UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students, for occupying the Cedar Rapids office of U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley. One of the protestors, UI graduate student Joshua Casteel, had received Grassley's 1998 nomination to attend the prestigious West Point military academy.
http://www.zmag.org/content/showarticle.cfm?SectionID=72&ItemID=13280

Survey Assesses Healthcare Access (Insurance Journal, July 13)
A new statewide survey shows that more Iowa children have health insurance than they did in 2000. The 2005 Iowa Child and Family Household Health Survey, which was released this week, was an attempt by the state to evaluate health status, access to health care and social environment of children in Iowa families. The report was a collaborative effort by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PUBLIC POLICY CENTER, the Iowa Department of Public Health, the University of Northern Iowa and the Iowa Child Health Specialty Clinics. Insurance Journal originates in California.
http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/midwest/2007/07/13/81585.htm

UI Music Graduate Profiled (Jazz Police, July 12)
An article profiles guitarist/composer John Penny, who earned a music degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Jazz Police originates in the Twin Cities.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/7124/115/

UI Alumnus Discusses Diversity (Diverse, July 12)
The current issue of Diverse Issues in Higher Education features a discussion with Cynthia E. Nance, who holds master's and law degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Last year she was appointed dean of the University of Arkansas School of Law. Diverse Issues in Higher Education originates in Virginia.
http://diverseeducation.com/artman/publish/article_8270.shtml

Popescu Interviewed About Treatment Disparities (WJLA, July 12)
Dr. IOANA POPESCU was interviewed about the recent University of Iowa study that documented a disparity in heart attack treatments for black and white patients: "We were able to document significant and persistent differences in treatment after heart attack for black and white patients." WJLA is a television station in the DC area.
http://news.wjla.com/news/stories/0607/430805.html

Wellmark Withdraws $15 Million Pledge (Philanthropy News Digest, July 12)
The Wellmark Foundation has withdrawn its $15 million pledge to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Public Health after the faculty and administration rejected a plan to rename the college after Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the DES MOINES REGISTER reports.
http://foundationcenter.org/pnd/news/story.jhtml;jsessionid=FP1YTW0FVITM3TQRSI4CGXD5AAAACI2F?id=182200040

UI's Fisher: Cost Of Wooing Google Is High (BusinessWeek, July 12)
States and cities are dangling ever-bigger inducements to attract companies, and the digital giant knows how to drive a hard bargain. Business-development incentives, while hardly new, are proliferating as never before, and the dollar values are soaring. Lenoir's courting of Google offers a case study of how elaborate the inducement ritual can get. Today, it's not just carmakers promising thousands of jobs apiece that are getting rich deals. From New York to Washington State, IT, biotech, and financial-services companies have incited frenzied bidding for their business and the spirit-elevating buzz they bring. PETER S. FISHER, a professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa, pegs the aggregate value of incentives at about $50 billion a year.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/07_30/b4043066.htm

Squire Says Giuliani Campaign Path Bucks Trend (Tucson Citizen, July 12)
Rudy Giuliani, taking advantage of an accelerated primary calendar, has adopted an unorthodox campaign itinerary en route to what he hopes will be the Republican presidential nomination. The former New York mayor is lavishing attention on Florida and California, two delegate-rich states with voters far more receptive to his moderate-to-liberal views. Advertising in Florida or California alone might cost as much as $5 million per state. Whether a Feb. 5 strategy will work is uncertain given the unknowns of the 2008 campaign, which is happening earlier and is the most contested in half a century. "It's a risky strategy," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It might even be more likely that things unfold in ways that are more familiar to us, and that people who do well in Iowa and New Hampshire will be catapulted to the front of the line."
http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/daily/opinion/57171.php

Pomerantz Resigns Fundraising Committee (Inside Higher Edication, July 12)
A major donor to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who helped solicit a recently aborted $15 million gift for the College of Public Health, has quit a committee charged with raising funds for that college. Faculty members objected to the gift from Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield because the college would have been named for the company, which has since withdrawn its offer. Marvin Pomerantz, the major donor, told the Iowa City Press-Citizen that College of Public Health Dean James Merchant, who shared his faculty's concerns, had "embarrassed me and embarrassed the university" with his "terrible insult" over a "magnanimous" gift offer.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/07/12/qt

Squire Says Flying Is Tough For Some Candidates (Indianapolis Star, July 11)
Flying with the general public can be a logistical nightmare "Oh boy, I'd love a plane," Republican presidential candidate Tom Tancredo says. Like other less-than-well-known presidential candidates, Tancredo has to get to his campaign events by flying commercially. The more popular candidates get to fly in corporate or charter jets. University of Iowa political science professor PEVERILL SQUIRE says flying with the general public puts struggling candidates at a disadvantage. This ASSOCIATED PRESS STORY also appeared in AERO-NEWS.NET.
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/C/CANDIDATES_COMMERCIAL_FLIGHTS?SITE=ININS&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Alumnus Is No. 2 Reviewer On Amazon.com (Post-Bulletin, July 11)
Seven years ago Lawrance Bernabo was an out-of-work college teacher from Duluth looking for something to keep his mind sharp while he searched for another job. Cruising the Web one day, he wandered onto Amazon.com and noticed a list of the site's most prolific customer reviewers. "I can do better than that," he thought, studying the 2,000 terse reviews of products posted by the person in the No. 1 spot. Today, Bernabo has given up his race for the top spot, content with his status as the No. 2 reviewer on the popular shopping Web site. He's posted thousands of reviews on everything from comic books to art posters to movies and even a set of coasters. He graduated from the University of New Mexico with degrees in political science and history. He continued his studies, earning a master's degree in speech, and then headed to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he received a doctorate in rhetorical studies. The newspaper is based in Rochester, Minn. The story was originally published in THE STAR-TRIBUNE of Minneapolis.
http://www.postbulletin.com/newsmanager/templates/localnews_story.asp?a=300382&z=2

Squire Comments On Candidate Travel (New York Times, July 11) Republican presidential candidate Tom Tancredo knows what he wants. "Oh boy, I'd love a plane," Tancredo said. It's not that the Colorado congressman is enamored with flying. In fact, he's spent enough time waiting to board planes to last a lifetime. And that's the problem. Tancredo, like the other lesser-known presidential candidates, must make his way to Iowa and other campaign stops by flying commercially. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said flying with the masses ultimately puts struggling candidates at even a greater disadvantage. "It just makes it that much more difficult," Squire said. "It means they'll probably be in fewer places than the top-tier candidates, and the physical toll it takes to fly commercially these days can't be discounted." The ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared on the Web sites of USA TODAY, the BOSTON GLOBE, CBS NEWS, SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, and the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Candidates-Commercial-Flights.html

Chicago TV Reporter Loses Job (Chicago Sun Times, July 11)
For more than a decade, she regularly handled the day's top story for WMAQ-Channel 5, from exclusives on crime cases to snowstorms where she'd don one of her signature winter hats. But by Tuesday afternoon, Amy Jacobson was out of a job as she became the lead story. Jacobsen, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was fired after a rival TV station filmed her going swimming with a source, an estranged husband of a missing Plainfield woman.
http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/463219,CST-NWS-amybio11.article

UI Web Site Details Sanskrit Studies (NetIndia123, July 10)
According to a list made available on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Web site, many institutions in the US and Europe offer Sanskrit studies. The page, http://myweb.uiowa.edu/pjai/Sanskrit/SanskritStudies.htm, is labeled "Academic Sanskrit Studies Around the World." http://www.netindia123.com/showdetails.asp?id=709080&cat=India&head=Sanskrit+gaining+popularity+in+US%2C+Europe

McGehee Studies Teen Driving Mistakes (CBS News, July 10)
You might wonder why a teenager would let you put a camera in his car. Even though this sort of camera is rolling all the time, it's not Big Brother. Its memory only hangs onto what happens immediately before and after some kind of driving event.  And those "events" are e-mailed to mom and dad, who review them with their teen. University of Iowa researcher DAN MCGEHEE says the videos provide a reality check for over-confident beginners. "This really shines a spotlight on their own driving and they can see themselves that they made some mistakes," McGehee says. And perhaps they learn from them. McGehee took 25 drivers who fell into two groups, those who drove "well" and rarely triggered the camera (about three times for every thousand miles driven) and those who triggered it a lot (nearly 19 times for every one thousand miles they drove). After seeing themselves, the "riskier" drivers improved by nearly 90 percent.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/07/10/eveningnews/main3039099.shtml

Alumna Comments On Veterans' Education Benefits (USA Today, July 10)
The GI Bill, the landmark federal law that has put millions of returning veterans through college or other training programs since 1944, still is available to the majority of today's veterans. The education benefit has grown more complicated over the years, and it does not cover as much as it once did. Tiffany Jenkins, 26, who earned a bachelor's degree in computer science last December from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, had to take out $11,000 in student loans to cover her final semester of college. Had she not been called up, Jenkins says she could easily have completed her degree. But her year working in a hospital in Iraq as part of her six-year term with the Iowa Army National Guard ate up three semesters of her schooling. She says the Guard should have at least extended her benefits for the amount of time that she was away. "I'd done my National Guard and enjoyed my service overseas as much as one could," says Jenkins. But instead of being thanked, "I'm actually being penalized."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2007-07-10-gi-bill-report_N.htm

Wellmark Withdraws $15 Million Donation To UI (The Chronicle, July 10)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's College of Public Health has lost a $15 million gift after the donor, the Wellmark Foundation, withdrew its offer when faculty members rejected a plan to name the college for Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, THE DES MOINES REGISTER reported on Monday. University trustees and other officials joined the faculty in criticizing the proposal as a likely conflict of interest, as well as a possible threat to research. John Forsyth, the chief executive of Wellmark, which is Iowa's largest private insurance company, said the gift would remain withdrawn until the university's criticism was replaced with "unwavering support."
http://chronicle.com/news/article/2658/insurer-tells-u-of-iowa-to-find-15-million-gift-someplace-else

UI Researchers Help Identify Scoliosis Gene (NewsRx.com, July 10)
Physicians have recognized scoliosis, the abnormal curvature of the spine, since the time of Hippocrates, but its causes have remained a mystery until now. For the first time, researchers have discovered a gene that underlies the condition, which affects about 3 percent of all children. The new finding lays the groundwork for determining how a defect in the gene -- known as CHD7 -- leads to the C- and S-shaped curves that characterize scoliosis. The gene's link to scoliosis was identified by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, working in collaboration with investigators at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, both in Dallas, Rutgers State University of New Jersey and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The group published its results in May in the American Journal of Human Genetics.
http://www.newsrx.com/articles/626998.html

Iowa City One Of 30 Best Towns In America (Outside magazine, August 2007)
In their annual survey of the best places to live, Outside magazine picked Iowa City as the best in the Midwest. "Surrounded by hills and bisected by the Iowa River, the liberal college town is or has been home to notable writers like 1978 Pulitzer Prize winner JAMES ALAN McPHERSON and the late Kurt Vonnegut, who penned part of the seminal 'Slaughterhouse-Five' here. The University of Iowa's nearly 30,000 students keep this oak-lined Pleasantville real, with six yoga studios, the famed Prairie Lights independent bookstore, and everything from Ethiopian cafes to grilled-cheese stands." The article is not yet available online.

Johnson: Caucus Goers Still Studying Candidates (Washington Times, July 10)
Forget the polls. Voters from across Iowa insist that the Democratic caucus here is a wide-open race. Iowans, who are showing up in record numbers for the nonstop visits from presidential hopefuls, plan to take their time before deciding which candidate to cast their vote for in the Jan. 14 caucus; and they're interested in more than just the three front-runners. Many from Oskaloosa to Iowa City say they are starting to seriously study the candidates and that they are open to anyone emerging the victor, even a certain former vice president. "Until we've met them two or three times face to face and talk to them, we aren't sure," said NICK JOHNSON, a former Federal Communications Commission commissioner who now teaches at the University of Iowa. "Between now and the January caucus, a lot can happen. Who stumbles and falls, who appears that nobody has even thought of."
http://washingtontimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070710/NATION/107090086/1001

Wellmark Withdraws $15 Million Gift Offer (Inside Higher Ed, July 10)
Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield has withdrawn a $15 million gift offer to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that was supposed to be linked to the naming of the College of Public Health for the company. Faculty members have been angry over the plan to name the college after a company, and have called on the university not to agree to such a change. Similar stories on the same topic appeared in UNIVERSITY BUSINESS and PHILANTHROPY NEWS DIGEST.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/07/10/qt

Workshop Alumnus To Build Tourist Lodge (Times Herald-Record, July 10)
A story about developer Kal Kabinoff, who wants to build a 40-room tourist lodge in the village of Harriman, N.Y., notes that he graduated from the prestigious Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.recordonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070710/NEWS/707100307/-1/NEWS

Alumnus Joins Planning Board (Naples News, July 10)
A story about John Goodrich, the newest member of the Estero Community Planning Panel in Florida, notes that he is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News is published in Florida.
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2007/jul/09/goodrich_steps_eslicks_replacement_tonights_ecpp_m/?breaking_news

Squire: Giuliani Strategy Is Risky (The Guardian, July 9)
Rudy Giuliani, taking advantage of an accelerated primary calendar, has adopted an unorthodox campaign itinerary en route to what he hopes will be the Republican presidential nomination. So while Republican rivals Mitt Romney and Sam Brownback were in Iowa last week, Giuliani visited a deli in Orlando, Fla., a town-hall meeting in Jacksonville, and a NASCAR race in Daytona Beach. The week before, he turned up at a bagel shop in Irvine, Calif. Whether a Feb. 5 strategy works is uncertain given the unknowns of the 2008 campaign, which is happening earlier and is the most contested in half a century. "It's a risky strategy," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "It might even be more likely that things unfold in ways that are more familiar to us, and that people who do well in Iowa and New Hampshire will be catapulted to the front of the line." The Guardian is published in the UK. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the OTTAWA (Canada) RECORDER, RALEIGH (N.C.) NEWS & OBSERVER, WASHINGTON POST, SEATTLE POST INTELLIGENCER, NORTH COUNTY TIMES (Calif.), SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE, DAYTONA BEACH NEWS JOURNAL, FOSTER'S DAILY DEMOCRAT (N.H.), CNN, WJLA-TV (Washington, D.C) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,,-6767608,00.html

Breakthrough May Produce Treatments (Medical News Today, July 9)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
researchers collaborated in groundbreaking research that will enable medicines to penetrate the blood brain barrier -- a superfine filter that prevents transport of harmful pathogens and beneficial drugs alike -- offering hope for more effective treatments for a variety of brain conditions.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=74487

Verses Provide Insight (Sunday Tribune, July 9)
A story about the upcoming publication of poems by Guantanamo inmates begins, "The words of the celebrated Pakistani poet were scratched on the sides of a Styrofoam cup with a pebble. Then, under the eyes of Guantanamo Bay's prison guards, they were secretly passed from cell to cell. When the guards discovered what was going on, they smashed the containers and threw them away, fearing that it was a way of passing coded messages. Fragments of these "cup poems" survived, however, and are included in an 84-page anthology entitled Poems from Guantanamo: the Detainees Speak, to be published later this year by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The verses provide a harrowing insight into the torments and fading hopes of the prisoners." The Sunday Tribune is published in California.
http://www.tribune.ie/article.tvt?_scope=Tribune/Tribune%20Review/Arts&id=72746&SUBCAT=Tribune/Tribune%20Review

Fat Dad Cites UI Research (San Diego Union-Tribune, July 9)
Columnist Michael Stetz laments, "My kid is making me fat," and continues, "According to a recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Michigan Health System study, adults who live with children are likely to chow down more fat then adults who live without children. The researchers estimate the amount of extra fat a parent eats in a week equals that found in a frozen pepperoni pizza. Gee, thanks kid."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20070709-9999-1m9fat.html

UI Alumna Documented Forgotten Films (The Southern, July 9)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
alumna Sally Shafto, executive director of the Big Muddy Film Festival, chronicles a forgotten corner of French film history in her new book, "The Zanzibar Films and the Dandies of May 1968." The Southern is published in Illinois.
http://www.southernillinoisan.com/articles/2007/07/08/lifestyles/life/20714877.txt

Center For Disability Assisted In Autism Case (Wall Street Journal, July 9)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CENTER FOR DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT
was consulted in a dispute between the parents of an autistic child and their school district. This story focuses on the difficulties faced when children with behavioral disabilities are mainstreamed.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118375070827459396.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

Bell Started "Tiniest Babies" Registry (USA Today, July 9)
University of Iowa pediatrician EDWARD BELL created the "tiniest babies" registry after the parents of his smallest patient asked whether he knew of any others that size.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2007-07-08-tiniest-babies_N.htm

Kaaret Comments On Black Hole Study (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, July 8)
Scientists have known for decades that black holes produce powerful jets of plasma, releasing energy into the universe at nearly the speed of light and fueling the formation of interstellar objects. Now, a new observation suggests that neutron stars, a smaller cousin of black holes, can produce relatively strong jets that rival black holes in power and efficiency. "We have to go back to the drawing board to figure out how these jets work since black holes are no longer the only game in town," said PHILIP KAARET, a researcher specializing in observing X-ray jets and associate professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa.
http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=629218

Kaboli Comments On Patients Who Don't Take Their Medicine (Therapeutics Daily, from the Star-Ledger, July 8)
PETER KABOLI
is a health-care researcher who wrestles with the paradox of patients who don't take their medicine. But he doesn't need to look further than his own mirror to get a quick fix on the problem. "I'm supposed to take a pill for my cholesterol, and sometimes I forget," confessed Kaboli, a doctor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa Medical School. Patients who fail to fill prescriptions or don't bother to refill them are the dirty little secret of the global health-care system.
http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=1420278&contentType=sentryarticle&channelID=26

Golfer Funds Cullen's Pancreatic Cancer Research (Toledo Blade, July 8)
When JOSEPH CULLEN, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics gastrointestinal surgeon, was seeking extra funding for his pancreatic cancer research, professional golfer Beth Bader and her sister Amy started the Susan L. Bader Foundation of Hope to raise the money, as a result of their mother's battle with the affliction.
http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070708/SPORTS05/70708009

Mumford Studies Newark Riots (Star-Ledger, July 8)
In "Newark: A History of Race, Rights and Riots in America" history professor KEVIN MUMFORD explores 20th-century racism in Newark, N.J., and the battle for integration by black activist groups like the Congress for Racial Equality and the NAACP. He is an associate professor of history and African-American studies at the University of Iowa.
http://www.nj.com/books/ledger/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/118386927094430.xml&coll=1

UI Gives Students Access To Candidates (Oaklawn Star, July 8)
John Mulrooney signed up for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Democrats with one goal: meet the next American president. Having a campus in the crucial early voting state of Iowa guaranteed that candidates would sweep through town.
http://www.starnewspapers.com/oaklawn/news/459417,081pw3.article

Campbell Team Finds Heart Muscle Repair Mechanism (Heartzine.com, July 7)
Researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered that the heart muscle has a specific mechanism for repairing itself. KEVIN CAMPBELL and his colleagues at UI had identified that the protein dysferlin plays a key role in the vital repair mechanism for skeletal muscle. They also found that dysferlin deficiency in humans can lead to faulty muscle membrane repair and cause three types of muscle dystrophy. The new study, conducted at the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine used laboratory mice to check the role of dysferlin in cardiomyopathy.
http://www.heartzine.com/620-Insufficient-Cell-Membrane-Repair-Causes-Heart-Disease.html

Mason Says Goodbye At Purdue (Journal and Courier, July 7)
The Purdue University board of trustees on Friday said goodbye to some of its key members. Provost SALLY MASON said goodbye to the board -- she will leave her position at Purdue to become the University of Iowa's 20th president. The Journal and Courier is published in Lafayette and West Lafayette, Indiana.
http://www.jconline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070707/NEWS0501/707070321/1152

UI Alumna Is Named Philippines "National Scientist: (The Inquirer, July 7)
Lourdes "Luly" Jansuy Cruz, who earned her master's degree and doctorate in Biochemistry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been conferred the rank and title of "National Scientist," the highest honor given to a man or woman of science in the Philippines. The Inquirer is published in Manila.
http://showbizandstyle.inquirer.net/lifestyle/lifestyle/view_article.php?article_id=75333

Andreasen Studied Connection Between Art And Madness (Guardian, July 7)
A new exhibition examines the possible connection between art and madness -- a question of abiding interest. NANCY ANDREASEN, chair of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine, studied 30 authors from the university's famous writers' workshop and discerned that artists, though prone to emotional disorders, do not have high rates of schizophrenia -- but their families do. The suggestion is that some features associated with schizophrenia, which haven't developed into a psychosis, may confer some kind of creative originality. The Guardian is published in the UK.
http://arts.guardian.co.uk/art/visualart/story/0,,2120670,00.html

Proposal To Rename Public Health College Explored (Inside Higher Ed, July 6)
You can watch a game at the Jones AT&T Stadium at Texas Tech University or hold the Bank of America deanship in the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. How long before you could attend the Time Warner School of Communication or the Microsoft College of Engineering? Some observers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are worried that such a landscape might not be far off. The university is in talks with a major Iowa health insurer, Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield, to accept a reported donation of $15 million from the company's associated nonprofit organization in return for possible naming rights to the eight-year-old College of Public Health.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2007/07/06/iowa

Gronbeck Comments On Cost Of TV Ads In Race (Centre Daily Times, July 6)
There were two object lessons this week in why money matters so much to political campaigns, in the persons of Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and John McCain. Romney, a former Massachusetts governor, outpaced all Republican rivals in amassing campaign cash so far this year, a total of $44 million. That includes almost $9 million of his own money. McCain, an Arizona senator, raised a disappointing $24.8 million during the same period. The disparity allowed Romney -- a little-known, one-term governor of a state considered outside the political mainstream -- to vault to front-running status in key early voting states. And it's why McCain -- an American hero, best-selling author and media darling -- struggles to keep his campaign afloat. "Romney is pounding news slots and the space between popular prime-time programming," said BRUCE GRONBECK, the director of the University of Iowa's Center for Political Studies and Media Culture. "That's costing real money." Centre Daily Times is based in State College, Pa.
http://www.centredaily.com/news/nation/story/145023.html

UI Research Finds Repair Mechanism In Heart Muscle (Science Daily, July 6)
During vigorous exercise, heart muscle cells take a beating. In fact, some of those cells rupture, and if not for a repair process capable of resealing cell membranes, those cells would die and cause heart damage (cardiomyopathy). Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine have discovered a specific repair mechanism in heart muscle and identified a protein called dysferlin that is critical for resealing heart muscle cell membranes.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070703171935.htm

Dreamers Dream Of Clinton-Obama Ticket During UI Visit (Union Leader, July 6)
Two Democratic front-runners came within 100 miles of each other this week in a long, hot day of Iowa barnstorming. But in the eyes of some supporters -- not to mention national observers -- Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama often seem even further apart. "I'm really torn between Obama and Hillary," said John Christenson, 70, a retired library director who caught Clinton's midday rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. The Union Leader is based in Manchester, N.H. This article also appeared in the WICHITA FALLS TIMES RECORD NEWS.
http://www.unionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=Dreamers+dream+of+Clinton-Obama+ticket&articleId=055dd04e-eb7c-4260-b21e-c72e0b6f16de

New Clubfoot Brace Builds On Ponseti's Method (Science Daily, July 5)
A new brace that maintains correction for clubfoot, a birth defect in which the foot is turned in toward the body, has shown better compliance and fewer complications than the traditional brace used to treat the condition. Matthew B. Dobbs, M.D., associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, designed the new dynamic brace, called the Dobbs brace, to allow active movement, preserve muscle strength in the foot and ankle and be less restrictive to the child than the traditional brace. Dobbs first treated children with clubfoot deformity using the Ponseti method. The treatment, developed in the 1950s by IGNACIO PONSETI, M.D., professor emeritus of orthopedics and rehabilitation at the University of Iowa, involves weekly casting and manipulation of the clubfoot soon after birth.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070628161441.htm

Andreasen Comments on Gender Differences (Discover Magazine, July 5)
An article that explores differences between men and women -- beyond the Mars-Venus stereotypes -- shows that it's not just the social conditioning we receive from the time we parachute down the birth canal that accounts for sex differences. Our brains are hardwired differently, and these anatomical variations in architecture and function illuminate some of the reasons why men and women seem to come from different planets. Men and women, to be sure, "are more alike than they're different, and even when there are variations, there is a significant overlap between the sexes," says NANCY ANDREASEN, a psychiatrist and neuroimaging expert at the University of Iowa.
http://discovermagazine.com/2007/brain/she-thinks

Squire Comments On Clinton's Iowa Campaign (New York Times, July 5)
Former President Bill Clinton accompanied his wife, Sen. Hillary Clinton, on several recent campaign stops in Iowa. The Clintons' political stagecraft -- and their goal of shifting the spotlight to her -- has been a work in progress since her presidential campaign began in January. This week, her husband's first campaign jaunt on her behalf showed him in stages of adjustment -- relaxed and jokey at times, a bit unpolished at others. The president is keeping himself on a very, very short leash campaigning with her," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University Of Iowa, after watching them at a rally on campus Tuesday. "I thought him leaving the stage was very telling. The campaign must be conscious that even if she gets up there and does well, she will never be as good as he is. He is the best at this." That said, Professor Squire added: "I thought they did pretty well together. I bet people leaving the rally had a very clear idea of which one of them was running for president." The article also appeared in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/05/us/politics/05clinton.html

Clinton Speaks At UI (Washington Post, July 5)
In a photo caption, it's noted that Democratic presidential hopeful U.S. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., spoke at a Rally for Change at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Tuesday, July 3, 2007, in Iowa City, Iowa. The photo appeared in several other publications.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/04/AR2007070400404.html

Clintons Campaign In Iowa (The Independent, July 5)
Sen. Hilary Clinton wrapped up a three-day tour through Iowa, which in seven months will become the first state to cast votes to choose the 2008 presidential nominees. Her husband, former President Bill Clinton, showed uncharacteristic restraint by introducing his wife on each occasion and making sure to melt from the stage after speaking for just five or 10 minutes. It remains a tricky challenge for the Clinton camp: how to use the former president without allowing him to upstage the candidate. "We sort of changed roles now," Bill Clinton said at an outdoor rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I'm kind of out of politics and I'm a little rusty, so you'll have to forgive me." The newspaper is based in the United Kingdom.
http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/article2737121.ece

Niebyl Advises On Dressing During Pregnancy (Parents.com, July 5)
In an article offering advice on dressing during pregnancy, it's noted that comfort is key and that women's breasts will change too. "One of the more obvious changes in early pregnancy is tenderness and, later on, enlargement," says JENNIFER NIEBYL, MD, head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, in Iowa City. "If you don't get proper support, you're going to be very uncomfortable."
http://www.parents.com/parents/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/parents/story/data/1182537362968.xml

College Of Public Health Naming Considered (San Diego Union-Tribune, July 4)
The University of Iowa and Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield are talking about naming the school's new College of Public Health building. Interim university President GARY FETHKE says it would be unusual to name a college after a company. They're usually named after people who have made significant contributions. The Iowa Board of Regents must approve any such naming.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/nation/20070704-2346-statespotlight.html

Clinton, Obama Barnstorm Iowa (Rocky Mountain News, July 4)
Two Democratic front-runners came within 100 miles of each other Tuesday in a long, hot day of Iowa barnstorming. But in the eyes of some supporters -- not to mention national observers -- Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama often seem even further apart. As the candidates came close to crossing paths in eastern Iowa, some undecided Democrats in the crowds said they hoped the rivalry would not intensify between now and January, when the first votes are cast at Iowa caucuses. "I'm really torn between Obama and Hillary," said John Christenson, 70, a retired library director who caught Clinton's midday rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "I've heard both of them talk, and I haven't disagreed with a thing anyone said." The newspaper is based in Colorado.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_5614723,00.html

Covington Comments On Clinton Campaign (Herald Sun, July 4)

After being whipped by her main rival in the fundraising stakes, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton has brought in her biggest weapon in the race for the presidency: Bill. "I don't think it's a sign of duress or that they feel pressure," said CARY COVINGTON, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, of the timing of Mr. Clinton's entry into the campaign. "They were waiting to bring him in." The newspaper is based in Australia.
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,22012753-5012748,00.html

Clintons Campaign On UI Campus (Los Angeles Times, July 3)
Bill Clinton plunged back into the presidential campaign fray Monday in the role of doting spouse, telling thousands of Democratic supporters here that his wife is better qualified to be president than he was when he first ran for the job. The Clintons are to spend the next two days campaigning together in Iowa, whose January caucuses are the first major test for presidential candidates. They are to visit the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City, parades and July 4th celebrations with a busload of reporters in tow.
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-bill3jul03,1,232315.story?coll=la-politics-campaign

'Billary' Hits Iowa (Forbes.com, July 3)
The force dubbed "Billary" -- the combination of former President Clinton and his wife -- hit Iowa in earnest Tuesday, focusing on lifting her candidacy in an early voting state that one aide has described as her weakest. The Clintons were campaigning across the state for three days, with events ranging from Tuesday's rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to marching in the Clear Lake Independence Day parade Wednesday. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared in the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, WASHINGTON POST, BLOOMINGTON (Ill.) PANTAGRAPH, on the websites of KETV in Nebraska, KNBC in California, WPXI in Pennsylvania, and several other media outlets. The Clinton rally was also noted in an article in the BUFFALO (N.Y.) NEWS.
http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/07/03/ap3881376.html

Bill Clinton 'Opening Act' For Hillary (Washington Post, July 3)
After a career as the center of political attention, Bill Clinton finds himself playing unfamiliar roles on the campaign trail these days -- second fiddle and supportive husband. On a three-day tour of the crucial early voting state of Iowa, the former president served as an opening act for the main attraction -- his wife and the 2008 Democratic presidential front-runner, Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York. "We sort of changed roles now," he said on Tuesday at an outdoor rally in sweltering sun at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I'm kind of out of politics and I'm a little rusty, so you'll have to forgive me." The article originally appeared on REUTERS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/03/AR2007070301529.html

Covington: Clinton Campaign Is Established As Hillary's (Japan Today, July 3)
With her nearest rival gaining momentum in the 2008 U.S. presidential race, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton brought in her biggest weapon yet in her race for the presidency: her husband Bill. The charismatic former president's first campaign swing with his wife opened Monday with a folksy speech at the Iowa State Fairgrounds where he urged the party faithful to vote for Hillary because she is both the best qualified and the most responsible candidate for the Democratic nomination. While Bill Clinton's scandal-laced 1993-2001 presidency continues to draw the ire of Republicans, contributing to Hillary's high "unfavorable" ratings in national polls, he remains widely popular among the Democratic party faithful who decide the primary elections. He is also a formidable fundraiser, a key asset given that Hillary's main Democratic rival to contest the November 2008 election, Barack Obama, announced Sunday he'd topped her by $5 million when he raised an historic $32.5 million in the past three months. "I don't think it's a sign of duress or that they feel pressure," University of Iowa political scientist CARY COVINGTON said of the timing of Bill's entry into the campaign. "They were waiting to bring him in until it was clearly Hillary's campaign and Bill was there to back her up. They believe they've clearly established her as the owner of this campaign and in charge." The same story appeared on the Web sites of BAKU TODAY (Azerbaijan), PHILLIPINES STAR, THE AUSTRALIAN and LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.japantoday.com/jp/news/411251

Squire: McCain Status As Top-Tier Candidate Threatened (Lexington Herald Leader, July 3)
Reeling from another quarter of weak fund-raising, Sen. John McCain slashed his staff yesterday and will refocus his presidential campaign exclusively on early voting states, where aides hope that his retail political skills can overcome his financial straits. "His status as a top-tier candidate is significantly threatened," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "He's unable to finance a national campaign. ... He's going to have to put all his efforts in the first couple of states and hope he can swing them his way." The same story was published on the Web site of the MIAMI HERALD.
http://www.kentucky.com/216/story/114055.html

UI Offers Summer Camp In Microbiology (New York Times, July 3)
Summer camps are not the usual recreation-filled events so many people associate with their own childhoods. Many of them today are designed to recruit students to the quieter academic disciplines, such as robotics, explosives or nanoscience. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for example, has a summer program in microbiology. The same story appeared on the Web site of the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/03/science/03boom.html?ex=1341115200&en=b468e86ca8289dab&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

3,000 Watch Joffrey Perform UI-Sponsored Show In Council Bluffs (Omaha World-Herald, July 2)
Some of the best dancers in the world were in Council Bluffs' Bayliss Park Sunday night, sweating up a storm and putting their best feet forward for a crowd of nearly 3,000 people. The price of admission to see the program featuring the world-famous Joffrey Ballet? Free. This was a gift for the crowd of people mostly from western Iowa and eastern Nebraska. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Hancher Auditorium organized the program, which was part of a $1 million tour to five Iowa cities as a "Gift to Iowa" on the 35th anniversary of Hancher.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2620&u_sid=10069045&u_rss=1

Covington: Obama Must Turn Dollars Into Votes (Agence France Presse, July 2)
Barack Obama's $32.5 million fundraising bombshell was Monday tearing at the aura of invincibility that had gathered around Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton's White House campaign. The 45-year-old Illinois senator sent a surge of electricity through the Democratic race, as he smashed party fundraising records and surpassed Clinton by around five million dollars in the latest three-month accounting period. But when the initial rush of publicity wears off, Obama's cash bonanza will raise expectations in states like Iowa and New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada, which hold early nominating contests next year. "The money has to be translated into poll numbers," said CARY COVINGTON, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "The acid test for him is to translate those dollars into poll support not just nationally but in those four core states. "If those states start showing poll movement that's what will be trouble for Clinton, but right now dollars are just dollars." The same story appeared on the Web site of PENINSULA ONLINE (Qatar).
http://rawstory.com/news/afp/Obama_s_millions_test_Clinton_07022007.html

UI Featured In Grisham Book (WQAD-TV, July 2)
Iowa has a part in John Grisham's next book. The main character in the best selling author's new novel "Playing for Pizza" will play football at a Davenport high school and will attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before landing on a team in Parma, Italy. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=6737135&nav=menu132_3_8_1

Redlawsk Comments On Dodd Campaign (Associated Press, July 2)
Democrat Chris Dodd is touching all the right bases in New Hampshire and Iowa. The problem is he hasn't yet scored big with voters. The Connecticut lawmaker has struggled to gain traction in the two states that begin the 2008 presidential race, barely registering above 1 percent in statewide polls. Dominating the field are fellow Sens. Hillary Rodham Clinton and Barack Obama, whose combined elective experience falls far short of Dodd's 26 years in the Senate. "There's not a lot of breathing space," said DAVID REDLAWSK, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "The media spends most of its time gushing over Obama and Clinton, and -- a little less so -- Edwards. I think candidates like Richardson and Dodd feel this most of all." This Associated Press story was published by the NEW YORK TIMES, the WASHINGTON POST, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, the NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE and NEWSDAY.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Dodd-Early-States.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Electronic Markets Pioneered By UI Now Include Farmers (Omaha World-Herald, July 2)
Since the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988 first persuaded people to buy contracts on political candidates to predict election results, the idea of rewarding the best forecasters for sharing their knowledge has taken off. With its new agriculture game called Farmetrics, Bunge, a global grain marketing company, became the first grain commodity firm to use a prediction market to help make its marketing decisions. The opinion of farmers is so valuable to Bunge it offers prizes to those who regularly forecast how things on the farm will turn out. One farmer, who said he plays every week, accumulates points that he hopes to someday cash in for a vacation in Mexico or for a farm utility vehicle. Winners are those whose forecasts come closest to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's actual data.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=1208&u_sid=10068814&u_rss=1

Story Cites UI's Lie And Stock Back-Dating Scandal (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 1)
Allegations of insider trading always get the attention of lawyers. If they represent shareholders, they'll lick their chops. If they represent insiders, they'll start preparing a defense. But lawyers aren't quite sure what to make of research indicating regulations intended to give executives some protection against insider trading allegations in certain circumstances may be having unintended consequences. The research, done by Stanford University accounting professor Alan Jagolinzer, looked at how executives fared when they sold company stock. Given that another accounting professor, the University of Iowa's ERIK LIE, tipped the SEC off to the stock options back-dating scandal, it's not surprising the agency has taken note of Jagolinzer's work.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07182/798275-28.stm

Redlawsk: Republicans Yet To Settle On Candidates (North County Times, July 1)
University of Iowa political science professor DAVID REDLAWSK said Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., remains "very much under the radar" in the party's presidential race, but persons likely to attend caucuses in January have not yet settled on a candidate. "They're still looking for alternatives and what Hunter really needs to do is build a core base of support," Redlawsk said. "At this point four years ago, (Democrat) John Edwards was drawing 5 percent and he went on to finish second." Hunter's goal, Redlawsk said, should be to do much better than anyone expects and thereby achieve a momentum heading into the February multi-state primaries. The newspaper serves Riverside and San Diego counties in California.
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007/07/02/news/top_stories/7107185049.txt

Story Cites UI Research On Title IX (Danbury News-Times, July 1)
The focus and controversy of the criticism about the Title IX law -- that it took away from boys to give to girls -- has been on sports, but the law resulted in gains for females across the spectrum of academics too. For instance, in 1994, women received 38 percent of medical degrees compared with nine percent in 1972. In 1994, women earned 43 percent of law degrees, compared with seven percent in 1972, and, in 1994, 44 percent of all doctoral degrees to U.S. citizens went to women, up from 25 percent in 1977, according to the research of MARY CURTIS and CHRISTINE GRANT from the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.newstimeslive.com/news/story.php?id=1058168&source=big_barker

Gronbeck Comments On Richardson Campaign (Albuquerque Journal, July 1)
Bill Richardson proclaimed last week that he had jumped up into the top tier of contenders seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. Not all the pundits agree the New Mexico governor has joined the elite group, putting the likes of Joe Biden, Chris Dodd and Dennis Kucinich in his rear-view mirror. BRUCE GRONBECK, who runs the University of Iowa's center on media studies and political culture, said he believes Richardson has yet to successfully package himself as a complete candidate. "He still hasn't got that 'presidential overview.' Richardson needs to do that, to fit his issues together," Gronbeck said. "I think he's got the talent to rise up into that top three," Gronbeck added. "There's room now to start moving in the summer doldrums -- and it's a good time for him to be charging." The newspaper is based in New Mexico.
http://calibre.mworld.com/m/m.w?lp=GetStory&id=259862181

Joffrey's Iowa Tour Celebrates Hancher Auditorium's 35th Anniversary (Omaha World-Herald, July 1)
The prestigious Joffrey Ballet, known for 50 years as a pioneer of American contemporary dance, is not currently at its home base in Chicago. The troupe was in Des Moines on Friday to kick off a $1 million outdoor tour to five Iowa communities. It's being billed as the Hancher Auditorium's "Gift to Iowa" to celebrate the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA auditorium's 35th anniversary. The tour stopped Sunday in Council Bluffs.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_page=2620&u_sid=10068324&u_rss=1&

 

 

 

 

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