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UI in the News

October, 2006

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UI Audited Wireless Network Security (Campus Technology, October 2006)
In an audit of nine academic buildings, technologists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA recently discovered 80 unauthorized (and previously undetected) access points to wireless networks The UI is currently the only public university in that state to conduct a large-scale audit of wireless access points.
http://www.campustechnology.com/article.asp?id=19296

Tolbert Research Tracks Voter Turnout (The Repository, Oct. 31)
Researcher are looking at the effect of anti-gay-marriage ballot initiatives and finding that they to not benefit candidates of one party as much as they increase voter turnout in general. Research co-conducted by political scientist CAROLINE J. TOLBERT of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA concluded "more initiatives appearing on statewide ballots lead to higher voter turnout rates over time." The researchers said initiatives have a stronger effect in midterm than in presidential elections. "Each initiative appearing on the state ballot leads to ... almost a 2 percent increase in turnout in midterm elections, all else equal," they said. The Repository is published in Canton, Ohio.
http://www3.cantonrep.com/index.php?ID=316499&Category=14

IEM Has Poll-Beating Reputation (Rocky Mount Telegram, Oct. 31)
Traders on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS - a futures market with a poll-beating reputation - are betting 47.8 percent on a Democratic takeover of the U.S. House of Representatives in next week's midterm election. This is one appearance of a Cox News Service story.
http://www.rockymounttelegram.com/news/content/shared/news/stories/2006/10/ELECTION_MARKETS_1031_COX.html

Lie Options Backdating Study Noted (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 31)
Backdating may not be yesterday's news after all. Investor reaction has been muted despite a string of criminal indictments and high-profile resignations. After all, stockholders reasoned, the practice was a legacy of the 1990s stock-market bubble, wiped out by the 2002 passage of aggressive corporate reforms that significantly sped up how quickly companies must report stock-options grants. Across the board, compliance is improving with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which since August 2002 has forced companies to report options grants to officers and directors within two days rather than 45 days after the close of the fiscal year. A July study from Professors ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa and Randy Heron of Indiana University showed the percentage of options grants filed late declined from 22 percent of grants in 2002 to 13 percent of grants in 2005. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/10/31/BUG70M2SFM1.DTL

Lie Studied Options Backdating (San Jose Mercury News, Oct. 31)
Silicon Image, which develops chips and creates standards for digital content delivery in consumer electronics, is one of nine companies specified by shareholder advisory firm Glass Lewis in a report Monday on companies that filed late paperwork on grants given to executives. Tougher laws were put in place as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley legislation in 2002 that requires companies to report stock-option grants within two days of issuing them. Glass Lewis said it reviewed hundreds of thousands of insider transactions from January 2004 to June 2006 for its report. Its report echoes research by other academics on the topic, including ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa who wrote one of the first reports on stock-option backdating. The newspaper is based in California. http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/business/15891492.htm

Educator Attended UI (Rapid City Journal, Oct. 31)
In a column from a retired college educator about attending college under the G.I. Bill, the author says he went to Simpson College in Iowa and then transferred to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, from which institution he graduated. Later, he earned a master's degree at Iowa and then enrolled in a doctoral program at the University of Minnesota. The newspaper serves Rapid City, S.D.
http://www.rapidcityjournal.com/articles/2006/10/31/news/columns/173higbee.txt

Husband Writes Tribute To Wife (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 31)
In a column about death of a spouse, the writer says Les Elder can't make peace with his wife Mary Ann's unexpected death 4 1/2 years ago and wrote a tribute to her in the Orange County Register on what would have been the couple's 44th anniversary. For their first date, he invited her to an UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game in the fall of 1961.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-parsons31oct31,1,908378.column?coll=la-util-news-local&ctrack=1&cset=true

Actor Graduated From UI (Naples News, Oct. 31)
Bruce Somerville, who is in the cast of Florida Repertory Theatre's "Moon Over Buffalo," has a master's degree in acting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He has been in about 60 professional plays. The newspaper is based in Florida. http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2006/oct/31/marcos_somerville_follows_his_dream_be_actor/?eagle

Squire Comments Iowa Campaigns (New York Times, Oct. 31)
Republicans have a one-vote advantage in the Iowa House, 51 to 49, and the parties are tied at 25 in the Senate. Noticing these whisker-width margins, prospective presidential candidates, including Gov. George E. Pataki of New York and Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, have donated money to local campaigns, hoping perhaps to make friends before the Iowa Caucuses in 2008. But the money and the high stakes, many people here say, may be having another effect in Des Moines and many other state capitals. State legislative races, with their low-glamour blend of amateur politics and homespun local concerns, may be losing their traditions of civility. "You have more money sloshing around," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa who follows legislative races. More and more, Professor Squire said, control over local campaigns is slipping toward centralized parties or interest groups. "And it is certainly a much rougher campaign than we are used to seeing in Iowa," he said. The story also appeared in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/31/us/politics/31legis.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1

Jones Comments on Flawed Voting Machine (Fortune, Oct. 30)
In June 2001, Diebold announced it was acquiring Global Electronic Systems. Global was a $7-million operation that made most of its money printing ballots for its optical-scan reading machine. Its touch-screen system, the Accu-Vote-TS, wasn't a big seller and was flawed from the start. Global had purchased the technology from a small company called I-Mark, whose founders had designed it as an unattended voting terminal that could be used in places like shopping malls or supermarkets. "The only problem was they weren't looking at security," says DOUGLAS JONES, a computer science professor at University of Iowa who has been testing voting machines since 1994.
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/fortune/fortune_archive/2006/11/13/8393084/index.htm?eref=money_topstories

Poet Levine Studied With Berryman At UI (The New Yorker, Oct. 30)
Pultizer Prize-winning poet Philip Levine says studying with John Berryman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early 1950s was a crucial experience: "When the semester was over he made it clear to me that it was time for me to go out on my own and do whatever I was going to do, without ever needing another teacher."
http://www.newyorker.com/online/content/articles/061030on_onlineonly02

Edwards Speaks At UI Poverty Conference (Winston-Salem Journal, Oct. 30)
Former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards diverted from his campaign schedule to speak at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA conference on poverty. Since the last election, Edwards has opened a center for the study of poverty in North Carolina. He has proposed several steps to combat poverty, ranging from better housing assistance to "stepping-stone jobs" for the poor. "We should be for the eradication of poverty in America," Edwards said. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149191162528&path=!localnews!fedgov!&s=1037645509117

UI Art Alumna Exhibits Paintings In Virginia (Rockbridge Weekly, Oct. 30)
Pat Thomas, who earned a master's degree and a master of fine arts degree in painting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, will exhibit her work at the Law School of Washington and Lee University through January. Thomas has had numerous one-person shows. She also has had work in juried exhibitions - among them shows held by James Madison University, the Roanoke City Art Museum, the Gallery of Contemporary Art in Raleigh, N.C. and the Art Institute of Chicago. The Rockbridge Weekly is published in Lexington, Va.
http://www.rockbridgeweekly.com/rw_article.php?ndx=5430

Gallaudet Reverses Decision On UI Alumna (Inside Higher Ed, Oct. 30)
Jane K. Fernandes, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumna set to become the next president of Gallaudet College, was dismissed by the school's Board of Trustees in an abrupt reversal. The former provost has been the target of protests. In the past month, those protests have escalated to the point that the university for the deaf was at times effectively shut down. The reason for the opposition to Fernandes has been much debated. Student protesters have said that she lacks the leadership traits and personal skills needed to head the world's most prominent university for the deaf. Fernandes, who is deaf, was raised reading lips and did not learn American Sign Language until she was in graduate school at the University of Iowa. A similar story appeared in the CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION.
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2006/10/30/gallaudet

Jones Says E-Voting Puts Democracy At Risk (CNN, Oct. 29)
In a Lou Dobbs broadcast examining the fraud potential of e-voting, computer voting expert DOUGLAS JONES of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA commented, "All of the voting system vendors in the United States are private companies. The problem is the closed-door proprietary nature of the process. The closed system we have right now makes it extremely hard to find out what's going on, and that means that, should a thief get in a position of power, we would never know."
http://edition.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0610/29/ldt.03.html

Buckwalter Comments On Knee Injuries (New York Times Play Magazine, Oct. 29)
One of the reasons that ignoring knee injuries is dangerous is that the injuries harm chrondrocytes. Chondrocytes are the specialized cells that make up cartilage. Each of us, however, has a limited supply. "Unlike most body cells, chondrocytes don't replenish themselves," says DR. JOSEPH BUCKWALTER, an orthopedic surgeon and the chairman of the DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDICS at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Chondrocytes stop replicating about the time your skeleton becomes mature, usually in your mid-teens to early 20's. "At that point, you basically have all the chondrocytes you'll ever have," Buckwalter says. You can damage your chondrocytes through sports even when you don't kill them, according to a theory being posited by Buckwalter. "In normal cells," he says, "after a certain number of divisions, the cells just don't function as well."
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/29/sports/playmagazine/1029play_knee.html?pagewanted=1&ei=5087%0A&em&en=14753dadc103500a&ex=1162270800

UI Alumnus Writes Life Story (The Capital, Oct. 29)
Paul D. Haughton, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has written a paperback, "An Unremarkable Life in Remarkable Times, The Autobiography of a Black Man - of His Joys and Struggles in an Ever-Challenging World."  "This is an effort to share with my family and friends a portion of the God-given blessings I have enjoyed for more than 80 years," Haughton said.
http://www.hometownannapolis.com/cgi-bin/read/2006/10_29-61/CAN

Iowa, Nagel Were Turning Point For Fernandes (Washington Post, Oct. 29)
Jane Fernandes, the embattled president-select at Gallaudet College, the world's leading college for the deaf, embraced her identity as a deaf person as a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After learning American Sign Language, she won the Miss Deaf Iowa title, promising to bridge the gulf between the deaf and hearing worlds. Fernandes was in ALAN F. NAGEL's seminar on John Milton her first semester. Nagel, who became her faculty adviser, said she underwent a metamorphosis, "a real blossoming of someone who was both very intelligent and very strong of character."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/28/AR2006102800934.html

Lie's Stock-Option Research Hits Canada, Too (Toronto Star, Oct. 28)
American securities regulators are looking into Research In Motion Ltd.'s stock-option practices, the Ontario-based company says. The company's stock-option troubles are the result of an unlikely chain of events that began a few years ago. ERIK LIE, a Norwegian-born business professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was hacking away at dry chunks of stock-price data when, as with the first prospector in the Klondike, something caught his eye that would rock the business world. He noticed that executives tended to get options not only when the company's stock was down, but when the stock market as a whole was in a valley. Either corporate directors were psychics who knew when the market was going to go up, or they were backdating options, i.e., picking a favorable date in the past for the options' exercise price, he concluded. Lie's findings attracted the attention of the Securities and Exchange Commission, which began investigating and was soon joined by other government agencies and media organizations. Dozens of probes, lawsuits and resignations ensued.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1161985810169&call_pageid=968350072197&StarSource=RSS

Adams Is Panelist At Nigerian Art Conference (Business Day, Oct. 27)
The department of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, will be hosting the 3rd International Conference on Modern Art in Nigeria in honor of Obiora Udechukwu, a former professor of painting and drawing at Nsukka and an eminent Nigerian artist. SARAH ADAMS, assistant professor in the University of Iowa School of Art and Art History, will speak on a panel at the conference. The publication is based in Lagos, Nigeria.
http://www.businessdayonline.com/?c=55&a=9368

Field Comments on Radon (Lincoln Daily News, Oct. 27)
According to DR. BILL FIELD in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health at University of Iowa, there is direct evidence that prolonged residential radon is one of our leading public health risks and a major cause of cancer. The challenge now is to use this information so that a fire can be lit within people to test and mitigate as well as to promote radon-resistant new construction. Radon is a major environmental carcinogen. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://archives.lincolndailynews.com/2006/Oct/27/Features/health102706_b.shtml

UI Researches Hypnosis For Chronic Pain Relief (WAVE-TV, Oct. 27)
Americans are living in pain: 10 million have back pain, 8 million have fibromyalgia, and 40 million have chronic headaches. In fact, about 50 million Americans suffer from chronic pain. But only about half of these patients benefit from standard treatment. That's why doctors are desperately searching for alternative ways to stop the ache. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are studying whether hypnosis can relieve chronic pain. They believe the technique is effective in between 65 percent and 70 percent of patients. Research suggests hypnosis may work by changing the way the brain receives impulses. WAVE is located in Louisville, Ky. The report originated in Orlando, Fla.
http://www.wave3.com/Global/story.asp?S=5600176

Cochran: Middle-Age Craziness Is Not That Common (Baltimore Sun, Oct. 27)
Middle-age men become more attentive to their health, rather than going middle-age crazy. "We probably all know someone who bought the little red sports car, dumped his wife, and all that," says SAM COCHRAN, a clinical psychologist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and editor of the scientific journal Psychology of Men & Masculinity. "I just don't think there are that many of them."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-hs.men27oct27,0,6413282.story?track=rss

Anderson Comments On Collecting (Psychology Today, Oct. 27)
Tyrants collect money and power, but they also amass bric-a-brac like the rest of us. What, if anything, do their material leanings signify? STEPHEN ANDERSON, professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, has come closest to finding a biological basis for the yen to collect. In 2004 he showed that damage to an area of the prefrontal cortex can lead to hoarding-the pathological cousin of collecting. Anderson doubts that's the case with the dictators. "Most people who have injuries to this part of the brain are not going to be successful," he says, "even in a bad-guy way." Still, he wouldn't be surprised if the bad guys' neural wiring were somehow amiss. http://www.psychologytoday.com/rss/pto-20060920-000004.html

Kinnick Stadium Noted As Loudest (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 27)
While other schools may boast larger stadiums or louder crowds, the Iowa Hawkeyes showed the biggest difference among major football schools between their home record and road record, a gap quantified by Home Turf Differential. (HTD). HTD takes a team's winning percentage at home over the past five seasons and subtracts its winning percentage on the road over the same period. The larger the differential, the stronger the home-field effect. According to the computations, KINNICK STADIUM at the University of Iowa is college football's biggest hurdle for visitors. Between 2001 and 2005, the Hawkeyes had a 29-3 record there (.906), one of the country's top home marks. However, the road record for Kirk Ferentz's squad has been just 13-12 over that time period, resulting in a Home Turf Differential of .386.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116190251291705314.html

Hemley To Speak About Hoax (Hartford Courant,  Oct. 26)
The author of a book that examines whether an anthropological hoax was perpetrated in the Philippines will speak at Trinity College Monday. ROBIN HEMLEY, author of seven fiction and nonfiction books and director of the nonfiction writing program at the University of Iowa, wrote the 2003 book "Invented Eden: The Elusive, Disputed Hoax of the Tasaday." The book tells what happened when a small tribe, the Tasaday, was discovered in the rain forest, living in the manner of Stone Age people. Worldwide interest was sparked, but 12 years later, a Swiss journalist put forth the theory that a hoax had taken place: The Tasaday were farmers persuaded by their "discoverer" to dress in leaves and pretend to be a primitive group isolated from the modern world.The newspaper is based in Connecticut.
http://www.courant.com/features/booksmags/hce-bkcut26g.artoct26,0,1806641.story?coll=hc-headlines-books

Bach Choir Directed By UI Alumnus (Daily Chronicle, Oct. 26)
The Bach Chamber Choir and Orchestra under the direction of Eric A Johnson will perform Oct. 28 in DeKalb, Ill. In October 1982, a group of Bach enthusiasts formed the Bach Chamber Choir under the direction of Wayne Hatwich, a pharmacist and well-known organist who also possessed an M.S. in music from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Illinois.
http://www.dekalb-chronicle.com/articles/2006/10/26/neighbors/neighbors09.txt

IEM Puts Democrats Ahead In House Races (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 26)
Many Washington pundits see a Democratic takeover of the House of Representatives as a done deal. Wall Street is still waking up to it. Polls show voters increasingly favor a changing of the guard in Congress. An election-prediction market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, in which investors bet on what party they see winning the Nov. 7 election, puts the chances of Republican's losing control of the House at 65%, up from 39% a month ago. The Iowa market puts the chances of Republicans losing the Senate at 30%, from 17% a month ago. This matters for markets. A paper by Stanford economists Erick Snowberg and Eric Zitzewitz and Wharton economist Justin Wolfers found a connection between election odds as measured by these prediction markets and stock and bond market-price movements. They found that in the past investors have seen the election of a Republican president as good for stocks but bad for bonds. This time, the Dow Jones Industrial Average has been rising as the odds of victories in Congress by Democrats have increased. Prices of long-term bonds, meantime, have fallen since September after rising in the summer.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116181504897203915-search.html?KEYWORDS=%22university+of+iowa%22&COLLECTION=wsjie/6month

Alumna Receives Whiting Prize For Fiction (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 26)
At the Morgan Library in New York City on Wednesday night, three Bay Area writers -- Yiyun Li, Micheline Aharonian Marcom and Nina Marie Martinez -- were among 10 authors to receive this year's Whiting Writers' Award, which comes with a $40,000 cash prize. Li has a Master's degree in immunology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and she earned her MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2006/10/26/DDGR2LV9SV1.DTL

Alumnus Runs For Nevada Office (Reno Gazette Journal, Oct. 26)
A story about the race for the Washoe County Commission in Nevada notes that one of the candidates, David Humke, earned his Master's degree in social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061025/NEWS10/610250338/1016/NEWS

Former UI Professor Runs For Legislature (Kansas City Star, Oct. 26)
A profile of Walt Chappell, who is running for the Kansas state legislature from Kansas City. Chappell is a former member of the medical school faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/state/15849170.htm

Ben-Shahar Comments On Honeybee Research (The Scientist, Oct. 25)
The genome sequence of the western honeybee may help explain the molecular and genetic basis of this insect's unusual sociality, according to the authors of the published sequence in this week's Nature. The Honeybee Genome Sequencing Consortium has completed the first draft of the sequence, as well as a spate of analyses covering the development, reproduction, gene regulation, neurobiology and behavior, and population genetics of the insect.

Finding these types of genetic differences between honeybees and other insects is "really interesting, because it right away links genome evolution to the ecology of the animal," said YEHUDA BEN-SHAHAR of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, who was not involved in the project.
http://www.the-scientist.com/news/home/25318/

Ryang Comments On Koreans In Japan (Charlotte Observer, Oct. 25)
Japan has 500,000 to 600,000 ethnic Koreans, descendants of those who arrived before or during World War II as forced laborers or economic migrants. Stripped of citizenship and denied basic rights, many of the Korean immigrants took refuge in a Korean group as they tried to survive in a hostile nation. Many ethnic Koreans chose to join the pro-Pyongyang Generation Association of Korean Residents in Japan, or Chosun Soren, even though their ancestral home was in what's now South Korea. After all, until the early 1980s, industrialized North Korea, with help from the Soviet Union, was on an economic par with South Korea. "There was a general belief that North Korea was stable, yes, small and poor, but there was really genuine mass support for North Korea and North Korean organizations," said SONIA RYANG, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa who's an ethnic Korean raised in Japan. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the SAN JOSE MERCUYR NEWS, KANSAS CITY STAR, BRADENTON (FL) HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (CA) TRIBUNE, LEXINGTON (KY) HERALD LEADER, COLUMBUS (GA) LEDGER ENQUIRER, MACON (GA) TELEGRAPH, COLUMBUS (SC) STATE and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/news/world/15846382.htm

Rao Comments On Constipation Drug (Pharmaceutical Business Review, Oct. 25)
Takeda and Sucampo Pharmaceuticals have said that their constipation drug Amitiza showed long-term relief of symptoms of in a recent study. Additionally, Amitiza, the first selective chloride channel activator approved by the FDA for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation, showed improvement in long-term symptom relief of this disorder with significant improvements in constipation severity, abdominal bloating and discomfort for up to 12 months. "These results are encouraging for physicians who treat patients with constipation because there are few treatments approved for chronic constipation that can be used long term," said SATISH RAO, professor of medicine and director, Neurogastroenterology and GI Motility at the University of Iowa. The same story appeared on the Web site of MEDICAL NEWS TODAY.
http://www.pharmaceutical-business-review.com/article_news.asp?guid=4213AAF2-42F7-4BC6-9945-384F36966118

Former UI Professor Not Teaching Porn (Terre Haute News Star, Oct. 25)
An Indiana State Uiversity professor who gained national attention after leading class studies about pornography says students shouldn't expect him to be teaching the topic here anytime soon. While at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Jay Clarkson - a newly hired assistant professor in the ISU Communications Department - had the national media spotlight on him after teaching a class on pornography. David Letterman, MTV and Time magazine produced news segments or stories discussing Clarkson's class, and more conservative media outlets criticized him and the school for allowing the subject to be discussed in class. "I was simply studying what pornography is used for and how it affects people and the reactions to it," Clarkson said. "We never once watched pornography in that class."
http://www.tribstar.com/schools/local_story_298000431.html

Alumna Talks About Being A Witch (City Pages, Oct. 25)
A story about modern day witches includes an interview with Anna Mahan-Miller, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. City Pages is based in Minneapolis-St. Paul.
http://citypages.com/databank/27/1351/article14819.asp

Nelson: Markets More Accurate Than Polls (NewsMax, Oct. 24)
Republicans will hold their majority in the Senate but lose it in the House, according to the current odds given by Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM), a wagering Web site that has proven to be more accurate than opinion polls in predicting election results. Started in 1988, IEM is the longest-running political prediction market in existence. Many experts believe prediction markets are more accurate than opinion polls because voters don't have the incentive to tell pollsters the truth. When their money is on the line, they do. "If I wanted a single best guess of the outcome of an upcoming election, I'd certainly look at a well-organized prediction market before I'd look at the polls," said FORREST NELSON, a director of IEM and one of its three founders. One study by Nelson and two others documented that prediction markets are "considerably more accurate long-range forecasting tools than polls across elections and across long periods of time preceding elections."
http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2006/10/23/182003.shtml

Jones Discusses Voting Machine Security (Talk of the Nation, Oct. 24)
DOUGLAS JONES
, associate professor of computer science, took part in a roundtable discussion about electronic voting machines and security on the NPR program "Talk of the Nation." This link connects to an audio file to be downloaded.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6375956

CEO Explains Choice of UI Degree (Business Ledger, Oct. 24)
A survey by executive recruiter Spencer Stuart reports that that only 10 percent of CEOs of the top 500 companies in the world received degrees from Ivy League colleges and that more received their degrees from the University of Wisconsin than from Harvard University, the most represented Ivy on the list. Mary Lynn Fayoumi, president and CEO of the Management Association of Illinois, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, because, as she says, "being from Iowa, there are two choices, Iowa or Iowa State." She went to Iowa, intending to be a psychology major, but within her first year she discovered that her goals may be much better reached in another field. While she knew that she wanted a leadership role and to work in a large city, Fayoumi discovered that HR-human resources-had many of the same core principles as psychology but that a degree in that would also allow her to enter the business world. The newspaper is based in suburban Chicago.
http://www.thebusinessledger.com/Articles.asp?artId=1347&isuID=79

IEM Teaches Market Mechanics (Motley Fool, Oct. 24)
Most online brokers offer tutorials to help beginning investors avoid making costly errors in entering orders. However, a graduate school has given investors a fun alternative that can teach you about how markets operate and also offer you a chance to invest in the prospects of your favorite political candidate or party. The University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business developed the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) in 1988 as a tool for teaching students about market mechanics and as a way to gather research for studies about investor behavior. Anyone is allowed to open a trading account and to trade on certain markets, including the IEM's political markets, with deposits limited to a maximum of $500. The article also appeared on the website of MSNBC.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/fool/20061024/bs_fool_fool/116169672204

Dobyns Attended UI Writers' Workshop (Inquirer & Mirror, Oct. 23)
A profile on poet Stephen Dobyns notes, "After attending the prominent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate writing program in the late 1960s, Dobyns worked for two years at the Detroit News, leaving in 1971. After that, Dobyns spent six or seven months wandering around Europe. He was in Europe when he got word that a publisher would be putting out his first book of poems, 'Concurring Beasts.' From that point on, Dobyns wrote novels and taught a year each in several places - including the University of Iowa - to support his poetry work." The Inquirer & Mirror is published in Nantucket, Mass.
http://ack.net/Poetryslam101906.html

Stone Comments On Lucentis Therapy (China Daily, Oct. 23)
Lucentis can help prevent vision loss from "wet" age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of blindness in older adults. DR. EDWIN M. STONE from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA comments that before Lucentis became available, many doctors were using bevacizumab, an antibody therapy originally approved for advanced colon cancer. Early reports suggested that this agent, which is much less expensive than Lucentis, is safe and effective for wet AMD. "A head-to-head study of Lucentis and bevacizumab and a careful evaluation of an 'induction and follow-up' strategy with either drug are probably the next most useful steps in this field," Stone concludes.
http://www.chinapost.com.tw/supplement/detail.asp?onNews=&GRP=K&id=92180

Concertmaster Attended The UI (The Ledger, Oct. 23)
Art Pranno, concertmaster of the Imperial Symphony, will switch places with the conductor for an upcoming concert. Pranno earned a degree in violin performance from THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Ledger is published in Lakeland, Fla.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061023/NEWS/610230309/1326

Foundation Helped Musician (Uinta County Herald, Oct. 23)
The Wyoming Community Foundation, a non-profit organization that strives "to serve as the permanent statewide philanthropic vehicle" in Wyoming. Among the  programs  the Foundation helps is Young Musicians program Chairman Carolee Bowen spoke of how the Foundation assisted the program currently offered in Evanston, whose budget has grown from $50 in 1995 to more than $50,000 currently. Bowen's daughter recently completed graduate music work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, an accomplishment that would not have occurred without the Young Musicians program, according to Bowen. The newspaper is based in Wyoming.
http://www.uintacountyherald.com/main.php?story_id=3683&page=23

UI Noted in Among Big Ten Universities (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 22)
This article gives snapshots of  the academic strengths of each university in the Big Ten, along with other facts about each institution. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was one of the first universities to grant degrees in creative work, and aspiring writers from around the world jockey for a spot in the acclaimed Writers' Workshop. The undergraduate English Department is also highly regarded, as are the behavioral sciences, business and premed (the university has one of the largest teaching hospitals in the U.S.). A companion article also notes the UI's new art building was designed by Stephen Holl.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0610220435oct22,1,4989881.story?page=3 and ttp://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0610220436oct22,1,5383098.story

Lie Surprised By Comverse Legal Jeopardy (Newsday, Oct. 22)
Stock option backdating has resulted in criminal charges against Comverse executives, including CEO Kobi Alexander. ERIC LIE, a professor of finance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says he's surprised that the Alexander case escalated into a federal manhunt. Earlier this year, Lie's study of stock trends raised red flags about the awarding of stock options and led to publicity in the Wall Street Journal that prompted the federal probe. Lie said that improper backdating of stock options was "widespread" among hundreds of publicly traded companies. Nevertheless, Lie said, "I thought there would have been tax consequences, not necessarily criminal consequences."
http://www.newsday.com/business/ny-bzcomv1023,0,4043450.story?page=1&track=rss

26 Fired In Scandal Uncovered By Lie (Crain's New York Business, Oct. 22)
Nationwide, an estimated 14 percent of all option grants between 1996 and 2005 were backdated, according to University of Iowa finance professor ERIK LIE. So far, at least 26 senior executives have been fired, suspended or forced to resign from the nearly 150 companies that have reported internal or government investigations, according to human resources consulting firm Challenger Gray & Christmas. Article is available only to subscribers of Crain's. Crain's Main Website: http://www.newyorkbusiness.com/index.cms?seen=Y

Prankster McLeod Confronted Meat Loaf (contactmusic.com, Oct. 22)
KEMBREW MCLEOD
, associate professor of communications at the University of Iowa, is a well-known prankster. A recent target was the veteran rocker Meat Loaf, during a media conference call promoting his new album, "Bat Out Of Hell III." McLeod quizzed the star over the meaning of one of his songs, and then launched into a tongue-in-cheek protest. McLeod, who in 1998 sold his soul on eBay and filed a trademark on the phrase "freedom of expression," says, "I really did it for my own private amusement... He can personally call me and I'll apologize, and then we can have a further conversation about it." Contactmusic.com is a UK music and music news Website.
http://www.contactmusic.com/news.nsf/article/meat%20loaf%20lyrics%20are%20like%20faeces_1011532

Jones Comments On New Voting Technology (Baltimore Sun, Oct. 22)
Voters are uncomfortable with new electronic voting technology, but that discomfort is nothing new: They didn't like the level-pull machines when they were introduced, either. "It's exactly the same response today that was heard 100 years ago," says DOUGLAS W. JONES, a computer scientist who specializes in election technology at the University of Iowa. "Those machines were new technology that was on the cutting edge, state of the art. They were more complicated than the early automobiles, than the highest-tech steam engines of the era. They had zillions of moving parts." And the possibility of fraud was already seen as a concern by some, and an opportunity for others. Jones reports that Louisiana Gov. Earl Long, forced to put in machines for the 1960 election, said, "I ain't afraid of them. Give me the right election commission and I can make these voting machines sing 'Home, Sweet Home.'"
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/opinion/ideas/bal-id.vote22oct22,0,6810213.story?coll=bal-ideas-headlines

Paper Publishes Fiction By Workshop Alumna (LA Times Magazine, Oct. 22)
The Los Angeles Times Magazine published the short story "Salt Lick" by Edan Lepucki, identifying her as "an L.A. native and graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP."
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/magazine/la-tm-saltlick43oct22,1,7301333.story?coll=la-headlines-magazine

UI Hydraulic Engineering Alumnus Runs For Congress (Pioneer Press, Oct. 21)
Obi Sium, 65, a native of Ethiopia with a degree in hydraulic engineering from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the Republican candidate for Minnesota's 4th Congressional District. In Ethiopia, Sium was a chief engineer of the city of Asmara's water supply, and he was a hydrologist and engineer with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for nearly 30 years. When a young man on the campaign trail asked Sium his profession, "I'm retired now, but I worked for the state," replied Sium, mingling with a crowd at St. Paul's University Club. "Sorry to hear that," the man said. "Why? I'm proud to be a public servant," Sium said. The Pioneer Press is published in St. Paul, Minn.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/politics/15812541.htm

Columnist Recommends Lie Study On Stock Options (networkworld.com, Oct. 21)
In a piece titled "The Year of Sleaze?" columnist Mark Gibbs recommends, "If you don't understand why stock option backdating is illegal and sleazy you should read 'Backdating of Executive Stock Option (ESO) Grants' by ERIK LIE of the University of Iowa."
http://www.networkworld.com/columnists/2006/102306backspin.html

UI Press Collection Reviewed (Providence Journal, Oct. 21)
The paper says of author Jim Tomlinson's collection of short stories, "Things Kept, Things Left Behind," "Jim Tomlinson quietly creates a distinct world in this wonderful collection of short stories that won the 2006 Iowa Short Fiction Award." The book was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The Providence Journal is published in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/books/content/BOOK-THINGS-LEFT_10-22-06_AD2BDE1.27a0fb8.html

Chang Represented In Lopez Book 'Home Ground' (Express-News, Oct. 20)
A review of the Barry Lopez book "Home Ground" -- featuring definitions reflecting our connection with landscape -- notes that the contributors include "the director of the renowned creative writing program at the University of Iowa (LAN SAMANTHA CHANG)..." The Express-News is published in San Antonio, Texas.
http://www.mysanantonio.com/entertainment/books/stories/MYSA102206.9P.book.home.e8a102.html

VanBeek Separates Fact From Fiction In Nail Care (Washington Times, Oct. 20)
MARTA J. VANBEEK
, assistant professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says that when it comes to caring for your nails, many of the tips that you've taken for granted over the years may in fact be myths that can damage them. ""Healthy, strong nails are important not just for their looks but for performing the tasks of daily life, like picking up objects," VanBeek said. "Most of us don't realize the importance of our nails until we have a problem with them. Misconceptions about nail care abound and it's important to know the facts so that you can keep your nails in top shape." This story was also distributed by United Press International. A version of this article appeared on HEALTHNEWSDIGEST.COM.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi/20061020-022404-8415r.htm

Galvin Says Book Speaks For Itself (Reporter-Herald, Oct. 20)
"Loveland Loves to Read" chose JAMES GALVIN's "The Meadow" as its 2006 book. Galvin, who teaches in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, says the book was not an immediate success. "It wasn't very well received when it first came out because ..." - he paused for a split second - "it's weird," he concluded. "I wanted to write a book where the main character was the land, and the people were just weather blowing through." The Reporter-Herald is published in Loveland, Colo.
http://www.reporterherald.com/Region-Story.asp?ID=7344

Pamuk Was In IWP (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 20)
Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk, winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature, "was briefly at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," where he was in residence in the International Writing Program.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i09/09a02702.htm

Gilchrist Discusses UI Departure (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 20)
The paper notes the departure from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA of a laboratory director who objected to cutting the size of a proposed new laboratory building. Mary Gilchrist, 62, director of the UI's Hygienic Laboratory, which investigates pathogens, says she was fired because she went out on her own and tried to raise money for the project herself, after the university made the cuts.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i09/09a00702.htm

Clothing Store Owner Attended UI (Stores Magazine, October 2006)
David Levin first displayed an interest in and aptitude for retailing during college. At 19, he and a fellow student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- where Levin studied history and sociology -- started a military surplus clothing store called Bivouac. What began as a way to earn college tuition continues some 36 years later. In 2000 he joined Designs Inc. and by 2002 he was encouraging the company to buy the Casual Male Big & Tall chain out of bankruptcy. Four years and many focus groups later, the company exited the Levi's and Dockers business in order to concentrate exclusively on the big-and-tall segment. Today the retailer, which trades as Casual Male Retail Group (CMRG), is the largest player in that segment.
http://www.stores.org/archives/2006/10/edit2.asp

Skorton Hosted Jazz Show at UI (Ithaca Journal, Oct. 20)
At a concert Oct. 21, Cornell University President David Skorton will perform as saxophone soloist with the Wind Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble I. He played saxophone and flute in Iowa City and hosted a weekly jazz program, "As Night Falls," on KSUI, the University of Iowa's public FM radio station. The newspaper is based in New York. http://www.theithacajournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061019/ENTERTAINMENT04/610190312

Emerging Poets To Read (Arizona Daily Star, Oct. 20)
Three emerging poets will read from their works at 8 p.m. Thursday. "The Next Word in Poetry" is the theme of the word-rich evening with readings by Srikanth Reddy, Brian Turner and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. Reddy, has  a Ph.D. from Harvard University and is a graduate of the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Wilkinson has two books of poems out, "Suspension of a Secret in Abandoned Rooms" (Pinball Publishing, 2005) and "Lug Your Careless Body Out of the Careful Dusk" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2006). "Lug Your Careless Body" brought home the 2005 Iowa Poetry Prize.
http://www.azstarnet.com/sn/accent/151875.php

Squire Comments On Congressional Elections (Globe and Mail, Oct. 20)
In the U.S. heartland, the war is casting a pall over Republican efforts to hold on to their majorities in the House of Representatives and the Senate, according to Gerald Wright, a political scientist at University of Indiana. The situation is so bad that growing numbers of Republicans are actually calling for a radical change in strategy. Jim Leach, a Republican in trouble as he seeks his 16th two-year term in the state's 2nd District, has called for the withdrawal of U.S. troops within a year. But PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, thinks it may be too late for Mr. Leach and other Republicans in risky districts. "At this point, I don't think there is much Republicans can do to salvage this election," Mr. Squire said. The newspaper is located in Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20061020.IRAQELECT20/TPStory/TPInternational/?page=rss&id=GAM.20061020.IRAQELECT20

Pamuk Studied In UI Writing Program (Al-Ahram Weekly, Oct. 20)
Orhan Pamuk, the first Turkish Nobel laureate in literature, has rarely left his hometown of Istanbul for long, except for a stint at the International Writing Program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA between 1985 and 1988. The newspaper is located in Egypt.
http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2006/817/cu5.htm

UI Professors Studied Flawed Judgments (United Press International, Oct. 19)
Research shows both experts and novices can make notoriously poor consumer judgments and U.S. scientists say they believe they've determined why that is. The University of Iowa scientists studied the mental processes behind such flawed assessments -- a recurring issue in many areas of consumer research -- as well as in other areas of psychology and psychiatry. Where the relationship between price and quality is concerned, ARUL MISHRA and DHANAJAY NAYAKANKUPPAM argue a lack of consistency leads to poor judgments just as often other errors, such as using the wrong model, wrong cues or wrong weights.
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/view.php?StoryID=20061018-060544-7675r

Williams, Griffith Lead Prostate Cancer Study (MedIndia, Oct. 19)
A team of University of Iowa Health Care researchers has launched an important clinical trial of a novel therapeutic that may eventually lead to new treatments for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The Ad5-TRAIL gene therapy for prostate cancer research trial is a Phase I study designed to test the optimal dosage at which the therapeutic agent can safely be given to patients. _The clinical study is being co-led by THOMAS GRIFFITH, Ph.D., an associate professor in the UI Department of Urology, and RICHARD WILLIAMS, M.D., the Rubin H. Flocks Chair in Urology and professor and head of the UI Department of Urology. "This is the first use of this type of anti-cancer agent which was developed at the University of Iowa. This new gene therapy may help us successfully manage patients with high-risk prostate cancer," Griffith said. "Ideally, we hope to be able to say at the conclusion of this trial that this novel agent is safe and performs as intended by causing the death of prostate tumor cells with no harm to normal cells. However, being at the initial stages of the trial, it is premature to make any claims until the data is analyzed."
http://www.medindia.net/news/view_news_main.asp?x=15196

Schneider Book: U.S. Healthcare Not Underperforming (Oct. 19)
The U.S. healthcare system is not as underperforming compared to other developed nations as some evidence suggests, the authors of a new book say. There is the phenomenon that we spend more than other countries without necessarily having better outcomes, said JOHN SCHNEIDER, health policy professor at the University of Iowa and author of a new book called The Business of Health: The Role of Competition, Markets and Regulation. But maybe we just want to spend twice as much, Schneider told United Press International at a launch event for the book this week at the American Enterprise Institute. We can spend more -- we have higher per capita GDP. What people pay in other countries is not necessarily relevant.
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/697376/analysis_book_defends_us_health_system/index.html

Man Treated For Autism At UIHC (Hancock County Journal-Pilot, Oct. 19)
A story about a man living with autism points out that as a child, he was treated at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. The Journal-Pilot is based in Carthage, IL.
http://www.journalpilot.com/articles/2006/10/18/news/news1.txt

Alumnus Gives Gift To North Dakota College (Enderlin Independent, Oct. 19)
Jamestown College of North Dakota alumni Drs. Peggy (Meister) '58 and Merle '58 Foss donated $500,000 to improve the curriculum and equipment needs to keep up with the changing times of fitness. Merle Foss received his Ph.D. in physiology/biophysics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Independent is published in North Dakota.
http://www.enderlinindependent.com/4DLink2/4dcgi/Get_News_Story/PB100069/PB100069-711/1

Bly Attended UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 19)
Robert Bly, internationally known poet, translator, social critic and moral force, has sold his archives to the University of Minnesota Libraries for $775,000. It is the university's largest such acquisition. Bly, 79, of Minneapolis, was raised on a farm near Madison, Minn., and attended St. Olaf College, Harvard University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.startribune.com/384/story/754710.html

Hass Noted As Environmental Activist (The Flint Journal, Oct. 19)
ROBERT HASS
is a man of letters and an environmental activist. As the United States Poet Laureate from 1995-97, he used his position to bring attention to literature and the natural world. "I found myself thinking about ways in which American literature and art connect us to places where we live," Hass said in a telephone interview from the University of Iowa. He's teaching at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Hass will read his poetry, speak and sign books beginning at 7 p.m. Friday in the Kiva at the University Center of the University of Michigan-Flint. The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/fljournal/index.ssf?/base/features-2/1161265877319500.xml&coll=5

Birth Defect Research Done at UI (MedIndia.com, Oct. 19)
Following up on an earlier discovery that a gene called IRF6 is involved in the common birth defect cleft lip and palate, researchers at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and their colleagues have identified the function of the gene. Their latest findings, published online Oct. 15 in Nature Genetics, reveal an unexpected role for IRF6 in the growth and development of skin cells, a discovery that may have implications for wound healing and cancer research. In 2002, BRIAN SCHUTTE, Ph.D., UI associate professor of pediatrics and nursing, and JEFF MURRAY, M.D., UI professor of pediatrics, pediatric dentistry and biological sciences, and the Roy J. Carver Chair in Perinatal Health, led a study showing that mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), a rare, dominantly inherited form of cleft lip and palate. Subsequently, the researchers found that this gene also is mutated in 10 to 15 percent of the more common, so-called non-syndromic cases of cleft lip and palate. http://www.medindia.net/news/view_news_main.asp?x=15193

UI Attractions, Traditions Described (Sports Illustrated on Campus, Oct. 18)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
football traditions and campus landmarks are noted in this article, along with the author's picks for best bar, best pizza, best restaurant, and best place to grab breakfast in Iowa City. The author says the neatest building on campus is the new art building and adds that the best place for student activities is Hubbard Park, site of ESPN's "College GameDay" on Sept. 30. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/sioncampus/10/17/roadtrip.iowa/index.html

Backdating Scandal Growing (Financial Times, Oct. 18)
The scandal of the backdating of executive and employee share options by US companies grows inexorably. More than 30 chief executives and other board directors have lost their jobs, the latest being Kenneth Levy, chairman of KLA-Tencor, and William McGuire, chief executive of United Health. In spite of the fact that so many companies are being investigated, others will escape. ERIK LIE, a professor at the University of Iowa, estimates that 14 per cent of all grants to top US executives between 1996 and 2005 were backdated or manipulated. The practice appears to have been particularly widespread in Silicon Valley, where stock options were awarded to many employees.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=090248c3e59b2b4f3cba81bc0ed3e055&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVzz-zSkVb&_md5=53fbbe49e91e856560aaaa3a667e0d07

Schnulz-Stubner Studies Hypnosis For Pain Relief (WJRT-TV, Oct. 18)
Fifty million Americans suffer from chronic pain, but about half don't benefit from standard treatment. That's why doctors are searching for other ways to stop the ache. Yoga is one proven method. In a UCLA study, patients with chronic pain reduced their meds and felt better after four weeks. University of Iowa researchers are using hypnosis to ease pain. Research shows the technique may actually change the way the brain processes pain. "Hypnosis is effective probably in the range 65 to 70 percent," said Dr. SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER, an anesthesiologist with the university. WJRT is based in Flint, MI.
http://abclocal.go.com/wjrt/story?section=healthfirst&id=4672577

Lie: 14 Percent Of Stock Options Backdated (Financial Times, Oct. 18)
The backdating affair has become the biggest corporate governance scandal in the United States since the collapse of Enron. Disturbingly, the practices still under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Department of Justice appear to have been extremely widespread. This was not a case of a few bad apples at corporations such as Enron and WorldCom. In spite of the fact that so many companies are being investigated, others will escape. ERIK LIE, a professor at the University of Iowa, estimates that 14 percent of all grants to top U.S. executives between 1996 and 2005 were backdated or manipulated. The practice appears to have been particularly widespread in Silicon Valley, where stock options were awarded to many employees.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/eb956372-5e45-11db-82d4-0000779e2340,_i_rssPage=063fb9c2-3000-11da-ba9f-00000e2511c8.html

Schneider Book: U.S. Healthcare Performing Well (UPI, Oct. 18)
The U.S. healthcare system is not as underperforming compared to other developed nations as some evidence suggests, the authors of a new book say. "There is the phenomenon that we spend more than other countries without necessarily having better outcomes," said JOHN SCHNEIDER, health policy professor at the University of Iowa and author of a new book called The Business of Health: The Role of Competition, Markets and Regulation. "But maybe we just want to spend twice as much," Schneider told United Press International at a launch event for the book this week at the American Enterprise Institute. "We can spend more -- we have higher per capita GDP. What people pay in other countries is not necessarily relevant."
http://www.upi.com/HealthBusiness/view.php?StoryID=20061017-115009-4140r

DeFurio Leaves For Colorado Hospital (Rocky Mountain News, Oct. 18)
ANTHONY DEFURIO
will become chief financial officer of the University of Colorado Hospital on Dec. 2. DeFurio is currently chief financial officer at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, a 760-bed academic medical center and one of the nation's largest university-owned teaching hospitals.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/other_business/article/0,2777,DRMN_23916_5073906,00.html

Ferguson Comments On Weight Loss Triggers (Richmond Times Dispatch, Oct. 18)
A special or life-changing event is a great motivator to lose weight in the short run. However, once the goal is achieved, it can be difficult to maintain motivation, said KRISTI J. FERGUSON, an associate professor at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. To make it last: Use the special event as a kicking-off point, but plan in advance what you're going to use as a motivator beyond the special event to maintain your weight loss.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1149191212097&path=%21flair&s=1045855936229

Zulu Poet, Former Iowa Teacher Dies (The Guardian, Oct. 18)
Mazisi Kunene, Zulu poet, long-time anti-apartheid activist and later poet laureate of South Africa, has died. His obituary notes that he taught in the United States during the 1970s, including at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Guardian is published in the UK.
http://books.guardian.co.uk/obituaries/story/0,,1924003,00.html

Kidder Attended Writers' Workshop (Milford Daily News, Oct 17)
Pulitzer Prize winning author Tracy Kidder will appear at Dean College on Oct. 19. Kidder authored the assigned book "Mountains Beyond Mountains." Kidder attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he participated in the Writers' Workshop, and eventually earned his master of fine arts degree. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://milforddailynews.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=101207

Small Town Stories Described (Guardian Weekend, Sept. 16)
STEPHEN BLOOM
, UI journalism professor, wrote this article about the "Oxford Project," a collaboration with PETER FELDSTEIN, University of Iowa emeritus professor of art. It began in 1984, when Feldstein photographed 670 people in the small eastern Iowa town of Oxford. Last year, Feldstein decided to go back to Oxford and follow up the original project with a new series of portraits of the same people. This time, Bloom conducted interviews with the subjects and saw how their lives had changed.

Missen Brings Internet To Africa (Satisfaction Magazine, Oct. 16)
For a specialist in international development and computer technology, CLIFF MISSEN has an unusual resume: High school dropout. Homesteader in Alaska. Prison guard. Well driller. But his most formative experience came even earlier, when as a child he was shuttled between various relatives and foster homes. "I knew what it was like to feel powerless," Missen says. "But I also had the experience of being served by those who took me in when I didn't have a home. When I was 17, I made a pledge that I was going to try to live a life of service, too." Over the course of three decades, Missen has fulfilled that pledge in a variety of ways. Much of his efforts have focused on Africa. At 20 he spent three months helping set up a rural health clinic in Liberia. Then he went to college in the States and afterwards returned to Liberia as the founder of Wellspring Africa, a non-profit organization that brought low-cost water well drilling technology to remote areas. A Fulbright Scholarship in 1998-99 gave him the opportunity to teach computer technology at the University of Jos in Nigeria. Today he is the director of the Widernet Project, a non-profit organization based at the University of Iowa that works to improve digital communications in developing nations.
http://www.satisfactionmag.com/index.php/2006/10/building-digital-bridges-to-africa/

Lie Uncovered Stock Options Backdaters (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 16)
A story about William McGuire's ouster as head of UnitedHealth over illegally backdated stock options points out that it wasn't regulators or whistle-blowers who outed this practice. It was a little-known University of Iowa business school professor, ERIK LIE, who determined that dozens of U.S. companies seemed to have near-perfect timing on option awards. His 2005 paper, "On the Timing of CEO Stock Option Awards," soon came to the attention of Wall Street Journal reporters.
http://www.startribune.com/1069/story/747160.html

Cleft Palate, Lip Causes Identified (KSL-TV, Oct. 16)
British-led research into cleft lip and palate might lead to babies with certain craniofacial disorders being successfully treated in the womb. University of Manchester researchers say they have uncovered the causes behind two genetic conditions that lead to facial anomalies including clefts, where the lip and often the roof of the mouth, or palate, fail to form properly. Working with colleagues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Manchester husband and wife team Mike and Jill Dixon and researcher Rebecca Richardson identified the role of a gene called IRF6.The team established that mice missing the gene developed abnormal skin as well as cleft palate. The article originally appeared on the UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL wire service and DAILY INDIA. The TV station is located in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.ksl.com/?nid=199&sid=570219

Gene Therapy To Treat Prostate Cancer (Monsters and Critics, Oct. 16)
A team of U.S. researchers is starting a clinical trial of a novel therapy that might lead to new treatments for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The University of Iowa scientists say the Ad5-TRAIL gene therapy for prostate cancer research trial is a Phase I study designed to test the optimal dosage at which the therapeutic agent can safely be given to patients. The clinical study is being co-led by THOMAS GRIFFITH, an associate professor in the department of urology, and DR. RICHARD WILLIAMS, a urology professor and head of the university's department of urology. "This is the first use of this type of anti-cancer agent which was developed at the University of Iowa," said Griffith. "This new gene therapy may help us successfully manage patients with high-risk prostate cancer."
http://news.monstersandcritics.com/health/article_1211655.php/New_prostate_cancer_therapy_is_studied

Options Rules Discussed (CNN Money, Oct. 16.)
In a commentary, it's noted that all stock options granted to employees have to be expensed starting this year. But the backdating offenses coming to light now (thanks to the work of University of Iowa business school professor ERIK LIE) almost all predate 2002. They were committed back in a day when virtually every significant business organization in the country was arguing that options shouldn't be expensed, a view endorsed by the Big Six accounting firms.
http://money.cnn.com/blogs/curiouscapitalist/index.html#116102145487030569

Cochran Comments on Mid-Life Crisis (Sun-Sentinel, Oct. 16)
The "midlife crisis" so often portrayed in the media is actually quite rare, researchers say. Instead, most men in their 40s adjust to a changing situation with sensitivity and good judgment. This doesn't mean that every man at midlife is Mr. Maturity. "We probably all know someone who bought the little red sports car, dumped his wife, and all that," says SAM COCHRAN, a clinical psychologist at the University of Iowa and editor of the scientific journal Psychology of Men & Masculinity. "I just don't think there are that many of them." He does admit that when he goes to the gym "I see guys who are middle-aged and driving themselves too hard. They get kind of obsessive with the machines. . . . It's like they're trying to stop all the aging." The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/health/la-he- newmen16oct16,0,2940170.story?track=rss

Gaming President: Gambling Paid For UI Center (Columbus Dispatch, Oct. 16)
A story about the gambling industry in Iowa points out that revenues from gambling have paid for, among other things, a research center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Dispatch is based in Ohio.
http://www.columbusdispatch.com/?story=dispatch/2006/10/16/20061016-A1-03.html

Lie Uncovered Backdating Scandal (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 16)
A timeline of key dates in the career of William McGuire, who resigned as CEO, chairman and director of UnitedHealth over backdated stock options. The timeline notes the backdating scandal was uncovered in research by ERIK LIE, finance professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.startribune.com/535/story/744472.html

Column Notes Gilchrist Dismissal (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 16)
A column notes the dismissal of Mary Gilchrist, director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Hygienic Laboratory.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v53/i09/09a00702.htm

Griffith, Williams Lead Prostate Cancer Team (New Kerala, Oct. 16)
A team of University of Iowa Health Care researchers has launched an important clinical trial of a novel therapeutic that may eventually lead to new treatments for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. The Ad5-TRAIL gene therapy for prostate cancer research trial is a Phase I study designed to test the optimal dosage at which the therapeutic agent can safely be given to patients.  The clinical study is being co-led by THOMAS GRIFFITH, Ph.D an associate professor in the Department of Urology, and RICHARD WILLIAMS, M.D., the Rubin H. Flocks Chair in Urology and professor and head of the UI Department of Urology. "This is the first use of this type of anti-cancer agent which was developed at the University of Iowa. This new gene therapy may help us successfully manage patients with high-risk prostate cancer," Griffith said. "Ideally, we hope to be able to say at the conclusion of this trial that this novel agent is safe and performs as intended by causing the death of prostate tumor cells with no harm to normal cells. However, being at the initial stages of the trial, it is premature to make any claims until the data is analyzed." New Kerala is based in India.
http://www.keralanext.com/news/?id=878047

UI Aids In Cleft Palate Research (Innovations Report, Oct. 16)
Pioneering new research into cleft lip and palate could open the door to babies with certain craniofacial disorders being successfully treated in the womb. University of Manchester researchers have uncovered the causes behind two genetic conditions that lead to facial anomalies including clefts, where the lip and often the roof of the mouth, or palate, fail to form properly. Working with colleagues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Manchester husband and wife team Mike and Jill Dixon together with researcher Rebecca Richardson, have identified the role of a gene called IRF6.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/biowissenschaften_chemie/bericht-72105.html

Cochran Comments On Midlife Crisis (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 15)
The "midlife crisis" so often portrayed in the media - a period of emotional tumult and strain, when men get divorced, buy a red Corvette, sleep with women half their age and get hair and pectoral implants - is actually quite rare, researchers say. Instead, most men in their 40s adjust to a changing situation with sensitivity and good judgment. But this doesn't mean that every man at midlife is Mr. Maturity. "We probably all know someone who bought the little red sports car, dumped his wife, and all that," says SAM COCHRAN, a clinical psychologist at the University of Iowa and editor of the scientific journal Psychology of Men & Masculinity. "I just don't think there are that many of them." He does admit that when he goes to the gym "I see guys who are middle-aged and driving themselves too hard. They get kind of obsessive with the machines.... It's like they're trying to stop all the aging."
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-he-newmen16oct16,1,7468999.story?coll=la-headlines-health

Squire Comments On Clinton Candidacy (Washington Post, Oct. 15)
A story about the presidential prospects of Sen. Hillary Clinton, who, if she does seek the White House in 2008 and actively campaigns in Iowa, will be departing from her husband's path who as Arkansas governor made just one appearance in the state before the 1992 Iowa Democratic Caucuses. "The interesting question is exactly how Senator Clinton is going to approach Iowa," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a University of Iowa political science professor. "Other candidates have put a lot more time and energy into the state and there's some evidence from polls ... that people have some reservations about whether Senator Clinton's electable. I think she has to begin to think seriously about how she can reassure people that if she does run, she can win." The same story appeared in the CHINA POST (Shanghai), CAPITOL HILL BLUE, MONSTERS AND CRITICS, THANH NIEN DAILY (VIETNAM) and MSN NEWS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/14/AR2006101401428.html

Edwards Speaks At Law School (San Jose Mercury News, Oct. 14)
A story about former Sen. John Edwards appearances in Iowa notes that he discussed poverty issues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA college of law symposium. The story also appeared on the Web sites of the WASHINGTON POST, WINSTON-SALEM JOURNAL, WASHINGTON POST, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, SACRAMENTO BEE, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, CBS NEWS, WRAL-TV (NC), WJLA-TV (Washington, D.C.), SCOTSMAN (UK), NEW HOPE COURIER (OK), CARLISLE SENTINEL (PA), JACKSON NEWS-TRIBUNE (WY), THE GUARDIAN (UK) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/politics/15762752.htm

Cub, Celtic Team To Help Stone Research (Boston Herald, Oct. 14)
A story about Project 3000, an initiative begun by Chicago Cubs first baseman Derrek Lee and Boston Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck to finance research to fight Leber's Congenital Amaurosis, an eye disease suffered by the children of both. The two of them put the plan together after being introduced by ED STONE, director of the Center for Macular Degeneration at the University of Iowa, who is treating their children.
http://celtics.bostonherald.com/celtics/view.bg?articleid=162250

Writer Remembers Working At UI (Contra Costa Times, Oct. 14)
A columnist writes about her first experience working as a typist, which occurred while she worked in the Pathology Department of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/local/states/california/15759225.htm

Lie Research Applied To Canadian Companies (Canadian Business, Oct. 13)
While an ever-widening stock-option scandal south of the border has U.S. investors angry and worried, Canadian investors may be feeling a little smug. But that conceit may be premature, at least according to a new report suggesting that some of Canada's largest companies may also be manipulating the timing of stock-option grants to give executives bigger bonuses. An analysis of options granted over the past three years by Canada's 60 largest and most heavily traded companies shows a troubling pattern of share prices falling in the days before options are granted, followed by a sharp upturn shortly afterward. The stock options backdating was uncovered by ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa, who studied thousands of U.S. companies.
http://www.canadianbusiness.com/managing/strategy/article.jsp?content=20060922_80700_80700

Gayley Comments On Spinning Star (Space.com, Oct. 13)
A sizzling-hot star is spinning around at near break-up velocity, according to a new study. Astronomers wonder if material will be ejected from the star, called Alpha Arae. Located about 300 light-years from Earth, Alpha Arae is the nearest "Be star"-a class of rapidly rotating stars that are very luminous, massive and hotter than the Sun. On Aug. 23, 1866, Italian astronomer Father Angelo Secchi discovered the first Be star, Gamma Cassiopeiae. Since then, the dizzying stars have continued to baffle astronomers. Just a couple 140-year-old puzzlers: How does the ring of gas that surrounds Be stars form? And what keeps the gas disk in motion? The new study results, which will be detailed in an upcoming issue of the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics, bring astronomers closer to answering these questions. Keeping gas particles swirling together in a disk requires top speed. "For material to be in orbit in a disk, it requires a great deal of angular momentum," said KEN GAYLEY, a researcher at the University of Iowa who was not involved in the study. A source of this rotational velocity would be from the central, rotating star.
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/060925_mm_star_spin.html

University Fosters Female Scientist (Times Leader, Oct. 13)
Rose Barkus attended Misericordia with the help of significant financial aid, as more than 96 percent of our students do. The opportunity to attend a small college where students matter was particularly helpful to Rosie, because she chose to enroll in a rigorous biology program. Rosie was like many of the students who attend our local colleges and universities; she simply didn't know how good she was in the academic world. Today, Rosie is studying at Indiana University where she is completing her dissertation on motor proteins, after turning down offers for doctorate fellowships at Cornell University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Texas. Her work has the potential to help find eventual cures for Alzheimer's and Huntingdon's diseases. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/news/opinion/15747828.htm

Nobel Prize Winner Had UI Fellowship (China Economic Net, Oct. 13)
Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk on Thursday won the 2006 Nobel Prize for literature, Turkey's semi-official Anatolia news agency reported. The Swedish Academy said that "Pamuk, in the quest for the melancholic soul of his native city, has discovered new symbols for the clash and interlacing of cultures." Pamuk was a visiting scholar at Columbia University in New YorkCity from 1985 to 1988, a period which also included a visiting fellowship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story, which also ran on the PEOPLE'S DAILY ONLINE website, originally appeared on the website of the XINGHUA news agency. A similar story appeared in. Similar stories appeared in DAILY INDIA, OUTLOOK INDIA, EXPATICA and PLANET GURU.
http://en.ce.cn/World/big-news/200610/13/t20061013_8946613.shtml

Nobel Prize Winner Wrote Book AT UI (Monsters and Critics, Oct. 13)
Orhan Pamuk, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday, is today Turkey's leading novelist. While taking a visiting fellow position at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA,  he wrote "The Black Book." http://books.monstersandcritics.com/features/article_1210649.php/Profile_Orhan_Pamuk_Turkeys_most_famous_living_author

Pamuk Book Written At UI (The Pioneer, Oct. 13)
Orhan Pamuk's seven published novels explore the way Turkey is torn between East and West and how it is split between conservative religious folk and modern Western-looking secularists. Pamuk, who won the Nobel Prize for literature, had a visiting fellow position at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where he wrote "The Black Book." The film "Hidden Face," based on a single page from "The Black Book," was released in Turkey. The publication is based in India.
http://www.dailypioneer.com/indexn12.asp?main_variable=OPED&file_name=opd3%2Etxt&counter_img=3

Poet Taught At UI (The Warren Reporter, Oct. 13)
The Warren County Community College (WCCC) Visiting Authors Series continues on Wednesday evening, Oct. 25, with a reading by renowned novelist and poet, Stephen Dobyns.Dobyns is the author of ten books of poetry and 20 novels. He has taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Boston University, and Sarah Lawrence College. The newspaper is based in New Jersey. http://www.nj.com/entertainment/warrenreporter/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/1160712653100220.xml&coll=15

UI Added Gender Protections To Policies (Washington Blade, Oct. 13)
As of last month, all of the eight colleges and universities that comprise the Ivy League have elected to include gender identity and expression in their non-discrimination policies, according to the Gender Public Advocacy Coalition. _ The first school to add gender protections to its policy was the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1996 and 21 schools added the protections in 2005.
http://www.washblade.com/2006/10-13/news/national/policy.cf

Successful Toffee Maker Profiled (East Valley Tribune, Oct. 12)
Kim Brownlee founded My Mom's Toffee Factory & Sweets Shoppe in 2000 The Scottsdale Airpark-based firm now has 15 employees, is set to leave its 1,000-square-foot office/kitchen/shipping plant for a 6,000-square-foot facility at a yet-to-be-determined site, and has found a niche in its industry. "I'm a huge advocate for education," said Brownlee, who will turn 38 today. "One of my biggest regrets was being a (college) dropout (at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA) as a freshman." She is now Brownlee is going after a master's degree in business administration at the University of Phoenix. The newspaper is based in Arizona.
http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/index.php?sty=76391

'Sun Rings' First Performed At UI (iBerkshhires.com, Oct. 12)
Sun Rings, an evening-length work in 10 movements performed by the Kronos Quartet. Written by Terry Riley, Sun Rings is a multimedia production featuring a choir and both sounds and images from space. The piece, commissioned for Kronos by NASA and others, received its first performance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in October 2002, and has since been performed in cities including London, San Francisco, Calgary, Tucson and Boston. The website is based in North Adams, Mass.
http://iberkshires.com/story.php?story_id=21221

Black Observes Compulsive Shopping Behavior (The Sun News, Oct. 12)
Uncontrolled shopping is a serious problem that can hurt relationships, ruin your credit and severely damage your bank account. How do you know if your shopping is out of control? Aside from hitting stores frequently, compulsive shoppers fantasize about their future purchases, find the process intensely exciting and feel guilty after they've finished buying, said DR. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. The newspaper is based in Myrtle Beach, S.C. http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/living/special_packages/vitality/15738318.htm

Berg Comments On Latest IEM Data (Futuretense.com, Oct. 12)
The money says Democrats will take over the U.S. House and Republicans wil keep the Senate in November. The projection isn't from a political poll but the current prediction by the Iowa Electronic Markets. The system allows traders from around the world to buy futures online based on possible political outcomes. The Iowa Electronics Markets started at the University of Iowa in 1988 allowing futures trades on the presidential race. The enterprise expanded to include other political races including the balance of power in midterm elections. Now the system is gauging the possible spread of flu outbreaks. Organizers of the effort say the markets have a 76 percent accuracy rate. JOYCE BERG is one of four University of Iowa faculty who run the electronic markets. She says organizers are watching another political issue: this month's passage by Congress of a bill banning online gambling. Those running prediction market sites, like the Iowa Electronic Markets, are worried they'll be lumped in with other gambling sites when it comes time to enforce the ban. Futuretense is a program produced by American Public Radio for broadcast on public radio stations.
http://www.publicradio.org/columns/futuretense/

Law Alumna Rowley Running For Congress (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 12)
Coleen Rowley is running a campaign for Congress in Minnesota's Sixth District that most of her supporters concede is a long shot. The former FBI agent and Time magazine's co-Person of the Year for 2002 is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Law.
http://www.startribune.com/587/story/737098.html

CNET Execs Claimed By Backdating Scandal (Law.com, Oct. 12)
CNET general counsel Sharon LeDuy and CEO Shelby Bonnie stepped down Wednesday after an internal investigation by the company found "deficiencies with the process by which options were granted at CNET, including in some instances the backdating of stock options grants" from 1996 through at least 2003. According to SEC filings, between 1999 and 2003 Le Duy received six options awards, and four of them came at quarterly lows in share price. The odds that four of six grants would come at quarterly lows is less than one in 880,000, according to an equation provided by ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor whose research on options grants raised awareness of the backdating phenomenon earlier this year.
http://www.law.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/View&c=LawArticle&cid=1160557526067&t=LawArticleTech

Schulz-Stubner Finds Hypnoses Effective (WQAD-TV, Oct. 12)
University of Iowa researchers are using hypnosis to ease pain. Research shows the technique may actually change the way the brain processes pain. "Hypnosis is effective probably in the range 65 to 70 percent," says Dr. SEBASTIAN SCHULZ-STUBNER, an anesthesiologist at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=5528636&nav=menu132_4

Nobel Literature Winner Was UI Fellow (The Chronicle of Higher Ed, Oct. 12)
Turkish novelist Orhan Pamuk, recipient of this year's Nobel Prize for literature, once held a visiting fellowship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Stories on the same topic appeared in the ANATOLIAN TIMES (Turkey), BANGKOK POST (Thailand), TURKISH PRESS and THE LOCAL (SWEDEN).
http://chronicle.com/free/2006/10/2006101203n.htm

Lie Advice: Admit To Backdating Before You're Caught (CNN, Oct. 11)
Two more CEOs hit by the scandal over stock options stepped down Wednesday, highlighting the risk to companies - and investors - stung by the backdating bullet. The chief executives of McAfee and CNET both resigned Wednesday, the latest fallout in the growing scandal over the timing of stock option grants. A lot of people involved in the backdating mess probably think not they're going to get caught, but that's a calculated risk they're taking, according to ERIK LIE, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa whose research first cast options backdating into the spotlight. With the list of companies hit by the options saga growing - and Lie expects the number of companies involved to grow to at least a couple of hundred - it's a good idea to get ahead of an investigation. "It's always better to come clean, restate and settle with anybody suing the company so you can move forward as soon as possible," he said.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/10/11/technology/options_backdating/?postversion=2006101116

GOP Takes Hit On IEM (CNN, Oct. 11)
The odds of Republicans controlling the next Congress have dropped sharply since news of the Congressional-page scandal broke, according to a "futures" market operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Iowa Electronic Market, which offers contracts on the outcomes of political and economic events, says the percentage of investors in the 2006 Congressional Control market believing Republicans will hold full control of Congress has dropped to 39 percent from 58.5 percent on Sept. 28, when news was revealed about Rep. Mark Foley's correspondence with pages.
http://money.cnn.com/2006/10/11/news/economy/markets_congress/?postversion=2006101114

Anderson Comments On 'Manorexia' (CBN News, Oct. 11)
For years pop culture has influenced young women with glamorous images that say thin is desirable. Dr. ARNOLD ANDERSON from the University of Iowa's College of Medicine says that attitude is now spreading to men. Anderson said, "We're certainly seeing more eating disorders in men. Some want to be wiry like Mick Jagger. Some want to be lean, muscular Brad Pitt."
http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/39577.aspx

Lie Research Leads To Dismissals (Tech News World, Oct. 11)
McAfee said Wednesday that it has fired its president and accepted the resignation of its CEO amid a widening scandal regarding stock options accounting. The firing and resignation are the latest high-profile casualties of what has become a massive scandal regarding the timing of and accounting for stock options grants. The practice may have led to billions of dollars worth of misstatements, according to University of Iowa associate business professor ERIK LIE. Lie estimates that as many as 15 percent of all options granted between 1996 and mid-2002 were back-dated, with a smaller percentage in more recent years. According to some estimates, that could represent costs of as much as $100 billion tied to the scandal, from legal fees and restatement costs to lost market value. Lie noted that options backdating is itself not illegal, but if companies misled regulators or investors by filing false statements about when grants were made, there could be legal exposure.
http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/53594.html

Nixon Studies Compound To Melt Snow, Ice (Newark Star Ledger, Oct. 11)
The New Jersey Department of Transportation is testing a road surface overlay known as SafeLane it hopes will reduce icing and prevent accidents at one particularly treacherous location this winter. SafeLane is a combination of epoxy and aggregate stone that is applied to the surface of a roadway and has the ability to absorb anti-icing chemicals. Road crews "charge" the overlay with chemicals like calcium chloride or magnesium chloride -- before frost, ice or snow are expected. The overlay then releases the chemicals as conditions develop for the formation of ice or snow. "This is a particular sort of aggregate that behaves like a sponge," said WILFRED NIXON, a professor of engineering at the University of Iowa. Nixon, considered an authority on snow and ice control, conducted a study of the nine sites in six states where SafeLane was applied last year. His report concluded "test sections remained clear of snow and ice under conditions when snow and ice were accumulating on control sections. In some circumstances, these accumulations on control sections were sufficient to contribute to accidents."
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-4/1160454997190710.xml&coll=1

Black: Compulsive Shoppers Feel Thrills, Guilt (Hartford Courant, Oct. 11)
Some call it therapy, others call it an irresistible urge. Either way, uncontrolled shopping is a serious problem that can hurt relationships, ruin your credit and severely damage your bank account. Between 2 and 8 percent of the U.S. population are considered compulsive shoppers - outnumbering the country's gambling addicts. Nine of 10 mega-shoppers are women. While the problem has existed for years, easy shopping on the Internet, stores that dazzle with enticing displays and a culture that glorifies shopping has fueled a new generation of extreme buyers. Aside from hitting stores frequently, compulsive shoppers fantasize about their future purchases, find the process intensely exciting and feel guilty after they've finished buying, said Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.courant.com/features/lifestyle/hc-socialshopping.artoct11,0,3004803.story?&track=rss

Barta Replacement Praised (Casper Star Tribune, Oct. 11)
An editorial praises the University of Wyoming for its selection of Tom Burman as the new athletic director, even though the names of the other finalists were not released to the public. Burman replaces GARY BARTA, who left for the University of Iowa.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articles/2006/10/11/editorial/editorial/278842b3c099403d87257203007ede46.txt

UI Beat Monmouth In First Game At Stadium (Galesburg Register Mail, Oct. 10)
Monmouth College in Illinois was the first college team to take on the Hawkeyes after the opening of the new Iowa Stadium on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus after it opened in October 1929. Iowa beat Monmouth 46-0. The Register Mail is based in Illinois.
http://www.register-mail.com/stories/101006/WIL_BB5SPD82.GID.shtml

Fox To Premiere Piece At UI (The Black World Today, Oct. 10)
A column about jazz pianist Donal Fox notes that he will be premiering a new piece at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this year.
http://www.tbwt.org/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=635&Itemid=40

A story about the same topic appeared in the magazine EurWeb.com (Oct. 10):

http://www.eurweb.com/story/eur24276.cfm

Touch Considered As Healing Measure (The Independent, Oct. 10)
Touch, a key component of traditional healing, is being increasingly studied in mainstream medicine, with some trials showing symptom benefits in a number of areas, from asthma and high blood pressure to migraine and childhood diabetes. Other research findings hint that not only does touch lower stress levels, but that it can boost the immune system and halt or slow the progress of disease. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a study is looking at the effects of healing touch on 64 women with advanced cervical cancer. Researchers say the aim is to see whether touch can boost the immune system and improve the body's natural defences against the disease. The newspaper is based in the United Kingdom. http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health_medical/article1827281.ece

Internet Gambling Law Proposed (Houston Chronicle, Oct. 10)
Last month, as Congress rushed to adjourn, lawmakers passed legislation that would make it a crime for credit card companies and banks to send payments to Internet gambling sites. The aim was to reduce gambling addiction and money laundering. The prohibition on Internet gambling could wind up putting the kibosh on several forms of Internet wagering that provide useful information, such as information markets, which have outperformed experts in a number of areas, whether it's predicting point spreads in football games or elections or printer sales. There are more than 20 Web sites that offer information-market securities, including those run by Goldman Sachs and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The commentary originally appeared in the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/editorial/outlook/4246941.html

Hog Lot Emissions Cited As Hazard (New York Newsday, Oct. 10)
Giant hog farms, known as concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs, have arrived. Researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University, as well as scientists at the Centers for Disease Control, say that confined hog operations' air emissions are a hazard to public health and worker health.
http://www.newsday.com/news/columnists/ny-carter4926613oct11,0,3896620.column

Futures Markets Predicted Election Outcomes (Pittsburg Tribune-Review, Oct. 10)
Economists say political futures markets, in which people put money on those they think will win, tend to be an accurate crystal ball of what will happen on election night.Political futures traders don't buy goods. Instead, they buy "contracts" on election results. If they pick the winner, they get cash. One market by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has correctly forecast every presidential race since it opened in 1988. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/cityregion/s_474260.html

Discovery May Fight AIDS (KPTM-TV, Oct. 10)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
researchers hope a recent discovery will help in the fight against AIDS. Researchers have isolated a small section of an obscure, benign virus that slows the AIDS virus in cell cultures. In 2001, doctors announced that people infected with the AIDS virus stay healthy much longer if they also happened to be infected with the benign virus -- known as GBVC. Researchers hope the latest discovery will lead to the development of a medicine using the same principle to delay the onset of AIDS. The TV station is located in Nebraska.
http://www.kptm.com/news/local/4358081.htm

Professor Shares Classroom Trick (Business Week Online, Oct. 9)
On a Tuesday afternoon last fall, Professor Jeff Hart noticed that the students in his Security Valuation & Selection class at Southern Methodist University were beginning to lose interest in the topic at hand. He knew what to do. "Did you hear that Katie Holmes is pregnant with Tom Cruise's baby?" he asked the class of 60. After a lively five-minute discussion about who was dating who in Hollywood, the class was revitalized, and Hart continued on with finance. It was a trick Hart learned while a freshman at the University of Iowa. A religion professor named JAY HOLSTEIN would make a point during each of his lectures to stop and tell a humorous anecdote or joke. "You wanted to come to class for that part alone," Hart says. Now he regularly uses the technique, and it has the same effect. http://news.yahoo.com/s/bw/20061009/bs_bw/bs20060921670074;_ylt=Amst7X4lCR77.9oUvw8uFa21v0gC;_ylu=X3oDMTA5aHJvMDdwBHNlYwN5bmNhdA-

Wyoming Names New Athletic Director (Rocky Mountain News, Oct. 9)
University of Wyoming administrator Tom Burman, a Laramie native, has been named the school's new athletic director. Burman replaces Gary Barta, who left Wyoming in June to become athletic director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Colorado. Similar articles also appeared on the websites of ABC 27 in Pennsylvania, the CASPER STAR-TRIBUNE in Wyoming.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/ncaa/article/0,2777,DRMN_23932_5055273,00.html

Candidate Attended UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Oct. 9)
At Republican Fourth District convention in Minnesosta, Obi Sium was nominated to run against U.S. Rep. Betty McCollum. Sium became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1982 after leaving the African nation of Eritrea in 1973. If he wins, Sium said, he would be the first African-born person in Congress. He emigrated to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to get a graduate engineering degree. When Sium and his wife, Abeba, arrived in Iowa City, he had two suitcases and no clothes for winter. But the warmth of the reception they received solidified his love affair with the United States. http://www.startribune.com/587/story/732153.html

Osterberg Comments On Wind Power (Press Enterprise, Oct. 9)
Commercial wind farms have faced resistance when trying to sell their power to utility companies, says DAVID OSTERBERG, director of the University of Iowa's Environmental Health Sciences Research Center."That's one of the problems with renewable energy, it's not the technology but who is going to buy it." The newspaper is based in Southern California.
http://www.pe.com/lifestyles/homeandgarden/stories/PE_Fea_Daily_D_greentech1009.59cda6.html

Tattoos' Popularity Examined (Kansas City Star, Oct. 9)
A photo shows an Iowa Hawkeye adorning Gabe Barton's back. Barton, who is married, has a degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and works at a downtown advertising agency, has two tattoos. "I've always liked tattoos, and I really can't explain why." Never before have tattoos been as mainstream. Gone are the days when the only people who visited tattoo shops were sailors and bikers. http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/15712952.htm

Internet Gambling Law Could Thwart UI Research (New York Times, Oct. 9)
Last month, as Congress rushed to adjourn, lawmakers passed legislation that would make it a crime for credit card companies and banks to send payments to Internet gambling sites. The aim was to reduce gambling addiction and money laundering. The prohibition on Internet gambling could wind up putting the kibosh on several forms of Internet wagering that provide useful information.... Information markets have outperformed experts in a number of areas, whether it's predicting point spreads in football games or elections or printer sales. There are more than 20 Web sites that offer information-market securities, including those run by Goldman Sachs and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/09/opinion/09hahn.html

Political Markets Show Futures' Predictive Role (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 9)
In May, futures contracts based on home prices began trading on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. That market forecasts a downturn, and economic experts are taking this outlook seriously given the proven predictive capability of futures markets. Washington types have closely followed the political futures market run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ever since it called the 1992 presidential tally more accurately than major polls, the story reports. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116035776683786362.html?mod=hps_us_at_glance_columnists

UI Poet Lived 'Same Old Horror Story' (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Oct. 9)
Haki R. Madhubuti, a prolific poet and memoirist who earned a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is returning to his hometown in Arkansas to discuss his new book, "Yellow Black: The First Twenty-One Years of a Poet's Life." Founder and director of the Third World Press in Chicago, Madhubuti, is the author of nearly 30 books. He says his story of growing up black and poor "to some, is America's same old horror story... For me, it is the first 21 years that shaped and prepared me."
http://www.nwanews.com/adg/Style/169084/

Lie Sniffed Out Options Scandal (Star-Tribune, Oct. 8)
ERIK LIE, "A low-key UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor from Norway, is at the center of the controversy over backdated stock options." Referring to the recent arrest of former Comverse Technology CEO Jacob Alexander, who was on the lam in Namibia when he was nicked by authorities for secretly manipulating stock options, Lie said the unfolding boardroom drama includes "movie-worthy material." A native of Norway, Lie has been an associate professor and research fellow at the HENRY B. TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS at the University of Iowa since 2004. The Star-Tribune is published in Minneapolis.
http://www.startribune.com/535/story/727298.html

Stone Hails 'Miraculous' Effects of New Vision Drug (medilexicon.com, Oct. 8)
The results of two large, randomized clinical trials published Oct. 5, 2006, in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrate that the drug ranibizumab is an effective treatment for neovascular macular degeneration. In an accompanying editorial, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator EDWIN M. STONE at the University of Iowa contends that now that these trials have shown the drug's "miraculous" effects on patients' eyesight, a crucial next step is to compare ranibizumab to a related drug, bevacizumab. Bevacizumab also appears to be effective in treating neovascular macular degeneration. Importantly, a single dose of bevacizumab costs less than $150, compared to more than $2,000 per dose for ranibizumab.
http://www.medilexicon.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=53440

Anderson Comments On Eating Disorders (ABC News, Oct. 7)
DR. ARNOLD ANDERSON
the director of the eating disorders unit at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, said " We're certainly seeing more eating disorders in men. Some want to be wiry-thin Mick Jagger. Some want to be lean muscular, Brad Pitt, James Bond. Some want to be big and chiseled like Arnold, the governor."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=2c3fbf4bca0ce2545ea0e9d42a8e5d5d&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVlz-zSkVb&_md5=91e6556c7afd3775c9f30733c6f5aa12

Iowan Makes Customized Bobbleheads (Christian Science Monitor, Oct. 6)
When Bryan Guise made his first customized bobblehead in 2002, he had no intention of positioning himself at the center of two converging trends: the resurgent popularity of bobbleheads and a broader consumer desire for customization. Business has held steady since then, even as competition has increased; he makes about 1,000 dolls per year. Guise earned a bachelor's in ceramics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before starting It's You Small, a one-man operation out of the basement of his Des Moines home.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/1006/p11s01-lign.html

Stone Advises On Eye Disease Drugs (New York Times, Oct. 6)
The National Institutes of Health said yesterday that it would sponsor a clinical trial comparing two Genentech drugs that have sharply different costs as a treatment for the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. If the drugs prove to be equivalent in treating the eye condition, called age-related macular degeneration, it would probably mean that many eye doctors would switch to the cheaper drug, hurting Genentech's sales but saving the Medicare program hundreds of millions of dollars a year. The more expensive drug, Lucentis, was approved for use in treating the eye disease in June and by all accounts is a major advance, allowing many patients to read, recognize faces or even drive again. Lucentis costs $1,950 an injection, with injections needed as often as once a month. In an editorial published yesterday in The New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. EDWIN M. STONE of the University of Iowa said that "a large and growing body of anecdotal experience" suggested that Avastin was effective. Those reports, coupled with the price difference, Stone wrote, "suggest that a head-to-head comparison of the two drugs is warranted." http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/06/business/06drug.html?ex=1160798400&en=56e1fdadccd86eec&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVERNEWS

Stone Comments On Eye Treatment (China Post, Oct. 6)
Lucentis, an antibody designed to bind to and inhibit a protein that plays a role in the formation of new blood vessels, can help prevent vision loss from "wet" age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common cause of blindness in older adults. In a related editorial, Dr. EDWIN M. STONE, from University of Iowa in Iowa City, comments that before Lucentis (ranibizumab) became available, many doctors were using bevacizumab, an antibody therapy originally approved for advanced colon cancer. Early reports suggested that this agent, which is much less expensive than Lucentis, is safe and effective for wet AMD. "A head-to-head study of Lucentis and bevacizumab and a careful evaluation of an 'induction and follow-up' strategy with either drug are probably the next most useful steps in this field," Stone concludes. The article originally appeared in REUTERS HEALTH.
http://www.chinapost.com.tw/supplement/detail.asp?ID=92180&GRP=k

Jarreau Graduated From UI (The Northwestern, Oct. 6)
In an interview with renowned jazz singer Al Jarreau, he notes that he went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and completed a master's degree in vocational rehabilitation counseling, all the while he was singing. The newspaper is based in Oshkosh, Wis.
http://www.thenorthwestern.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061005/OSH05/61004025/11

UI Student's Play To Be Staged (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Oct. 6)
An intercontinental route brought "Diva Daughters Dupree" to a stage in Seattle. A Los Angeles theater aficionado sent playwright Kim Euell's comedy drama about three strong-minded sisters to a Seattle theater aficionado, who showed it to Jackie Moscou, who e-mailed Euell in Nairobi. Euell, a Stanford University graduate, has been bouncing back and forth for the past year between Los Angeles and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she is working on a master of fine arts degree in theater.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/theater/287676_theater06.html

Executive Allegedly Violated Securities Laws (Jerusalem Post, Oct. 5)
Jacob "Kobi" Alexander was released on bail from a Namibian jail this week. Alexander is the founder and former chief executive officer and chairman of Comverse Technology Inc., a provider of telecommunications applications. Alexander and other company officials were charged in New York in July with conspiring to violate U.S. securities laws and commit mail and wire fraud. The charges stem from Comverse's backdating of the stock options it issued to its executives and employees. Doesn't sound "nice." But illegal?_ According to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which has published extensive research on the subject, it's not necessarily a breach of law, if no documents have been forged and the backdating is communicated clearly to shareholders and is reflected properly in earnings and taxes._ "Unfortunately, these conditions are rarely met, making backdating of grants illegal in most cases," the university says.
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid=1159193379466&pagename=JPost%2FJPArticle%2FShowFull

Osterberg Comments On Wind Power (The Daily Advance, Oct. 5)
Commercial wind farms have faced resistance when trying to sell their power to utility companies, says DAVID OSTERBERG, director of the University of Iowa's Environmental Health Sciences Research Center."That's one of the problems with renewable energy, it's not the technology but who is going to buy it." The newspaper serves Elizabeth City, N.C.
http://www.dailyadvance.com/featr/content/shared-gen/ap/asap/Money_and_Gadgets/asap_MoneyGadgets_Why_the_Delay.html

Wang Co-Authored Advertising Study (U.S.News and World Report, Oct. 5)
Companies pay top dollar to get advertisements in "premium" spots near the end of TV programs. But that system may not work so well after all. A new study finds that the more consumers are absorbed in the narrative flow of a story, the more likely they are to resent the ads that disrupt it. A new study in the September issue of the Journal of Consumer Research shows that the more consumers are absorbed in the narrative flow of a story-a process known as "transportation"-the less likely they are to respond positively to advertisements. "Media create the audience for most advertising. Consumers come to a medium for its content," explains Bobby Calder of the Kellogg School of Management and JING WANG of the University of Iowa. "If the ad interrupts the transportation experience, this in itself creates a negative experience associated with the ad."
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/biztech/articles/061005/5mediatransportation.htm

Berg: IEM More Accurate Than Polls (Boston Herald, Oct. 5)
The University of Iowa runs a financial-style exchange that lets ordinary Americans speculate on election results the way traders in New York speculate on future stock, oil or coffee prices. In 16 years the Iowa Electronic Markets have turned into a significant political barometer. Iowa professor JOYCE BERG says that, over time, it has proven to be three times more accurate than the opinion polls as a predictor of election results.
http://business.bostonherald.com/businessNews/view.bg?articleid=160769

Stone Supports Lucentis, Avastin Trials (The Guardian, Oct. 5)
Eye specialists are calling for trials which would set a hugely expensive new blindness-preventing drug against a cheap alternative which many doctors are already using on their patients. EDWIN STONE of the University of Iowa said that now the trials had shown the "miraculous" effect of the drugs on patients' sight, it was crucial to hold trials comparing Avastin and Lucentis. While they were waiting for Lucentis to be approved, doctors were using Avastin in patients who would otherwise soon go blind, and they published papers about their results. "These were not randomised, double-masked trials," he said, "but to those of us who had been taking care of people with this disease for a while, it was evident that this was pretty potent stuff - the best we'd ever had. Tens of thousands of doses of Avastin were given nationwide, while doctors were waiting for ranibizumab [Lucentis] to get approved, and it often worked very well." The Guardian is based in the UK. A story on the same topic appeared in SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
http://society.guardian.co.uk/health/story/0,,1887700,00.html

Squire: Foley Scandal Is Distraction For Bush (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 5)
President Bush has launched an aggressive October campaign to protect his party's control of Congress with claims that the GOP is "tough" on terrorism and the Democrats "soft," but the president has encountered a damaging distraction in the page scandal surrounding former Rep. Mark Foley that threatens to obscure his party's message. "Clearly, voters are consumed at the moment by the Foley scandal," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "That makes it difficult for the president's message to get through. "The president's argument about the war in Iraq and the war on terror gets lost - this isn't a point in time where nuances come through," Squire said. "I don't know if it will be the center of discussion for the next four weeks. But it will be percolating along. It certainly will complicate the Republicans' efforts to focus on issues they'd rather discuss." The same story also appeared on the Web site of the KANSAS CITY STAR, COLUMBUS (GA) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, COLUMBIA (SC) STATE, BILOXI (MS) SUN HERALD and numerous other news organizations. http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0610050119oct05,1,3166372.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

UI Professor Examines Race-Based 'Survivor' (Philadelphia Inquirer, Oct. 5)
In an op-ed piece, University of Iowa law professor and 'Survivor' fanatic ANGELA ONWAUCHI WILLIG looks at the show's decision to divide this season's tribes based on race.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/editorial/15680932.htm

UI Alumnus New South Dakota School Head (Sioux Falls Argus Leader, Oct. 5)
A story about David Pappone, the new superintendent of schools in Brandon, S.D., notes that he was in the Ph.D. program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA but has not yet written his dissertation.
http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061005/NEWS03/610050327/1001/NEWS

Alumnus Attends Senior College in Texas (Austin American Statesman, Oct. 5)
Lee Zane is a student who likes school. He likes it for a lot of the same reasons other students do: getting out of the house, field trips and seeing people he hasn't seen since last semester. The only noticeable difference between Zane and the average college student is years: nearly 70 of them. Zane, 87, is one of almost 340 students taking classes this year at Senior University, a private nonprofit institution in Georgetown that offers noncredit courses and programs to people age 50 or over. The last time Zane was a college student was in 1939, when he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/10/05/5boomers.html

Novel Started At UI Workshop (Dunwoody Crier, Oct. 4)
"Micha's Child," a novel, written in a collaboration between Chattahoochee High teacher Mike Buchanan and Diane Lang of Chesterfield, Va., tells the story of a suburbanite trying to overcome the death of her child some 25 years earlier. "Diane and I enrolled in a writing workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and she asked me if she could use my stories in her novel. I said 'yes,' and we began working together," said Buchanan. The newspaper is based in Georgia.
http://www.thecrier.net/articles/2006/10/04/news/novel.txt

Lie Research Cited In Apple CFO Resignation (The Register, Oct. 4)
The fall-out over the All-American Stock Options Scam continues, with Apple's former chief financial officer, Fred Anderson, resigning from the board. The company raised "serious concerns" over the actions of two former unnamed officers of the company in accounting for options awards between 1997 and 2002. Apple has uncovered stock option grants on 15 dates between 1997 and 2002 that appeared to have been backdated. The corporate stock options scandal was uncovered in research by ERIK LIE, a finance professor at the University of Iowa. The Register is published in the UK.
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/10/04/apple_stock_options_review/

Foley News Sends Republicans Crashing On IEM (Muckraker.com, Oct. 4)
Early polls gauging the effect of the Foley scandal on the Republicans' ability to hold on to Congress are just beginning to trickle in, with murky results. But another indicator has reacted instinctively and decisively: political futures markets, including the Iowa Electronic Markets at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After news of the scandal broke last week, the likelihood that the GOP would keep the House spiked downward in two of the most popular online markets -- real-time exchange systems where traders buy and sell "contracts" based on their predictions of how the upcoming elections will result.
http://www.tpmmuckraker.com/archives/001688.php

UI Study Finds Cause Of "Killer Electrons" (CNN, Oct. 4)
Weather that originates at the sun, not here on Earth, is responsible for radio waves that cause an unusual shape of two belts of radiation that encircle Earth and contain "killer electrons" that can damage satellites and pose a risk to space travelers, scientists report. It has long been known that low-frequency radio waves in space, known as plasmaspheric hiss, split the Van Allen radiation belts into two donuts of dangerous energetic electrons that travel at nearly the speed of light and are trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Last year, NASA scientists reported evidence that lightning on Earth leaked radio waves into space and, after bouncing around in the magnetic field surrounding Earth, created the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts. A team of scientists with the British Antarctic Survey, University of California and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA saw that they could test this theory by investigating whether there were more waves over Earth's continents than its oceans, because lightning occurs ten times more frequently over land than sea.
http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/10/04/space.hiss/

Black: Compulsive Shoppers Feel Thrills, Guilt (Seattle Times, Oct. 4)
Some call it therapy, others call it an irresistible urge. Either way, uncontrolled shopping is a serious problem that can hurt relationships, ruin your credit and severely damage your bank account. Between 2 and 8 percent of the U.S. population are considered compulsive shoppers - outnumbering the country's gambling addicts. Nine of 10 mega-shoppers are women. While the problem has existed for years, easy shopping on the Internet, stores that dazzle with enticing displays and a culture that glorifies shopping has fueled a new generation of extreme buyers. Aside from hitting stores frequently, compulsive shoppers fantasize about their future purchases, find the process intensely exciting and feel guilty after they've finished buying, said Dr. DONALD BLACK, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/living/2003287344_lifcompulsive04.html

UI Stability Control Study Cited (Detroit News, Oct. 4)
A columnist writing about new federal mandates requiring new cars to have electronic stability control systems cites a 2004 study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that determined that stability control can help a third of U.S. drivers maintain control of their vehicles in certain situations.
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061004/OPINION03/610040322/1149/AUTO03

NCAA's Westerhaus Came From UI (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 4)
When the NCAA created its Office of Diversity and Inclusion in 2005, Charlotte Westerhaus was a natural to step in as vice president of the division. Since joining the National Collegiate Athletic Association in August 2005, Westerhaus, who previously was director of equal opportunity and diversity at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has spent about 80 percent of her time traveling. She meets with university presidents, athletic directors, coaches and student athletes to discuss how to improve diversity and inclusion in intercollegiate athletics. Those issues are key, she said, not just within an organization, but within any kind of team working toward a common goal. "Inclusion is a climate where everyone brings their talents to the table," Westerhaus said. "So a mission for a team is to win. And you bring your talents that support winning. But you also bring your individual attributes -- your cultural background, where you were raised, your race and your gender -- which shape who you are. So how do you bring the skills that can help the team win, and the skills that make you you, to help your team become successful? That's inclusion."
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061004/BUSINESS/610040408/-1/ZONES04

Atchison New Hygienic Lab Director (WCCO-TV, Oct. 4)
The University of Iowa announced Tuesday that it has replaced the director of its hygienic laboratory. The university announced that CHRISTOPHER ATCHISON would serve as interim director of the lab, which is a major player in protecting the state's residents against disease. WCCO is based in Minneapolis.
http://wcco.com/iowawire/IA-BRF--LabDirector1s_k_n_0ia--/resources_news_html

Ferguson Comments On Weight Loss Motivation (Wilmington Star News, Oct. 3)
A comment such as, "You've gained weight!" could be the best thing that ever happened to you. A study done at the University of Colorado and reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates that for a majority of weight-loss maintainers success was usually preceded by a "trigger event or critical incident." These events could be medical (a doctor tells you to lose weight), emotional (someone makes a derogatory comment about your weight) or a life event (a divorce). Other motivating factors might be a wedding or divorce, a school reunion, an anniversary, birthday, college graduation or a new job. But will it last? A special or life-changing event is a great motivator in the short run. However, once the goal is achieved, it can be difficult to maintain motivation, says KRISTI J. FERGUSON, an associate professor at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. To make it last, use the special event as a kicking-off point, but plan in advance what you're going to use as a motivator beyond the special event to maintain your weight loss. The Star News is based in Wilmington, NC. The same story appeared on the Web site of THE STATE (S.C.) and NORWALK (CT) ADVOCATE.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061003/NEWS/610030325/1051

UI Study Finds Cause Of "Killer Electrons" (MSNBC.com, Oct. 3)
Weather that originates at the Sun, not here on Earth, is responsible for radio waves that cause an unusual shape of two belts of radiation that encircle Earth and contain "killer electrons" that can damage satellites and pose a risk to space travelers, scientists report. It has been long known that low-frequency radio waves in space, known as plasmaspheric hiss, split the Van Allen radiation belts into two donuts of dangerous energetic electrons that travel at nearly the speed of light and are trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Last year, NASA scientists reported evidence that lightning on Earth leaked radio waves into space and, after bouncing around in the magnetic field surrounding Earth, created the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts. A team of scientists with the British Antarctic Survey, University of California and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA saw that they could test this theory by investigating whether there were more waves over Earth's continents than its oceans, because lightning occurs ten times more frequently over land than sea. The same story appeared on the Web site of SPACE.com.
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/15117711/

Book Based On Personal Ads (Ft. Lauderdale Sun Sentinel, Oct. 3)
Michael Beaumier has written "I Know You're Out There: Private Longings, Public Humiliations and Other Tales From the Personals," a  book about the people who place romantic ads in the Chicago Reader. Beaumier, now a New Yorker and a contributor to public radio's "This American Life," went to college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and attended graduate school at Ohio State.
http://www.southflorida.com/news/chi-0610030271oct03,0,3878836.story?coll=sfe-news-headlines

Fiddler Earned UI Degree (Huntington News, Oct. 3)
The Ohio Valley Symphony opens its season Oct.7, 2006, with a concert of both classical and popular music. Andy Carlson, grand champion fiddler, will join forces with OVS. He earned a doctorate in music from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While earning his degree, he was the recipient of the Iowa Performance Fellowship and the Pelzer Competition Fellowship. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://www.huntingtonnews.net/local/061002-staff-carlson.html

Stone To Do Eye Disease Research (Boston Globe, Oct. 3)
Boston Celtics CEO Wyc Grousbeck has partnered with baseball player Derrek Lee to cure Leber congenital amaurosis, an important cause of genetic blindness in children. ``We organized this in about a week, but there's a lot of substance behind it," Grousbeck told us yesterday. Project 3000 will provide state-of-the-art genetic testing for everyone in the United States with LCA and ID the remaining genes responsible . (Not coincidentally, Lee's 3-year-old daughter, Jada, and Grousbeck's 14-year-old son, Campbell, both have the disease.) Top retina specialist DR. EDWIN STONE of the University of Iowa will do the research. http://www.boston.com/news/globe/living/articles/2006/10/03/judge_unmoved_by_browns_travails/

Ferguson Advises on Dieting (Wilmington Star, Oct. 3)
A study done at the University of Colorado Health Science Center and reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates that for a majority of weight-loss maintainers success was usually preceded by a "trigger event or critical incident." This event could be medical, emotional or a life event. However, "The decision to lose weight, and the reasons behind the decision, do not necessarily differentiate the successful dieter from the unsuccessful dieter. In fact, the decision may only start the process but be insufficient to maintain enthusiasm beyond a few months," says KRISTI J. FERGUSON, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. The newspaper is based in South Carolina. The article also appeared in the NEWS-LEADER in Springfield, Mo.
http://www.wilmingtonstar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061003/NEWS/610030313/1005/sports

Book Based On Personal Ads (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 3)
Michael Beaumier has written a book "I Know You're Out There: Private Longings, Public Humiliations and Other Tales From the Personals." It's about the people who place romantic ads placed in the Chicago Reader. Beaumier, now a New Yorker and a contributor to public radio's "This American Life," went to college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and attended graduate school at Ohio State.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/chi-0610030271oct03,1,3527315.story

Pope Advises on Easing Back Pain (Post Chronicle, Oct. 2)
In this article, several tips are given to reduce stress while driving. When you're standing, the lumbar area of your spine (the lower portion) normally curves inward, toward your abdomen. However, when you're sitting, it tends to slump outward squeezing your spinal disks and putting stress on them. According to back expert MALCOLM POPE, Ph.D., director of the Iowa Spine Research Center at the University of Iowa, it helps to support your back by tucking a rolled towel or a pillow in that lumbar section. In cases of longer drives, since sitting in one position for longer than 15 minutes gradually stiffens you even with a back pillow, make necessary adjustments for a comfy ride. The publication is based in New York.
http://www.postchronicle.com/commentary/article_21242254.shtml

IEM Noted as Election Market (CNN Money, Oct. 2)
In an article about prediction markets' use in business, it's noted that in 1988 a handful of University of Iowa economists, surprised by Jesse Jackson's win in the Michigan presidential primary, set up a legal market for elections. Called the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, it eventually allowed people to buy as much as $500 in stock - initially through on-campus terminals - in presidential and congressional candidates. To date it has traded predictions on more than 250 candidates in 12 countries and has proven a better forecaster than the best opinion polls. The article originally appeared in BUSINESS 2.0.
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/business2_archive/2006/09/01/8384339/index.htm

Artist Attended UI (White Beacon, Oct. 2)
White River Gallery in Montague is showcasing Valerie B Boet's work as featured artist during October. In addition to baskets, the exhibit will include works in the many other art forms in her repertoire such as oil, watercolor and collage Boet began her education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA intending to become a nurse but soon switched her major and graduated with a degree in art, focusing on oil painting. The newspaper is based in Michigan.
http://www.whitelakebeacon.com/news.php?story_id=11100

Barber Hits New Career Peak (jazzpolice.com, Oct. 2)
Patricia Barber, a consistent winner of Downbeat's "Talent Deserving Wider Recognition," has hit a new career peak with her CD song cycle based on Ovid's "Metamorphosis." Barber studied psychology and classical music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before she switched to jazz. Jazzpolice.com originates in the California Bay Area.
http://www.jazzpolice.com/content/view/6396/72/

Iowa Futures Market Examined by Wall Street (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 2)
Wall Street hires a small army of analysts to keep on eye on Washington, and the potential political fortunes of the two major parties. And the popular assumption is that the market performs better when one house of Congress is controlled by the party not in the White House. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's much-watched election-futures markets -- historically pretty reliable -- gave House Democrats a 50 percent-plus chance in the summer, but only 43 percent on Friday."
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB115930004033274613.html?mod=hps_us_at_glance_sr

Chicago Rocker Attended UI (Chicago Sun-Times, Oct. 1)
Chicago rock star Ralph Covert, leader of Bad Examples, studied English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he also "took tons of music classes."
http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/78637,SHO-Sunday-ralph01.article

Ferguson Comments On Diet Motivation (Poughkeepsie Journal, Oct. 1)
A wedding or divorce, a school reunion, an anniversary, birthday, college graduation or a new job all can trigger a determination to lose weight. But will it last? "A special or life-changing event is a great motivator in the short run. However, once the goal is achieved, it can be difficult to maintain motivation, said KRISTI J. FERGUSON, an associate professor at the University Of Iowa Carver College Of Medicine. The story also appeared in the Kennebec Journal in Maine.
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061001/COLUMNISTS05/610010318

Lie Comments On SafeNet Scandal (Baltimore Sun, Oct. 1)
SafeNet's recent revelation that stock-option backdating skewed its books by $20 million has raised new questions about the legal implications of backdating. "We're still pretty early when it comes to the legal process," says ERIK LIE, the University of Iowa professor who did more than anybody to blow the whistle on backdating. "Everybody's trying to figure out what will happen."
http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/investing/bal-bz.hancock01oct01,0,7907192.column?track=rss

Squire Analyses Romney Strategy (Boston Globe, Oct. 1)
As chairman of the Republican Governors Association, Mitt Romney has directed the organization's largest contributions to candidates in three states, including Iowa, that are key to any presidential run -- his. "If Nussle wins, it gives [Romney] a friend in the governor's seat here, which can be useful as you look forward to the caucuses," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Even more important than that, it gives him a presence here, and elevates his profile among party activists. That's how you put together a campaign organization."
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2006/10/01/romney_directs_gop_cash_to_campaign_states/

 

 

 

 

 

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