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UI in the News

September, 2005

See UI in the New Archive Index

 

Current News Highlights

Multi-Media Correspondent Career Touted (Seventeen, November 2005)
In a section about choosing the best college, it's noted that a multi-media correspondent is one of the best jobs for the future if you're an adventure seeker. These correspondents report, write, shoot and file news stories and this career is big because news outlets are  cutting costs by having just one person prepare news stories for TV, radio, print and the Web. The magazine recommends studing this field at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA because its media program teaches cutting edge methods.

Women Poets Write About Housework (Chicago Sun Times, Sept. 30)
A new book, Sweeping Beauty: Contemporary Women Poets Do Housework (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS: $24.95), brings several dozen accomplished women out of the linen closet and addresses the normally mundane subject of housework with poetic grace. Poems like Julia Alvarez' "How I Learned to Sweep'' and Alison Townsend's "Hospital Corners,'' about the proper way to make a bed, describe the exacting lessons that somehow, even in the most liberated households, seem to be learned mainly by daughters. 
http://www.suntimes.com/output/pickett/cst-nws-pickett30.html

Investment Study Noted (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 30)
A recent study that suggests that people who have had some sort of brain damage are liable to do better in the world of high finance than people who haven't. A Reuters news story details the study in which 41 people played an investment game. A subset within the group, who had lesions on "the areas of the brain that effect emotions" did better than the others, who avoided risks. The story says "one of the researchers, ANTOINE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, said the best stock-market investors might plausibly be called 'functional psychopaths.' " The newspaper is based in Florida.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/columnists/orl-langley3005sep30,0,33687.column?coll=calcoltop

Eating Disorders, Anxiety Linked (Reuters, Sept. 30)
Adolescent girls with eating disorders are at risk of also developing anxiety disorders, and vice versa, according to a new study. DR. PAMELA K. KEEL, of the University of Iowa, Iowa City, and colleagues examined the simultaneous occurrence of eating disorders and mood disorders among 672 female twins (ages 16 to 18 years) from the Minnesota Twin Family Study. The subjects completed structured interviews that determined the presence of anorexia or bulimia, and assessed mood, anxiety, and substance use. Eating disorders were highly likely to co-exist with major depression, anxiety disorders, and nicotine dependence, the investigators report in the International Journal of Eating Disorders. The article also appeared on the website of ABC News. http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=healthNews&storyID=2005-09-29T192141Z_01_EIC969718_RTRIDST_0_HEALTH-EATING-DISORDERS-ANXIETY-DC.XML&archived=False

Pink Locker Room Controversy Noted (MSNBC, Sept, 28)
On the "Situation" program, host Tucker Carlson noted the controversy over pink locker room at Kinnick Stadium. "For decades now the locker room for the visiting football team at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has been painted pink. The lockers, the carpeting, even the toilets are bright pink. It`s some kind of psychological warfare apparently. Well critics now want the locker room changed because they say it demeans women and perpetuates stereotypes about homosexuality. One law professor at the school calls the locker room "sexist, homophobic and offensive," he said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=190359cfc7ee9555b166792812c50f9d&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkVA&_md5=7982c676fdf20c07d863f52700d89132

Other Recent News Highlights

Merrill Comments On Negative U.S. Image (Savannah Morning News, Sept. 29)
Just days after a U.S. Army private was found guilty of abuse at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, the Pentagon faces a fresh crisis that experts warn will only further damage the U.S. image abroad. The mainstream media Wednesday picked up a story that had been circulating for weeks in the foreign press and on Internet blogs: That U.S. troops appear to be posting photos of Iraqi corpses online in exchange for access to a pornographic Web site. That news could create another anti-American backlash in the Middle East that may further endanger U.S. troops, said Larry J. Korb, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and former Assistant Secretary of Defense. The U.S. State Department was recently warned about this image problem by a congressionally mandated advisory panel that warned "America's image and reputation abroad could hardly be worse." The report, which has been seen by senior officials but not officially released, was obtained Wednesday by the Savannah Morning News. It said the invasion of Iraq, the Abu Ghraib scandal and the handling of detainees at Guantanamo Bay has many in the world viewing America as "less a beacon of hope than a dangerous force to be countered." CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa, wrote the report, which recommends funding more cultural exchange programs between America and the Middle East to counter growing bad will. "What people see is an American failure, and these photos are just the latest failure, which points to a kind of moral blindness," he said. "If we don't open our eyes pretty soon, we're going to find ourselves without any friends."
http://www.savannahnow.com/stories/092805/3324156.shtml

Columnist Notes UI Pink Locker Room (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Sept. 29)
It's an old-school sports trick. By painting the visiting locker room in softer colors, the home team hopes to create a softer opponent. It is a mood setter. The idea is to make the other side more interested in Oprah's book club than fighting like gladiators on the gridiron. But that pink locker room at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football stadium has caused controversy on that campus. After a stadium makeover, the visitor's room also featured pink shower floors, pink metal lockers, pink carpeting, pink sinks, pink showers and pink urinals. According to the Associated Press: "Several professors and students joined the call Tuesday for the athletic department to do away with the pink showers, carpeting and lockers, a decades-long Hawkeye football tradition. Critics say the use of pink demeans women, perpetuates offensive stereotypes about women and homosexuality, and puts the university in the uncomfortable position of tacitly supporting those messages."
http://www.stltoday.com/blogs/sports-tipsheet/2005/09/thursdays-tipsheet-4/

Gaulding Calls For Eliminating Pink Locker Room (ESPN.com, Sept. 29)
The pink visitors' locker room at the University of Iowa's stadium is making some people see red. Several professors and students joined the call Tuesday for the athletic department to do away with the pink showers, carpeting and lockers, a decades-long Hawkeye football tradition. Critics say the use of pink demeans women, perpetuates offensive stereotypes about women and homosexuality, and puts the university in the uncomfortable position of tacitly supporting those messages. "I want the locker room gone," law school professor Jill Gaulding told a university committee studying the athletic department's compliance with NCAA standards, including gender equity. For decades, visiting football teams playing at Kinnick Stadium have dressed and showered in the pink locker room. The tradition was started by former Iowa coach Hayden Fry, a psychology major who said pink had a calming and passive effect on people. As part of the stadium's two-year, $88 million makeover, athletic officials took the former coach's interior decorating ideas to another level, splashing pink across the brick walls, shower floors and installing pink metal lockers, carpeting, sinks, showers and urinals. The controversy gained momentum and media attention last week when a visiting law school professor told reporters she had received death threats after voicing objections on her Web site. Versions of this Associated Press article appeared Sept. 28 and 29 on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, CHICAGO TRIBUNE, BALTIMORE SUN, INDIANAPOLIS STAR, DAYTON (Ohio) DAILY NEWS, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, COVERS in Canada, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, TALLAHASSEE.com, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, KANSAS CITY STAR, CNN/SI, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, ABC NEWS.com, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, MSNBC, LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD LEADER, THE STATE in South Carolina, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, NEW ORLEANS TIMES PICAYUNE, NEW YORK NEWSDAY, CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, GAINESVILLE (Fla.) SUN, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, and other media outlets.
http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/news/story?id=2174828

Alumna Wins Local Award (Arizona Republic, Sept. 29)
Greenberg Traurig Phoenix shareholder Pamela Overton has been recognized as a Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce ATHENA award finalist for the second year in a row. Her legal practice is concentrated on complex products liability litigation, business torts, breach of contract and condemnation. Overton received her J.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW in1983 and her B.S. degree from the University of Iowa in 1981.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/0929lawrail29.html

Choreographer Is Former IWP Participant (China Daily, Sept. 28)
Internationally known choreographer Lin Hwai-min- will lead the Cloud Gate Dance Theatre he founded to stage his work, "A Dream of Red Mansions", in November. The performances in Shanghai will be the final ones for the production, which was created in 1983 and has been performed some 50 times around the world. Lin was born in Taiwan in 1947 and first perceived his passion for dancing at the age of five when watching the film "The Red Shoes." While attending the International Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the United States, Lin sought out modern dance icon Martha Graham in New York and became a student in her school. Later he learned the classical court dances of Japan and Korea. Returning home, he established Cloud Gate in 1973.
http://app1.chinadaily.com.cn/star/2005/0922/pr13-1.htm

Gaulding Adds Voice To Pink Locker Room Debate (WPVI-TV, Sept. 28)
The pink visitors' locker room at the University of Iowa's stadium is making some people see red. Several professors and students joined the call Tuesday for the athletic department to do away with the pink showers, carpeting and lockers -- a decades-long Hawkeye football tradition. Critics say the use of pink demeans women, perpetuates offensive stereotypes about women and homosexuality, and puts the university in the uncomfortable position of tacitly supporting those messages. "I want the locker room gone," law school professor JILL GAULDING told a university committee studying the athletic department's compliance with NCAA standards, including gender equity. For decades, visiting football teams playing at Kinnick Stadium have dressed and showered in the pink locker room. Versions of the Associated Press article also ran on the Websites of WFAA-TV in Texas, WFMY NEWS 2 in North Carolina and other media outlets. 
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=bizarre&id=3484466

Alumna Serves On Thailand Broadcasting Commission (Bangkok Post, Sept. 28)
The paper profiles the seven members of the country's first National Broadcasting Commission, chosen by the Thai Senate. One member, Supatra Suparp, 67, has a bachelor's degree in public administration from Chulalongkorn University and in social work from Thammasat University, and a master's in political science from Chulalongkorn University and in social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She retired as an associate professor of political science at Chulalongkorn University in 1997. She has been a TV program co-host and a speaker on parliamentary radio programs and on army radio stations. The paper is based in Thailand.
http://www.bangkokpost.com/News/28Sep2005_news05.php

Van Allen Comments On Voyager 1 Milestone (Tech News World, Sept. 27)
Scientists have determined the spacecraft Voyager 1 passed through the termination shock and left the solar system on Dec. 16, 2004, at a distance of 8.74 billion miles from the sun. "The recent Voyager 1 observations of the termination shock are a major achievement in defining the physical properties of the solar system," says space science pioneer JAMES VAN ALLEN of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The publication is based in California.
http://www.technewsworld.com/story/46363.html

Van Allen Comments On Voyager 1 Milestone (USA Today, Sept. 27)
Scientists have determined the spacecraft Voyager 1 passed through the termination shock and left the solar system on Dec. 16, 2004, at a distance of 8.74 billion miles from the sun. "The recent Voyager 1 observations of the termination shock are a major achievement in defining the physical properties of the solar system," says space science pioneer JAMES VAN ALLEN of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The same story appeared on the Web site of KXTV-TV. http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2005-09-26-voyager-boundary_x.htm

Buzuvis Gets Death Threats For Pink Locker Room Comment (KFOX-TV, Sept. 27)
A University of Iowa law professor received death threats and abusive e-mail messages after she criticized the university for maintaining a tradition of painting the visiting locker room in the football stadium pink. The pink decor dates to the 1970s as part of a strategy of softening up football opponents. The Des Moines Register said that the threats -- apparently from Iowa football fans who admire the strategy -- started after ERIN BUZUVIS, a law professor, said "With a pink locker room, you're saying that 'You are a girlie man. You are weak, like a girl.' That implies that girls are non-dominant, therefore, lesser. And that is offensive." KFOX is based in El Paso, Texas. The same story appeared on the Web sites of KTVU (San Francisco), WMAQ (Chicago), WISN (Milwaukee), WBAL (Baltimore), WSB (Atlanta), WRAL (Raleigh) and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.kfoxtv.com/education/5021313/detail.html

Thorne Study Finds Dust Aggravates Asthma (Almendhar, Sept. 27)
Household dust can aggravate asthma, and new research findings suggest why: dust may contain poisons that are prime triggers for adult asthma and asthma-related symptoms. The poisons, or endotoxins, are produced by bacteria and released when they die. In the study, researchers led by PETER S. THORNE, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, examined dust samples from 831 households across the country, and determined the level of endotoxins they contained. At the same time, they interviewed 2,456 residents of the households about asthma symptoms and medicines. The study, published online in The American Journal of Respiratory and Clinical Care Medicine, found that endotoxins were highest in kitchens. But their effects on health were most evident in bedrooms, where people spend more time in close contact with them. The higher the concentration of endotoxins in the dust samples, the more likely the residents were to have asthma, to take asthma medicine and to suffer from wheezing and other symptoms, the researchers found. But this link held only for adults, not for children. Almendhar is based in Iraq.
http://www.almendhar.com/english_6495/news.aspx

Buzuvis Gets Threats For Pink Locker Room Comment (WMUR Channel, Sept. 26)
A University of Iowa law professor received death threats and abusive e-mail messages after she criticized the university for maintaining a tradition of painting the visiting locker room in the football stadium pink. The pink decor dates to the 1970s as part of a strategy of softening up football opponents. The Des Moines Register said that the threats -- apparently from Iowa football fans who admire the strategy -- started after ERIN BUZUVIS, a law professor, said "With a pink locker room, you're saying that 'You are a girlie man. You are weak, like a girl.' That implies that girls are non-dominant, therefore, lesser. And that is offensive." The station is based in New Hampshire. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of CHANNEL4000.COM in Minnesota, NBC11.COM in California and other media outlets.
http://www.thewmurchannel.com/education/5021313/detail.html

Alumni Win Triathlon (Kansas City Star, Sept. 26)
Tim Hola of Highlands Ranch, Colo., won the men's Ultramax U.S. Half Triathlon Championship at Smithville Lake, holding off two other Coloradoans in a winning time of 4:10:39.29. Hola, 30 led after posting a 25:17.60 time in the swim and never trailed. A.J. Johnson, 28, also of Highlands Ranch, came in second at 4:16:30.86. Brian Scott, 31, of Lakewood, Colo., was third in 4:17:12.14. Although Hola and Johnson have grown accustomed to the dry air of Colorado, both athletes know about Midwest humidity. Hola and Johnson grew up in Iowa and attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/sports/12741966.htm

Graduate Is Risk Management Director (Ft. Morgan Times, Sept. 26)
When Lynette Fischer moved to Fort Morgan, she knew it was the perfect place for her and her family to settle down. Fischer was recently hired as the new Fort Morgan director of risk management. After getting her masters degree in human relations from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 12 years ago, Fischer has come a long way in getting where she needs and wants to be. "It has been a great job so far and everyone that works here has been extremely helpful," Fischer said. "I have received many phone calls from people around town offering me their assistance." The Times is based in Ft. Morgan, Colo.
http://www.fortmorgantimes.com/Stories/0,1413,164~8312~3071244,00.html

Buzuvis Criticizes Pink Locker Rooms, Receives Threats (Chronicle, Sept. 26)
A law professor at the University of Iowa says she has received death threats after complaining to a local television reporter that pink locker rooms at the university's football stadium were offensive and demeaning to women. The professor, whose research interests include gender equity in sports, plans to bring up her concerns on Tuesday at a campus meeting. ERIN BUZUVIS explained her criticism of the pink locker rooms last Thursday on her blog, Buzwords. She noted that the tradition of painting the visiting team's facilities pink originated with a former Iowa coach, Hayden Fry, who apparently was seeking to psychologically discomfit the opposing teams. She cited his autobiography as saying that he had chosen the color because "pink is often found in girls' bedrooms, and because of that some consider it a sissy color." The professor, who holds an adjunct appointment, noted on her blog that, as part of a recent renovation, the university had updated the locker room by installing pink lockers, pink urinals, and pink sinks. (At the time, a university athletics official described the color as not pink but "dusty rose," according to an article in The Des Moines Register.) In her blog, Ms. Buzuvis called the installation "sexist and homophobic" because the message behind using pink is to say to opponents, "You are weak like a girl" or "weak like a gay man."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2005/09/2005092607n.htm

Buzuvis Threatened After Posting On Blog (Inside Higher Ed, Sept. 26)
A University of Iowa law professor received death threats and abusive e-mail messages after she criticized the university for maintaining a tradition of painting the visiting locker room in the football stadium pink, The Des Monies Register reported. The pink decor dates to the 1970s as part of a strategy of softening up football opponents. The Register said that the threats - apparently from Iowa football fans who admire the strategy - started after ERIN BUZUVIS, a law professor, told a local reporter: "With a pink locker room, you're saying that 'You are a girlie man. You are weak, like a girl.' That implies that girls are non-dominant, therefore, lesser. And that is offensive."

Kerber Comments On History Faculty Report (Inside Higher Ed, Sept. 26)
Recent decades have opened up history faculties so that they include more female and minority scholars. But a new report released by the American Historical Association says that in key respects history departments are becoming "less diverse." Top doctoral programs are admitting Ph.D. students from a narrow group of mostly private institutions and top departments are in turn hiring from a narrow range of institutions, the report says. The preference of elite institutions to admit graduate students from other elite institutions is, of course, nothing new. But the history report says the discipline - having become more egalitarian - is now shifting back with regard to its mix of public and private graduates. In an e-mail interview, LINDA K. KERBER, chair of the history department at the University of Iowa and president-elect of the AHA, said of the findings: "The results sadden me. The narrowing of the range of the background of the next generation of professional historians serves our profession poorly." Kerber said that she feared an impact on the field. "Increased caution and less risk taking in admissions deprives us of late bloomers and of students who come to the academy by unusual paths. In my experience, some of the most exciting dissertations, the work that claims new territory, have been written by people who bring fresh perspectives."

Kutcher, Onetime UI Student, Weds Moore (Rugged Elegant Living, Sept. 25)
A story reporting that actors Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher wed Saturday in Beverly Hills says that while studying biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (with hopes of helping people with cardiomyopathy, the disorder his brother suffered from), Kutcher won a modeling contest and moved to New York. Within months he was walking the runway in Milan and Paris, for Versace, Calvin Klein, and Tommy Hilfiger. The Website is dedicated to news, prose, photos and advice that inspire "healthy, adventuresome and soulful living."
http://www.ruggedelegantliving.com/a/003757.html

Bechara: 'Psychopaths' Good Investors (Houston Chronicle, Sept. 25)
"Functional psychopaths" make the best investment decisions because they can't experience emotions such as fear, a study says. Fear stops most people from taking even logical risks - meaning those who have suffered damage to areas of the brain affecting emotions, and can suppress feelings, make better decisions, according to the report. The ability to control emotion helps performance in business and the financial markets, the researchers found. "Many CEOs and many top lawyers might also share this trait," said ANTOINE BECHARA, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. The study was carried out by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Iowa.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/business/mym/3369311

Andrejevic Comments On Placement (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Sept. 25)
A story about product placement, the widespread practice of inserting actual products in movies and TV shows as the result of some fiduciary arrangement with the manufacturer of those products, says the line between ads and programming is blurring. "The days of ads separate from content are numbered," says MARK ANDREJEVIC, assistant professor in the department of communications at the University of Iowa. "When we all have digital cable, we'll also have digital recording technology that will make ad skipping ridiculously easy and hassle-free. Except, by then, advertising will be seamlessly integrated with content. We are currently in the transition phase as advertisers work out the best way to do this." The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/12738914.htm

Cuban Artist Who Died Mysteriously Attended UI (Miami Herald, Sept. 25)
In 1985, Ana Mendieta -- sculptor, performance artist, Cuban refugee child, American feminist, embattled wife -- was at the crest of her career. When in September of that year she plunged 34 stories to her death from the Greenwich Village apartment she shared with her famous artist husband, minimalist sculptor Carl Andre, Mendieta became the protagonist of one of the art world's most confounding mysteries. Was Mendieta's fall the last performance of a brash, passionate woman who used her naked body as the medium for her art, or was she murdered by her equally volatile husband? Twenty years later, there are still no answers about Mendieta's tragic end, for which Andre was tried and acquitted. But a retrospective of Mendieta's work, exhibited at the Whitney in New York, the Hirshhorn in Washington D.C. and opening at the Miami Art Museum on Oct. 2 -- Ana Mendieta: Earth Body, Sculpture and Performance 1972-1985 -- is securing a significant place in the history of contemporary art for the often misunderstood artist. After being placed in foster care in Dubuque, Mendieta landed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which had one of the most innovative art programs in the country, and it was there she met in 1969 Hans Breder, a German artist and professor who became her lover, artistic ally and mentor for 10 years. After graduating with a Master of Fine Arts degree from Iowa and winning a National Endowment for the Arts grant in the New Genre category, she moved to New York in 1978 and joined the A.I.R. Gallery, a collective of feminist artists.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/living/12730168.htm

Woodworking Artisan Attended UI (Santa Cruz Sentinel, Sept. 25)
A story about artisan woodworker Steven Schloemer says he grew up in Iowa and apprenticed as a carpenter in high school. He studied fine art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then did his graduate work in drawing and painting at Stanford University. The paper is based in California.
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archive/2005/September/25/biz/stories/01biz.htm

'Nancy Drew' Ghostwriter Was Notable UI Alumna (New York Times, Sept. 25)
A review of Melanie Rehak's new book, "Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her,"  says that one of the Nancy Drew series' ghostwriters was Mildred Augustine - she was eventually, after two marriages, called Mildred Wirt Benson - to whom the series creator, Edward Stratemeyer,  originally assigned the Nancy Drew books. He invented the girl detective after his Hardy Boys series became a hit in 1927. In a 1929 letter to Grosset & Dunlap, the publisher he hoped would publish his new series, he described Benson, who had been writing for him for four years, as "a young western woman (newspaper woman)." The description was apt. In 1929, Benson was 24, had lived in Iowa her whole life and was the first woman to receive a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She was paid $125 for each book, and worked from Stratemeyer's outlines. Rehak writes that their endeavor "produced a fantasy girl with a few touches of the real," and that Benson added "some of Nancy's bolder moves and snappier dialogue to Stratemeyer's outline."
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/25/books/review/25aurthur.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1127745070-woJ9bUI4mUstO0ELQagdog

UI Professor Comments On Workplace Gossip (Montgomery Advertiser, Sept. 23)
A recent study shows how prevalent rumors and gossip are in the workplace. Sixty-three percent of American employees said rumors are usually how they first hear about important business matters, according to a study by ISR, a global employee research and consulting firm headquartered in Chicago. JAY CHRISTENSEN-SZALANSKI, a professor in the department of management and organization at the University of Iowa, explained that psychologists make a distinction between what qualifies as "rumor" and "gossip." Rumors, he said, are usually started by individuals to help them relieve anxiety in a specific situation. Gossip, on the other hand, always concerns people, and often makes a moral judgment on someone's character. Christensen-Szalanski emphatically believes the problems that gossip creates in the workplace far outweigh any benefits. "I cannot see any beneficial reason to advocate the use of gossip in business," he said. He also takes issue with people who argue that gossip is just "natural." "Tooth decay is natural," he said, "but you don't let it proceed." The newspaper is based in Alabama.
http://www.accessmontgomery.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050923/BUSINESS/509230332/1003

Writers' Workshop Student Wins Contest (Wisconsin State Journal, Sept. 23)
Kevin A. Gonzalez won Playboy magazine's annual College Fiction Contest this year. His story, "Statehood," about a 12-year-old Puerto Rican boy and his dad, is printed in the October issue and he won $3,000. Gonzalez was raised in Puerto Rico, got his MFA in poetry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is now a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The newspaper is based in Madison, Wis. http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/forum/index.php?ntid=55146&ntpid=0

University Of Maine President Installed (Portland Press Herald, Sept. 23
Robert Kennedy will be installed today in Orono as the 18th president of the University of Maine. He held posts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Washington State University, Ohio State University, the University of Maryland and Texas A&M before being hired as provost, the second-in-command at Maine, in 2000. The newspaper is based in Maine. http://pressherald.mainetoday.com/news/state/050923umaine.shtml

Buzuvis Challenges Pink Locker Rooms (WQAD-TV, Sept. 23)
A University of Iowa law professor says the school is promoting homophobia and will challenge whether Iowa is violating NCAA rules by painting a visitors' locker room pink. ERIN BUZUVIS moved to Iowa from Boston in the fall and discovered the visiting team's locker room at Kinnick Stadium was pink -- something she says promotes sexism and homophobia. But officials with the school's sports department say they won't change the pink walls -- which is a long-time facet in Kinnick Stadium. The color was introduced decades ago by former Hawkeye coach Hayden Fry to soften opponents. But recent stadium renovations added more pink items to the locker room, including lockers, sinks and urinals. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3889083&nav=1sW7

Schnoor: Gulf Coast Floods Not Yet Health Risk (WINK-TV Sept. 23)
As the floodwater recedes in New Orleans, scientists are testing it and the mud it leaves behind to answer a big question: Is the Big Easy on its way to becoming the Big Risky? The answers aren't all in yet, but many experts are optimistic that most of New Orleans could be safely resettled in a few months. The hard data scientists need to gauge the long-term risks are still emerging. Preliminary testing of sediment samples has found some places with elevated levels of compounds like diesel and fuel oil, some of which might stick around in the environment for years. But the detected amounts of hazardous metals like lead were too low to suggest a health risk, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Friday. The agency stressed that the initial results, from 18 samples, represent just the beginning of the sampling program and may not be typical of all sediment in the area. "I would not foresee a long-term risk based on this report," said JERALD SCHNOOR, professor in the environmental engineering department at the University of Iowa. The TV station is based in Florida. http://www.winktv.com/x466.xml?URL=http://localhost/APWIREFEED/d8co5kfg0.xml

Dancer Attended UI (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Sept. 23)
DanceCleveland will present the Limon Dance Company Saturday night at the State Theatre in Playhouse Square. Co-sponsored by Cuyahoga Community College, the concert will feature Jose Limon's signature work, "The Moor's Pavane," and a preview of Lar Lubovitch's "Recordare" ("Remember"). Lubovitch, 62, first saw a performance by the Limon company when he was a student majoring in art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A Chicago native, he had no dance training, nor had he ever seen a dance company. But Limon's performance of "The Moor's Pavane" was so powerful that Lubovitch instantly made the decision to become a dancer. http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1127468508142981.xml&coll=2

UI Press Poetry Book Featured (National Public Radio, Sept. 22)
Housework is a chore for many, and a pleasure for some. Poet Faith Shearin's mother sees it as the former. "My mother despises what can never truly be done," Shearin writes in the book Sweeping Beauty. "So she does not care for cooking or cleaning." Love it or loath it, domestic work is a common experience and it's celebrated in Sweeping Beauty: Contemporary Women Poets Do Housework, edited by Pamela Gemin, published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4793976

Food Studies Books Noted (Philadelphia Enquirer, Sept. 22)
Food studies are finally gaining respect as a subject of historical significance, worthy of academic consumption. Author Sherrie Inness, who teaches English and women's studies at Miami University of Ohio, is the author of "Dinner Roles: American Women and Culinary Culture" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2001) and the forthcoming "Secret Ingredients: Race, Gender and Class at the Dinner Table" (University of Iowa Press). Scholars, she says, "are rethinking women's roles and creating a history that is about more than the food itself, but about gender issues." http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/living/food/12706722.htm

Kohatsu Questions 'Storefront' Obesity Clinics (New York Times, Sept. 22)
As obesity becomes an increasingly intractable national problem and more people seek medical solutions, diet doctors represent a growing segment of the country's $46 billion diet market, according to Marketdata Enterprises, a market research firm in Tampa, Fla. Virtually ignored by medical schools and residency programs, medical weight loss has no specific entry requirements and no recognized certification board. But the field, which recently gained a delegate seat at American Medical Association meetings, does seem to have more than its share of complaints leveled at doctors who sell products to their patients, whether special food, liquid diets, unproven therapies or potentially dangerous and habit-forming weight-loss drugs. Because insurance plans typically do not cover nonsurgical treatments, patients generally pay cash to their diet doctors. "The problem is that some of them are in the entrepreneurial, cash-up-front storefront obesity clinic, as opposed to practicing real evidence-based medicine," said Dr. NEAL KOHATSU, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa who has studied physician disciplinary records.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/22/fashion/thursdaystyles/22diet.html

Fisher Comments On 'GO Zone' Tax Breaks (BusinessWeek, Sept. 22)
A week after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, President Bush outlined the most ambitious and potentially costly domestic initiative since President Lyndon B. Johnson's War on Poverty. The Gulf reconstruction plan is a huge gamble for a president scrambling to recover from his Administration's chaotic response to the disaster. Bush's vision of stimulating business investment to lift thousands out of poverty is something of a conservative New Deal, a radically rethought version of Big Government that bends its spending to conservative goals: lower taxes, less regulation, more local control and bootstrap capitalism. Bush's other ideas, though, may go down a little easier with Dems. Take the plan for a "Gulf Opportunity (GO) Zone." It builds on the concept of tax-favored enterprise zones, which try to entice businesses to invest in depressed areas by offering preferential rates on local property levies and state corporate taxes. Bush is proposing the largest enterprise zone ever -- covering swaths of three states -- and the first to offer relief from federal taxes. But relief from the federal corporate tax, now at 35 percent, offers a bigger incentive than local tax breaks provide. What's more, the GO Zone is designed mainly to bring companies back to their old locations -- "an efficient way to help subsidize rebuilding through the tax code," says PETER FISHER, professor of urban planning at the University of Iowa.
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/sep2005/nf20050922_2242_db016.htm

Writer's UI Daughter Prefers Phone (Lawrence World Journal, Sept. 22)
A columnist writes about his efforts to stay in touch with his college-age children, including a daughter who is a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA , without running up massive cell phone bills. He likes iChat, which he describes as "like instant messaging, only on steroids. Not only does it have text instant messaging, but also audio if you have a microphone and speakers." But his daughter says it's not worth the effort and prefers to pick up the phone.
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2005/sep/22/callers_using_internet_keep_touch/?business

Bechara: CEOs, Lawyers Share Trait (The Royal Gazette, Sept. 22)
"Functional psychopaths" make the best investment decisions because they can't experience emotions such as fear, a study by researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Business showed. Fear stops people from taking even logical risks, meaning those who have suffered damage to areas of the brain affecting emotions, and can suppress feeling, make better decisions, the report showed. The ability to control emotion helps performance in business and the financial markets, the researchers found. "Many CEOs and many top lawyers might also share this trait," ANTOINE BECHARA, a professor of neurology of the University of Iowa, said in a statement on the Stanford Graduate School of Business Web site. The study was carried out by Stanford, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in Bermuda.
http://www.theroyalgazette.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050921/BUSINESS/109210112

UI Alumnus Writes On 'Knowledge Gap' (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 21)
For most Americans, a mandatory high school or college introductory course constitutes the extent of their economic training. However, though we may choose to leave economics alone after we have left the classroom, economic forces don't stop exerting a powerful influence on our daily lives. The Wall Street Journal Online asked bloggers Russell Roberts, a professor of economics at George Mason University, and William Polley, an economics professor at Western Illinois University, to discuss what the public doesn't know about economics, and whether and how that knowledge gap might hurt. Polley earned his doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1999.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112730197267947236,00.html

Thorne: Dust Aggravates Asthma (International Herald Tribune, Sept. 21)
Household dust can aggravate asthma, and new research findings suggest why: dust may contain poisons that are prime triggers for adult asthma and asthma-related symptoms. The poisons, or endotoxins, are produced by bacteria and released when they die. In the study, researchers led by PETER S. THORNE, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, examined dust samples from 831 households across the country, and determined the level of endotoxins they contained. At the same time, they interviewed 2,456 residents of the households about asthma symptoms and medicines. The study, published online in The American Journal of Respiratory and Clinical Care Medicine, found that endotoxins were highest in kitchens. But their effects on health were most evident in bedrooms, where people spend more time in close contact with them.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/09/21/healthscience/snvital.php

Schnoor: Gulf Coast Floods Not Yet Health Risk (Tri-Valley Herald, Sept. 21)
As the floodwater recedes in New Orleans, scientists are testing it and the mud it leaves behind to answer a big question: Is the Big Easy on its way to becoming the Big Risky? The answers aren't all in yet, but many experts are optimistic that most of New Orleans could be safely resettled in a few months. The search for hazardous chemical contamination in the water and flood sediment are part of the larger question of what the long-term environmental impact of Hurricane Katrina will be across the broad region it struck. The hard data scientists need to gauge the long-term risks are still emerging. Preliminary testing of sediment samples has found some places with elevated levels of compounds like diesel and fuel oil, some of which might stick around in the environment for years. But the detected amounts of hazardous metals like lead were too low to suggest a health risk, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Friday. The agency stressed that the initial results, from 18 samples, represent just the beginning of the sampling program and may not be typical of all sediment in the area. "I would not foresee a long-term risk based on this report," said JERALD SCHNOOR, professor in the environmental engineering department at the University of Iowa. The newspaper is based in California. Versions of this story also appeared Sept. 21 on the Web sites of THE ARGUS in California, EVERETT (Wash.) HERALD, and NEWARK (N.J.) STAR-LEDGER.
http://www.insidebayarea.com/trivalleyherald/news/ci_3048768

UI Grad Is Hospital's First Anesthesiologist (Monticello Times, Sept. 21)
Monticello Big-Lake Hospital had just unveiled its new 50,000 square foot west wing expansion, adding a wound care center, its first anesthesiologist and making significant strides in its sleep center over the course of the summer. While the hospital added its west wing expansion last summer, it added a key component to that sector this summer by hiring its first full-time anesthesiologist -- Dr. Brian Rupert -- July 5. "The facilities here are probably the nicest that I've worked at," said Rupert, who went to medical school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and received his anesthesia residency at the University of Minnesota. "Most of the operating rooms that you'll find in the Twin Cities area are not new. They've really done a wonderful job here." The newspaper is based in Minnesota.
http://www.monticellotimes.com/main.asp?SectionID=10&SubSectionID=76&ArticleID=12474&TM=50951.87

Schnoor Comments On New Orleans Health Risks (CNN, Sept. 21)
As the floodwater recedes in New Orleans, scientists are testing it and the mud it leaves behind to answer a big question: Is the Big Easy on its way to becoming the Big Risky? The answers aren't all in yet, but many experts are optimistic that most of New Orleans could be safely resettled in a few months. The search for hazardous chemical contamination in the water and flood sediment are part of the larger question of what the long-term environmental impact of Hurricane Katrina will be across the broad region it struck. The hard data scientists need to gauge the long-term risks are still emerging. The detected amounts of hazardous metals like lead were too low to suggest a health risk, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Friday. The agency stressed that the initial results, from 18 samples, represent just the beginning of the sampling program and may not be typical of all sediment in the area. "I would not foresee a long-term risk based on this report," said JERALD SCHNOOR, professor in the environmental engineering department at the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Newark, N.J. A version of the story also ran on the Website TALLAHASSEE.COM, based in Florida, the MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH and the NEWARK (N.J.) STAR LEDGER.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-2/11273013369730.xml&coll=1

Bechara: Best Investors Are Psychopaths (China Daily, Sept. 21)
A team of scientists has found the emotionally impaired are more willing to gamble for high stakes and that people with brain damage may make good financial decisions. In a study of investors' behavior 41 people with normal IQs were asked to play a simple investment game. Fifteen of the group had suffered lesions on the areas of the brain that affect emotions. The result was those with brain damage outperformed those without. The scientists found emotions led some of the group to avoid risks even when the potential benefits far outweighed the losses, a phenomenon known as myopic loss aversion. One of the researchers, ANTIONE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, said the best stock market investors might plausibly be called "functional psychopaths."
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2005-09/21/content_479731.htm

UI's Whitt Gives Keynote At Oregon Event (Corvallis Gazette-Times, Sept. 21)
At University Day 2005, Oregon State University faculty and staff gathered to celebrate the past year's accomplishments and discuss ways to enhance student success in the future. To kick off the academic year, OSU employees gathered Tuesday in Austin Auditorium for a presentation by ELIZABETH WHITT, keynote speaker and professor in the division of counseling, rehabilitation and student development at the University of Iowa. The University Day schedule also included an orientation for new hires, then a luncheon, tours of Reser Stadium and professional development and community building sessions. The paper is based in Oregon.
http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2005/09/21/news/community/wedloc01.txt

Lynch Comments On Cancer Treatments (Austin American-Statesman, Sept. 21)
The ever-improving treatments that are successfully helping cancer patients are also increasing the risk they will live long enough to develop second cancers, a study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute indicates. The finding shows the need to develop effective cancer treatments that do less long-range damage, raising the possibility of a second cancer, said Dr. CHARLES F. LYNCH, professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa, and a member of the research team. Cancer therapists are starting to meet that need, he said. The paper is based in Texas. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the ATLANTA (Ga.) JOURNAL CONSTITUTION.
http://www.statesman.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/-tst/528076.html

Lynch: New Treatments Reduce Cancer Recurrence (FoxNews, Sept. 20)
While testicular cancer cure rates rank high, new research shows that successfully treated patients aren't necessarily out of the woods. In the largest and longest follow-up study of men treated for testicular cancer ever published, survivors were found to have an increased risk for developing malignant tumors in other parts of their bodies for at least 35 years after treatment. It was not clear from the study how big a role treatment played in emergence of these other cancers. Although radiation treatment doses have been decreased, bladder, stomach and pancreatic cancers have been associated with radiation treatment in past studies. The authors say given the modification in treatment that results in lower radiation doses these solid tumors will probably have less of an impact on the lives of testicular cancer survivors. Careful follow-up is needed in these men to quantify long-term risk. Researchers say that treatment probably explains most of the increased secondary cancer risk. "It appears that the risks are somewhat lower with the treatments we are giving today than they were with conventional therapies from a few decades ago," said study co-author CHARLES F. LYNCH, MD, PhD, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. "We don't have the long-term follow-up to know for sure. We probably need to wait for some more time to pass to understand the risks associated with the newer treatments."
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,169962,00.html

Lutz Suggests Intelligent Design Additions (Concord Monitor, Sept. 20)
In a satirical op-ed piece, TOM LUTZ, professor of English at the University of Iowa, suggests supplementing the teaching of Intelligent Design theory with ideas from Ghanain or Nigerian mythology, and also announces his intention to develop a new alternate creation theory, Malevolent Design. The Monitor is in New Hampshire.
http://www.cmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050920/REPOSITORY/509200315/1028/OPINION02

Bechara: Best Investors Are Psychopaths (Financial Times, Sept. 20)
A team of scientists has found the emotionally impaired are more willing to gamble for high stakes and that people with brain damage may make good financial decisions. In a study of investors' behavior 41 people with normal IQs were asked to play a simple investment game. Fifteen of the group had suffered lesions on the areas of the brain that affect emotions. The result was those with brain damage outperformed those without. The scientists found emotions led some of the group to avoid risks even when the potential benefits far outweighed the losses, a phenomenon known as myopic loss aversion. One of the researchers, ANTIONE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, said the best stock market investors might plausibly be called "functional psychopaths." The Financial Times is based in India. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the ARIZONA REPUBLIC, NEW YORK SUN, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE REVIEW,  SIFY (INDIA), BRISBANE COURIER MAIL (Australia), THE AUSTRALIAN, REUTERS, MSNBC and THE AGE (Australia).
http://www.financialexpress.com/latest_full_story.php?content_id=103093

Thorne Study Finds Dust Aggravates Asthma (New York Times, Sept. 20)
Household dust can aggravate asthma, and new research findings suggest why: dust may contain poisons that are prime triggers for adult asthma and asthma-related symptoms. The poisons, or endotoxins, are produced by bacteria and released when they die. In the study, researchers led by PETER S. THORNE, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, examined dust samples from 831 households across the country, and determined the level of endotoxins they contained. At the same time, they interviewed 2,456 residents of the households about asthma symptoms and medicines. The study, published online in The American Journal of Respiratory and Clinical Care Medicine, found that endotoxins were highest in kitchens. But their effects on health were most evident in bedrooms, where people spend more time in close contact with them.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/20/health/20haza.html

UI-Developed Mars Craft Begins Collecting Data (Sept. 20, Mars Today)
Following completion of its deployment on June 17, MARSIS, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding onboard the ESA Mars Express spacecraft, has started collecting scientific data from the surface, the subsurface and the ionosphere of Mars. The major scientific goals of this ground penetrating radar experiment are to characterize the subsurface layers of sediments and possibly detect and map underground water or ice, to characterize the radar properties of the surface and to provide data on the planet's ionosphere. The MARSIS instrument was developed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA in partnership with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The same story appeared on the Web site of SPACE REF.
http://www.marstoday.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=17845

UI Study Shows Hog Lot Environmental Damage (WQAD TV, Sept. 20)
Iowa's 12 billion dollar hog industry accounts for 63,000 jobs. But residents say the new hog lots are causing nausea, depression, headaches, diarrhea and other problems. A study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA estimates that hog confinements release more than 100 chemicals. Some of the hog manure used for fertilizer is leaking into streams and lakes, killing fish and making swimming areas unsafe. WQAD is based in Moline.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3867279&nav=1sW7

UI Graduate Owns Chain Of Map Stores (St. Petersburg Times, Sept. 20)
A profile of Gene Ingle, owner of a chain of map stores called MAPSource, says he is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sptimes.com/2005/09/20/Business/Storms_chart_new_dire.shtml

Study: Emotions Hinder Traders (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 19)
Successful stock trading requires smarts, but a new study suggests that brain damage might help, too. According to a study conducted by researchers from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, people with brain impairments that suppress emotions might be the best suited to play the market, the Times of London reported. The researchers set up a simple gambling game that pitted people with normal emotions against the emotionally impaired.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112715746829845204,00.html

Bechara: Link Between Brain Damage, Investment Savvy (CNN Money, Sept. 19)
A team of U.S. scientists has found the emotionally impaired are more willing to gamble for high stakes and that people with brain damage may make good financial decisions, the London Times newspaper reported on Monday. In a study of investors' behavior 41 people with normal IQs were asked to play a simple investment game. Fifteen of the group had suffered lesions on the areas of the brain that affect emotions. The result was those with brain damage outperformed those without. One of the researchers, ANTOINE BECHARA, an associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, said the best stock market investors might plausibly be called "functional psychopaths." Fellow author, Baba Shiv of Stanford Graduate School of Business said many company chiefs and top lawyers may also show they share the same trait. "Emotions serve an adaptive role in speeding up the decision-making process," said Shiv. "However, there are circumstances in which a naturally occurring emotional response must be inhibited, so that a deliberate and potentially wiser decision can be made." The study, published in June in the journal Psychological Science, was conducted by a team of researchers from Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon University, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of KHALEEJ TIMES in the United Arab Emirates, LEADING THE CHARGE in Australia and on the REUTERS news wire service.
http://money.cnn.com/2005/09/19/news/international/psychopaths.reut/

Bechara: 'Functional Psychopaths' Take More Risks (Bloomberg.com, Sept. 19)
"Functional psychopaths'' make the best investment decisions because they can't experience emotions such as fear, a study by researchers at Stanford Graduate School of Business showed. Fear stops people from taking even logical risks, meaning those who have suffered damage to areas of the brain affecting emotions, and can suppress feeling, make better decisions, the report showed. The ability to control emotion helps performance in business and the financial markets, the researchers found. "Many CEOs and many top lawyers might also share this trait,'' ANTOINE BECHARA, a professor of neurology of the University of Iowa, said in a statement on the Stanford Graduate School of Business Web site. The study was carried out by Stanford, Carnegie Mellon University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000102&sid=a.eCGz4Nscks&refer=uk

Schroeder Comments On Pottery Dig (KTOV-TV, Sept. 19)
A story filed from Bonaparte, Iowa, reports that there's a piece of Iowa's history literally buried in one Southeast Iowa couple's backyard. The Bonaparte Pottery was built in 1865 by Parker and Hanback. Fire destroyed the pottery in November 1875 but it was rebuilt in March 1876. The site produced jars, pots, and crocks until 1896 when it was sold to a lumber company. That company closed in 1986 and the property sat vacant and deteriorating until Marilyn and Don Thomas came along in 1993. After surviving the floods a state official who dug jars out of the site in 1986 turned the pottery in for an historic place. In 1994 and 1995 the University of Iowa came and discovered the foundation of a kiln and the remains of a horse powered pug mill in the basement. Each year the university does field digs at the Thomas's. One person from the original digs in '94 and '95 is back this weekend to hopefully uncover more answers. MARIA SCHROEDER with the University of Iowa is working below steps where the Thomas's found some bricks. Schroeder thinks she's digging out a wall fall or she's uncovering part of another kiln. The station is based in Missouri.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=3865873&nav=1LFs

'Nancy Drew' Author Graduated From UI Journalism Program (Salon, Sept. 19)
An interview with Melanie Rehak, author of "Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her," says that the series purported "author" - Carolyn Keene -- was actually several women writers. Nancy herself was conceived by Edward Stratemeyer, the children's publishing titan of the early 20th century.

In 1926, Stratemeyer hired Mildred Wirt Benson, a hard-charging newspaperwoman from Iowa and recent college graduate to anonymously pen children's books; she was responsible for the first Nancy Drew novel, "The Secret of the Old Clock," and several mysteries that came afterward. Other writers followed Benson's suit and continued the popular line of Nancy Drew mysteries. But when Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, Stratemeyer's oldest daughter, took over his company after her father's death in 1930, she created many of the plots and story lines of the Nancy stories, and in later years took over as the main author of the series. As Benson -- the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- testified during a highly publicized 1980 court trial to determine copyright status and ownership of Nancy Drew, "I was probably a rough and tumble newspaper person who had to earn a living, and I was out in the world. That was my type of Nancy. Nancy was making her way in life." (Benson worked as a newspaper reporter for more than 50 years and, after being widowed a second time, took to piloting planes to Central America for solo archaeological explorations.)
http://www.salon.com/books/review/2005/09/19/rehak/

Lewis-Beck Developed German Election Model (MSN Money, Sept. 18)
Germany's government was heading toward a grand coalition, according to the first exit polls on Sunday. Angela Merkel's opposition centre-right Christian Democratic Union was leading with 36 percent, but the CDU and its allies are projected to lack enough votes to form a parliamentary majority. Chancellor Gerhard Schröder's Social Democratic party has garnered 34 percent, according to Forsa, a polling agency, while the Green party, which currently is the SPD's junior government partner, won 8.5 percent. The liberal Free Democratic party is projected to win 10.6 per cent, while the Left party, made up of former communists and disenchanted SDP members, garnered 8.6. A long-term model developed by Bruno Jerôme and Véronique Jerôme-Speziaria, two economists from Metz University in France, and MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, political scientist at the University of Iowa, based on correlations between economic statistics and voting behaviors, concluded that the outgoing coalition would gain 45.3 per cent of the votes, much more than estimated by opinion polls though not enough to regain a majority.
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.asp?feed=FT&Date=20050918&ID=5120726

Workshop Author Got UI Immunology Degree, MFA (San Jose Mercury News, Sept. 18)
A columnist advises readers to get to know Yiyun Li. "I think you'll be hearing a lot more about her." An Oakland resident who teaches writing courses at Mills College, Li was born in China in 1973. She came to the United States in 1996 and earned a master's degree in immunology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. To improve her English she took a writing course and turned out to be so good at it that it changed her life. She wound up with a master of fine arts degree in fiction writing from the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and another MFA from the University of Iowa in creative non-fiction. Her stories have been published in the New Yorker and the Paris Review, and she won the Plimpton Prize for New Writers in 2004. he 10 stories in her debut collection, "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers," deal with the way the lives of ordinary people -- from children to old-age pensioners, from peasants in small villages to hip exiles in America -- have been shaped by the tumult of Chinese history. A version of the story also ran on the Website of the PHILDELPHIA INQUIRER.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/books/12678271.htm

Rumor Has Eagles' 'TO' Engaged To UI Alumna (Philadelphia Inquirer, Sept. 18)
Buzz in Eagles circles points to major postseason plans for wide receiver Terrell Owens, besides playing in the Super Bowl: Walking down the aisle next year with his girlfriend of a year, Felisha Terrell, 26, an Illinois-born, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA-educated former pharmaceutical saleswoman. Lately, she's been modeling with Ford. Buttonholed outside Owens' 31st birthday party here last December, Terrell chuckled at a suggestion that the couple's engagement announcement someday might be headlined "Felisha Terrell-Terrell Owens." Owens' publicist would not comment.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/local/12672828.htm

Artist Feature Mentions Former UI Professor (Maine Today, Sept. 18)
Tom Paiement delved into his latest series of paintings after visiting McCabe's Guitar Shop in Santa Monica, Calif. At the back of the store, a man played the same several notes on a guitar, each distinct in tone and texture. For 20 minutes or so, Paiement was transfixed. Later, he dreamed about the succinct tonality of the notes. Two years later, Paiement prepares to exhibit a series of paintings inspired by that chance episode in California. A guitar freak, Paiement has produced more than 60 abstract oil paintings that suggest the physical aspect of music. He will display some of the paintings beginning Oct. 6 at Greenhut Galleries in Portland. Paiement's unusual course to become an artist involved his meeting with Mauricio Lasansky, who was on the faculty of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. Paiement admired his work from afar. Paiement, after moving to Maine, called Lasansky on the phone and began talking to him about his art. At first, Lasansky wasn't interested in conversations with the young stranger from Maine, but Paiement persisted. Eventually, Lasansky invited Paiement to come for a visit.
http://entertainment.mainetoday.com/news/050918artspaiement.shtml

Author Morrell Taught At UI (News Tribune, Sept. 18)
A story about author David Morrell's new novel, "Creepers," says Morrell taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Washington State.
http://www.thenewstribune.com/ae/story/5188127p-4716448c.html

Law Alumnus Starts Biomedical Business In China (St. Petersburg Times, Sept. 18)
The two Chens, Justin and Yiyou, found a compelling reason to return to China after more than a dozen years of studying and working in the United States: a $2-million investment in their biomedical startup. The Chens, who were roommates at Peking University but are not related, founded Starvax Inc. in the United States in 2003, drawing on Yiyou's expertise in biochemistry and Justin's in intellectual property law. At the time, both were living in northern California after having completed postgraduate work at U.S. colleges. Then Bright Oceans Group, a large Chinese communications company, offered the two men seed money. But it came with a hook: The Chens had to come home. Justin Chen, Starvax's 35-year-old chief executive, said the move was a no-brainer. "To start a biotech company in the U.S. with $2-million is almost impossible," said Justin, a native of Shandong Province, south of Beijing. "Here, we've been able to make it last for nearly two years." Justin received his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com/2005/09/18/China/China_s_lure__and_its.shtml

Blum Quoted On Seasonal Affective Disorder (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Sept. 17)
A story about seasonal affective disorder says that NANCEE BLUM, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, asks people who believe the shorter, cooler days of fall and winter are causing their depression about other possible explanations for their blues. "It could be the construction worker knowing he's going to get laid off over winter, or someone whose allergies flare up in late August, early September," Blum said. Generally speaking, though, she said that cooler weather does make people feel energized. And if you always liked school, the calendar prompts delight in us just as the din put the wag in Pavlov's dogs. Likewise, if you've been waiting to shoo the kids off to school, this may be your favorite time of year.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/5618824.html

Regents Schools To Vary Tuition  (WQAD-TV, Sept. 16)
Iowa's three state universities are moving toward setting tuition rates that vary by school -- a sharp change from the standardized charges now in effect. Meeting in Cedar Falls today, the state Board of Regents voted unanimously to direct its tuition task force to study the matter and make a recommendation. Currently, undergraduate in-state tuition is the same at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. Board members say they want to give students more choice and base tuition on what it costs to educate a student. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3857194

UI Student Auditions For 'American Idol' (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 16)
Thousands of people spent the early hours Thursday huddled under blankets outside Soldier Field with dreams of being the next "American Idol." The huge crowd gathered at Soldier Field for Friday's auditions for the show, to be held under 12 tents staked out on the grass. Raymond Echols, 19, warmed up Thursday at a karaoke stage just inside the doors and out of view of the field where the tents will house the real competition. He traveled from Iowa City, where he is a sophomore at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with his father, Raymond, and his girlfriend. "If I make it and I go to Hollywood, I would definitely take some time off from school and just go with it," he said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0509160145sep16,0,2414414.story?page=1&coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Former UI Medical Student Wins Second Chance (Providence Journal, Sept. 15)
The state medical board granted a trainee license to Dr. Mark Boutros, 30, but placed him on probation because he had been expelled from his first medical school and had to complete his medical degree at another school. Boutros is starting a Brown Medical School residency in internal medicine at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, in Pawtucket. Boutros had been asked to leave the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE because he falsified information in a patient record. The newspaper is based in Rhode Island.
http://www.projo.com/news/content/projo_20050915_docs15.183a8acd.html

UI Alumnus Directs Play About Macbeth Curse (North County Times, Sept. 15)
Whenever a theater stages Shakespeare's "Macbeth," legend has it that bad luck is certain to occur. Actors are so superstitious about the curse of "Macbeth" that they rarely utter the play's name inside a theater, referring to it only as "the Scottish Play." That's the title and subject of Lee Blessing's latest play that has its world premiere this month at the La Jolla Playhouse. Blessing's "The Scottish Play" is a broad comedy about a seemingly cursed production of "Macbeth" at Michigan's Northernmost Shakespeare Festival. "I think the superstition about the curse is great fun," Blessing said in a phone interview from Camden, N.J., where he runs the graduate playwriting program at Rutgers University. Growing up in the Twin Cities, Blessing said he attended a 1960s "Macbeth" production in St. Paul, where the 36-year-old actor playing the title role had a heart attack onstage the very next night and died on his way to the hospital. Then, when Blessing was a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late '70s, he attended a "Macbeth" in which the actress playing Lady Macbeth (who has a spectacular mad scene in the play) had to be committed to a mental hospital for a nervous breakdown. "It's rare that I've seen a 'Macbeth' where something awful hasn't happened," he admits. The newspaper is based in California.    
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2005/09/14/entertainment/theater/91405111918.txt

Fund Created To Help Former UI Basketball Player Arnold (WQAD-TV, Sept. 14)
People wishing to help former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Kenny Arnold may do so by contacting any US Bank location. Arnold is battling brain cancer. Coach and team members have recently rallied to aid the athlete. There have reportedly been improvements in his condition since that time. Anyone interested in helping Arnold pay for medical expenses can visit any US Bank location and donate to the Kenny Arnold Trust. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3848231

Crosset Comments On Elderly Mental Health Care (San Diego Tribune, Sept. 14)
There's no disputing that the nation is turning gray. The first baby boomers will hit 65 in just six years. That means health care can only become an ever-larger issue. This is especially true when it comes to mental illness. Not only are more people living long enough to develop late-onset mental disorders, but the chronically mentally ill are living longer, too. And existing care for elderly psychiatric patients is almost uniformly inadequate. The medical profession is part of the reason why care is lacking, some contend. They say primary care doctors often dismiss psychiatric ailments like depression as simply part and parcel of becoming old. "There's a perception that depression/forgetfulness/confusion/delusions are normal in old age," said Dr. JUDITH CROSSETT, director of geriatric psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "Some loss of function is normal, but depression, dementia and associated symptoms are not. It's ageism: 'Of course, he's depressed, he lost a spouse, had to give up driving, had to move into a nursing home.' Balderdash."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/science/20050914-9999-lz1c14jeste.html

Former UI Professor Finds Refuge In Florida (Gainesville Sun, Sept. 14)
Hurricane Katrina pushed Loyola University professor Timothy Cahill out of New Orleans and into his sister's home in St. Petersburg. But the Internet is bringing him to the University of Florida. UF religion professor Vasudha Narayanan, whose studies include the Hindu traditions in India, Cambodia and America, and Hinduism and the environment, read about Cahill on an academic Listserv. She immediately invited him to be a guest lecturer in her classes -- and the department chairman agreed. Cahill, who earned his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, is also an associate professor specializing in the religious traditions of South Asia. He plans to visit a few undergraduate and graduate classes beginning next week. Cahill and his wife fled New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina and are now living temporarily in St. Petersburg. They left their New Orleans home quickly without much time to pack, he said. Cahill taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Lehigh University and the University of Pennsylvania before moving to Loyola. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050914/LOCAL/209140319/1078/news

Levy Concerned about Dental Health Disparities (New York Times, Sept. 13)
The dental health of adolescents and adults improved over the past decade, a new report has concluded. But the report, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, also revealed a sharp increase in dental decay, or caries, among the nation's poorest and youngest children. Dr. STEVEN M. LEVY, a professor in the department of preventive and community dentistry at the University of Iowa, also said he was concerned about the disparities among racial and income groups revealed in the report, released this summer, but he said he saw some improvements as well. For example, he said, "There's been a big increase in the number of poor kids with sealants, but both whites and blacks are better off than Mexican-Americans." The same story appeared on the Web site of the WILMINGTON (NC) STAR.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/13/health/13teet.html

Lutz Suggests Intelligent Design Additions (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 13)
In a satirical op-ed piece, TOM LUTZ, professor of English at the University of Iowa, suggests supplementing the teaching of Intelligent Design theory with ideas from Ghanain or Nigerian mythology, and also announces his intention to develop a new alternate creation theory, Malevolent Design.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-lutz13sep13,0,7789946.story

Polumbaum Remembers Spunky Chinese Diplomat (Peoples Daily Online, Sept. 13)
Xiong Xianghui, a veteran Chinese diplomat who participated in almost every major diplomatic breakthrough in the early years of New China, died of lung cancer at the age of 86 in Beijing late last Friday. A colorful character, Xiong was held in high esteem not only by his contemporaries, but also by people from his children and grandchildren's generations who only knew him by name. JUDY POLUMBAUM, professor of journalism from University of Iowa, remembers him as "a lively, interesting, spunky person." The Peoples' Daily is based in China.
http://english.people.com.cn/200509/13/eng20050913_208234.html

Feinstein Comments on Brain Study (The Scientist, Sept. 12)
The sooner a person becomes conscious of an image, the more likely it is that a second image shown shortly thereafter will be seen, according to a study this week in Nature Neuroscience. The research takes new ideas about how consciousness might work in the brain and shows that it actually works by very closely linking behavior to brain activity at different points in time in the brain. The French research team used these methods to develop a complete cascade of brain events associated with attentional blink-the difficulty of perceiving the second of two targets presented within a half-second of the first. The paradigm addresses the mechanism of how much can enter your awareness, said JUSTIN FEINSTEIN at the University of Iowa.
http://www.the-scientist.com/news/20050912/01

Thorne: Household Dust May Trigger Asthma (Fox News, Sept. 12)
Bacteria by-products in household dust can trigger asthma, scientists report. The by-products are called endotoxins. Adults living in homes with high endotoxin levels were more likely to have asthma, write PETER THORNE and colleagues. Thorne works at the University of Iowa's Environmental Health Sciences Research Center. Thorne's team did a national dust test from homes across the U.S. The results are enough to make you want to swab the decks and rev up the vacuum cleaner. The study appears in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,169150,00.html

Author Morrell Has New Novel; Taught At UI (Brandon Sun, Sept. 12)
Author David Morrell, whose latest novel "Creepers" is a bit of a modern gothic horror that follows four people who explore abandoned buildings, tunnels and storm drains, taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper is based in Canada. The article also ran on the Websites of several other news outlets, including MACLEANS, the OTTAWA SUN and the LONDON FREE PRESS, all in Canada.
http://www.brandonsun.com/story.php?story_id=3365

O'Dorisio Led Cancer Drug Clinical Trial (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 12)
Thomas Tomeny, a Texas teenager who lost access to an experimental drug after the end of a clinical trial, died Friday morning at home after his cancer spread. The 14-year-old boy, known as "T.J.," was diagnosed with a brain tumor in the summer of 2002, and underwent two surgeries before trying an experimental medicine made by Novartis SA. After the first dose of the radioactive drug, called OctreoTher, T.J.'s tumor shrank by one-third. He received two more treatments as part of the clinical trial. The future of the experimental medicine that may have extended T.J.'s life is unclear. SUE O'DORISIO, the oncologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinic who ran the clinical trial in which T.J. participated, declined to discuss the treatment's status. A spokeswoman for Novartis said the drug was complex to develop and the regulatory environment uncertain, prompting the firm to explore partnerships with other companies to complete the testing needed to bring it to market.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112654502619538220,00.html

Nancy Drew Author Benson Attended UI (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 11)
In "Girl Sleuth," Melanie Rehak skillfully tells the story of Nancy Drew's two main writers, Mildred Wirt Benson and Harriet Stratemeyer Adams, and how Nancy evolved over time through their talents. Rehak also recounts how the ups and downs of the children's publishing business affected the series. Benson and then Adams gave Nancy dimension and boosted her to popularity in the years starting a decade after suffrage and running through the second wave of feminism in the 1960s. Their biographies are reminders of the quieter trailblazing that persisted throughout the middle decades of the last century. Benson entered the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1922. In 1927 she got her master's degree in journalism at Iowa (the first woman to do so) and went on to a publishing career during which she wrote more than 120 children's books. She became, during World War II, a city hall reporter for the Toledo Times and eventually a columnist for the Toledo Blade. Benson continued writing her column until she died at 96 in 2002.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/booksmags/chi-0509100268sep11,1,7671151.story

UI Student's Fatal Fall Deemed Accidental (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Sept. 11)
The death of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from the Twin Cities who fell from a second-story balcony was an accident, officials said. Joseph Domke, 20, of Apple Valley died of head injuries, Johnson County Medical Examiner Stephen Scheckel said. Emergency crews responded early Aug. 31 to a report of a man who had fallen from a balcony at a downtown apartment. Domke, a junior, was taken to University Hospitals, where he later died. The balcony had a secure railing. There were two other people on the balcony at the time, police said. All three were underage and had been drinking, police Lt. Sid Jackson said. It was still unknown if alcohol played a role in Domke's death. It could be three weeks before the results of toxicology tests are available, Jackson said.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/local/12613744.htm

UI Welcomes Scientists Displaced By Katrina (Boston Globe, Sept. 10)
Hurricane Katrina devastated scientific research in New Orleans, claiming thousands of laboratory animals, ruining valuable caches of tissue and interrupting clinical experiments as patients scattered across the nation.

Research into treatments for epilepsy, hypertension and obesity, as well as the development of vaccines, has been severely impeded by the storm. Restoring what has been lost could easily take years, researchers said. Tulane University and the New Orleans medical campus of Louisiana State University are the engines that power research in the city, together garnering $132 million in ongoing federal grants. Researchers on the two campuses are recognized for their work in kidney disease, heart disease, cancer and alcohol-related ailments. The storm has made scientists such as Kyriakos Papadopoulos of Tulane exiles from their labs. He was among a large cadre of collaborators working on vaccines against possible bioterror agents. Scientists in Boston and other research hubs have opened their labs, and their homes, to displaced professors so they can attempt to restore their work on drugs and vaccines -- work that represents years of painstaking experimentation. LSU researchers from New Orleans have established bases on the university's main campus in Baton Rouge, as well as the University of Texas in San Antonio, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2005/09/10/exiled_from_their_la_labs_scientists_assess_their_losses/

Ambulance Service Manager Attended UI (Skagit Valley Herald, Sept. 9)
Skagit County's ambulance system now has an operations manager. The system's executive board hired Bill Holstein, a former Oregon fire chief, to fill the position. Holstein started Thursday. Holstein said he has been a volunteer firefighter and went to paramedic school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 10 years ago. He served as fire chief in Pacific County, and most recently was chief in Sheridan, Ore., for 4 1/2 years. The Sheridan Fire Board voted in May not to renew Holstein's contract. The paper is based in Washington.
http://www.skagitvalleyherald.com/articles/2005/09/09/news/news04.txt

Hovenkamp Says Realtors Shouldn’t Fight Suit (cnetNews.com, Sept. 9)
The U.S. Justice Department asked a federal court on Thursday to strike down a new real estate industry rule that authorities say cripples competition from Internet-based brokers. The Justice Department filed suit against the industry's main trade group, the National Association of Realtors, or NAR, challenging a bylaw that allows brokers to withhold their listings from online competitors. The new rule "prevents consumers from receiving the full benefits of competition and threatens to lock in outmoded business models and discourage discounting," the department said in a statement. Lawyers for the government said they filed the civil antitrust lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Chicago, having rejected a proposal by NAR to modify the disputed bylaw to accommodate antitrust concerns. At least one online real estate broker has already shut down because all its competitor brokers had withheld their listings, the department said in its lawsuit. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law professor at the University of Iowa, said the government's objections to the NAR bylaw were well-grounded in antitrust law. "If I were (NAR's) legal counsel, I would advise them to back down," Hovenkamp said. A version of this Reuters story also appeared Sept. 9 on the websites ZDNET.com and EXPRESSINDIA.com.
http://news.com.com/Feds+target+realtor+group+over+anti-Web+policy/2100-1030_3-5856383.html

UI Study Connects Dust Bacteria With Asthma (Newsinferno.com, Sept. 9)
A recent study commissioned by the National Institute of Environmental Health Services (NIEHS) at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has revealed that bacteria found in common household dust generate chemicals that could cause asthma related symptoms (like wheezing) as well as full blown asthma. Published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the nationwide study is the first of its kind.
http://www.newsinferno.com/storypages/9-09-2005~003.html

Thorne: Endotoxin Exposure Increases Asthma Risk (Daily Mail, Sept. 8)
Scientists found a link between bacterial chemicals, particularly those found on bedroom floors, and increased respiratory problems in adults. The study said households with higher concentrations of dust experienced higher levels of asthma-linked problems. The findings are expected to lead to new insights into how to prevent and treat asthma. PETER THORNE, lead author and Professor at the University of Iowa, said the study suggested that exposure to such chemicals, known as endotoxins, increased the risk of asthma in everyone. "Endotoxin exposure worsens asthma symptoms in adults, regardless of whether an individual has allergies or not," he said. The study was published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. It involved analysis of more than 2,500 dust samples from 831 homes across the US. The newspaper is based in the U.K. A version of this article also appeared Sept. 8 on the website IRELANDON-LINE.com.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/health/thehealthnews.html?in_article_id=361785&in_page_id=1797

Schnoor Comments On Flood Sediment Risk (Lexington Courier-Journal, Sept. 8)
Cleaning up New Orleans after the floodwater recedes likely will involve massive demolition, decontamination and a race to remove sediment before it hardens into something resembling concrete. Officials and academic experts stressed that the public-health risks from New Orleans' so-called "toxic gumbo" should diminish as water flows out. And sediment left behind shouldn't be a health concern, one expert said. "I don't think it will be hazardous waste," said JERALD SCHNOOR , a University of Iowa environmental engineering professor and an EPA adviser. "It will just be material that needs to be accumulated, cleaned up and disposed of, probably in a landfill situation." The newspaper is based in Kentucky. 
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050908/NEWS01/509080388/1008

Boy Treated At UI For Clubfoot (Times Daily, Sept. 8)
Jared Brown was born with a clubfoot. He's no longer in a cast and it's hard to tell the difference between his two little baby feet as he toddles around after big brother Jason, who's three. But his treatment and medical visits will continue for a couple of years. Jared traveled Tuesday to the University of Iowa hospital for a checkup. And he's getting a helping hand from Angel Flight Southeast, a nonprofit group that arranges free air travel to and from medical treatment facilities for those with needs. He had been referred by a Gadsden area physician to the Children's Hospital in Birmingham. The referral was for surgery, April Brown, his mother, said, but the doctor there told her about DR. IGNACIO PONSETI at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Dr. Ponseti, 91, advocates the Ponseti Method, which corrects the foot without surgery. Ponseti came out of retirement to work on cases. He travels the world to help children with clubfeet. The newspaper serves northwest Alabama. The article also appeared in TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, and several other news websites.
http://www.timesdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050908/APN/509080529&cachetime=5

Media Artist Earned Degrees At UI (Lincoln Journal, Sept. 8)
Robert Arnold is one of New England's most accomplished media artists, using computers in the creation of his short looping videos. His most recent work, "Zeno's Paradox," will be on display at DeCordova Museum's Phyllis and Jerome Lyle Rappaport Media Space Sept. 10 through Jan. 8, 2006. He earned a doctor of philosophy in film theory and production from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Massachusetts.
http://www2.townonline.com/lincoln/artsLifestyle/view.bg?articleid=319044

Student's Death Ruled Accidental (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Sept. 8)
Officials say the death of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student who fell from a second-story balcony last week was an accident. Twenty-year-old Joseph Domke of Apple Valley, Minn., died on Aug. 31 after he fell from the balcony at an apartment building. Police say Domke and two others were on the balcony at the time. All three had been drinking. Officials say it's still unclear if alcohol was a factor in Domke's death. The newspaper is based in Minnesota. The article also appeared on the websites of the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, WCCO-TV, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the GRAND FORKS HERALD and IN-FORUM in North Dakota. http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/state/minnesota/12591505.htm

Musician Graduated From UI (Press & Sun-Bulletin, Sept. 8)
Iowa musician Pieta Brown reaches backward for inspiration on her forthcoming album, "In The Cool." Brown grew up in a family of musicians -- her father is Grammy-nominated songwriter Greg Brown -- and some of her earliest memories are of her great-grandparents hosting sing-alongs around an old pump organ. Growing up in Iowa and Alabama, Brown always figured music was something that she'd do on the side. She earned a linguistics degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1996. The newspaper is based in New York. http://www.pressconnects.com/entertainment/stories/090805s189578.shtml

Martin Book Noted In Labor Commentary (Mother Jones, Sept. 7)
This commentary says the way in which the press has covered labor deserves closer attention. CHRISTOPHER MARTIN, a communication studies professor at the University of Iowa, recently dealt with this issue in his book, "Framed: Labor and the Corporate Media." Martin argues that the media "frames" labor disputes using five key assumptions. First, the consumer is always right: the press will investigate how strikes affect consumers, while devoting scant attention to workplace conditions. Second, the public doesn't need to know about the process of production, or, if anything, can be told in simple terms. Third, business leaders are the true heroes of the American economy. Fourth, the workplace is and should be a meritocracy. Fifth, collective action distorts the market. These assumptions, Martin argues, guide the vast majority of labor coverage.
http://www.motherjones.com/commentary/columns/2005/09/laborcoverage.html

New Author Bauer Attended Iowa Writers' Workshop (City Pages, Sept. 7)
A feature on Minneapolis native and "Minnesota Monthly" staffer Ann Bauer discusses her debut novel, "A Wild Ride up the Cupboards." The book is about a mother who struggles to raise a child with a confounding, nameless disability that keeps him curtained off from his loved ones. But it's also about a troubled, disarmingly true marriage, a loving family that can't name even its long-dead ghosts, a friendship that falters after decades of fealty. Ultimately, it's about a driven, talented, flawed woman, who, in the process of loving her baffling child, becomes a better person. In May of 2002, Bauer graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with an MFA in creative writing. A prestigious degree,  but for the newly single parent, no meal ticket. Bauer landed a job teaching gifted high school students at a summer program in Rhode Island. The paper is based in Minneapolis.
http://www.citypages.com/databank/26/1292/article13657.asp

Author Morrell Has New Novel; Taught At UI (Canada.com, Sept. 6)
Author David Morrell, whose latest novel "Creepers" is a bit of a modern gothic horror that follows four people who explore abandoned buildings, tunnels and storm drains, taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.canada.com/entertainment/books/story.html?id=f5957fd5-7854-41c5-bc4f-98fd3b5ca8c2

Alumnus Gives Advice to Graduate students (Inside Higher Ed, Sept. 6)
Brian Bialkowski, who received his PhD from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, gives advice to graduate students who are trying to finish their dissertations.
http://www.insidehighered.com/careers/2005/09/06/bialkowski

Hurst: Mind Your Email Manners (Burlington Free Press, Sept. 5)
Among the faux pas that many recent college graduates make early in their careers is begin too casual in their emails, according to DEE HURST, director of human resources at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. "A lot of new grads get nailed in their career early for sending really too casual e-mails," Hurst said. An e-mail is still a written document that can be printed and forwarded, so use proper grammar and check your spelling. As a rule of thumb: Visualize any e-mails you send as also going to a manager two levels above you, Hurst said. Also nix the online abbreviations, and save the "emoticons," which use punctuation to express emotion, for text messages to your friends. The Free Press is published in Vermont.
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050905/BUSINESS/509050312/1003/NEWS05

Edwards Curates Photography Exhibit (Absolutearts.com, Sept. 5)
The exhibition Acting Out: Invented Melodrama in Contemporary Photography explores significant contemporary photography that features fabricated melodrama, characterized by pathos, over-wrought emotion, moral polarization, nontraditional plotting, and extraordinary events. Curated by KATHLEEN A. EDWARDS, University of Iowa Museum of Art Curator of Prints, Drawings, Photographs, and New Media, Acting Out is a lively display of 31 works by 13 artists who investigate melodrama as an aesthetic system of representation influenced by literature, theater, film, media stills, and historic photography. The exhibition will be on view at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, NY, through December 31. Stories on the same topic appeared on the Web sits of ART DAILY and PHOTOGRAPHY.ABOUT.COM.
http://www.absolutearts.com/artsnews/2005/09/05/33280.html

Story Cites Weinstock Whipworm Research (The Telegraph, Sept. 5)
A story about British researchers using a species of flatworm to find a cure for asthma and other allergies cites similar research by JOEL WEINSTOCK, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa, who has used a parasite called a whipworm (Trichuris suis) to treat patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease. In many cases, symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding and diarrhea disappeared completely, and some went into complete remission. The Telegraph is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2005/09/05/nworm05.xml&sSheet=/news/2005/09/05/ixhome.html

Jennisen: Car Seats Save Kids' Lives (EmaxHealth.com, Sept. 5)
All 50 states in the U.S. require child safety seats and with good reason. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, child safety seats can reduce the risk of potential injury as much as 69 percent in infants and 47 percent in children between the ages of one and four. In Iowa, child car seats and seat belt use are also the law. CHARLES JENNISEN, Children's Hospital of Iowa pediatric emergency medicine specialist in the Emergency Treatment Center at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, says the use of child safety seats is our best defense against the number-one killer of children, which is motor vehicle crashes. "Unfortunately, these child restraint devices are often misused or improperly installed. A recent study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that more than 80 percent of child safety seats with harness devices were critically misused in a way that might prevent the seat from properly reducing injury risk. Some car safety seat check-up events performed in Iowa have found misuse in up to 90 percent of those seats checked," he says.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/50/3092.html

House: Heat Increases Chances of Health Problems (EmaxHealth.com, Sept. 5)
It is the time of year when people head outdoors, into the summer sun, heat, and humidity. You hear a lot about wearing sunscreen to prevent sunburn, but the summer humidity can quickly cause health problems as well. HANS HOUSE, a physician in the Emergency Treatment Center at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, says hot weather can cause a variety of health problems, including dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. "Extreme heat is especially hazardous to the very young and the elderly who have less ability to compensate for the temperature," says House. "They may not be able to get out of the heat or may be on medications that interfere with the body's regulatory systems."
http://www.emaxhealth.com/34/3094.html

Fisher's Research On Tax Breaks Included In Book (Business Week, Sept. 5)
A review of "The Great American Job Scam: Corporate Tax Dodging and the Myth of Job Creation," by Greg LeRoy, says the most disturbing information in the book is evidence that states and cities are usually paying companies to do what they would have done anyway. Using both specific examples as well as broader studies, LeRoy shows how companies pit prospective sites against one another to get the best tax deal -- then usually locate the new facilities in the region they had chosen in the first place. In fact, an estimated 96 percent of company tax breaks are such windfalls, according to work LeRoy cites by University of Iowa professor PETER FISHER. To put it another way, officials are handing out millions to influence a minute number of job shifts. "I think of it like using dynamite to catch fish," writes LeRoy.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_36/b3949137.htm

Alumna Publishes Novel (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Sept. 4)
Four Minnesotans are celebrating publication of their first novels this fall. Among them is Ann Bauer, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose book, "A Wild Ride Up the Cupboards," was published earlier this year.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/entertainment/12538061.htm

Roth Taught at Writers' Workshop (New York Times, Sept. 4)
Novelist Philip Roth has become only the third living writer to have his works collected in a multi-volume Library of America set, the first two volumes of which were just published. In this profile of Roth, the story mentions he once taught at the Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/04/books/04mcgr.html

UI's Online Chemistry Quizzes Cited (Winston-Salem Journal, Sept. 4)
A pilot group of about 100 students at Wake Forest University will be using Personal Digital Assistants this year, including about 50 students enrolled in a chemistry class. The idea is to gauge how students use the technology in and out of class, and whether it will help them balance chemical equations, understand reactions and review concepts. It's one example of new technology working its way into college classrooms. Another is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's online quizzes that give chemistry students feedback on problems they get wrong. They took the quizzes on computers and didn't necessarily need a new electronic device.
http://www.journalnow.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WSJ%2FMGArticle%2FWSJ_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031784859834&path=!localnews!education!sub!article&s=1037645509111

Hunnicutt: Work Is the Modern Religion (CBC, Sept. 3)
Labor Day traditionally marks the end of summer - and summer is ending with millions of Canadians not having taken all the vacation they could have. Statistics show one in four working Canadians don't take all the time off they are entitled to - which is an average of 21 days annually. The average employee gives up three vacation days a year, according to a survey by Ipsos-Reid Canada. Experts say workers are worried about job security and advancement. BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a historian and professor at the University of Iowa, argues leisure time has become "trivialized" while work has been "elevated to the modern religion," a way for people to define themselves and find meaning in their lives. As a result, he says, time off can lead to a feeling of emptiness and boredom.
http://www.cbc.ca/story/canada/national/2005/09/03/missed_vacation20050903.html

UI Invites North Korean Writer to Writing Program (Metro News, Sept. 3)
US officials have urged North Korean officials to improve human rights and crack down on counterfeiting of foreign currencies. They also said Washington would welcome the prospect of a tour by the Pyongyang circus and a visit by the North Korean wrestling team. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has invited North Korea to send a poet to its International Writers' Program. Metro News is based in Toronto. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the MALAYSIA STAR, SWISSINFO and REUTERS.
http://www.metronews.ca/reuters_international.asp?id=93091

Photography Exhibition Originated at UI (New York Times, Sept. 2)
The exhibition "Acting Out: Invented Melodrama in Contemporary Photography," which opens Sunday at the Neuberger Museum of Art on the campus of the State University of New York here, is a modest but focused effort that brings back old memories and differences. Specifically, it recalls a point in the early 1980's when Douglas Crimp, a pioneering art critic, lamented in an essay the growing popularity of postmodernism's cutting-edge strategy, appropriation. "Acting Out" puts 33 works on view, mostly large color photographs by 13 fairly young artists from the United States, Israel and Europe. It originated at the University of Iowa Museum of Art in Iowa City, where it was organized by KATHLEEN A. EDWARDS, the museum's curator of prints, drawings, photographs and new media. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/02/arts/design/02smit.html?pagewanted=1&8hpib

Gantz Comments on Cochlear Implants (Washington Post, Sept. 2)
I. King Jordan, the man who for 17 years has symbolized the rights, the abilities and the strength of deaf people, announced yesterday that he will step down from the presidency of Gallaudet University. He was named president in 1988. About the same time Jordan took office, cochlear implant technology was approved. The technology has improved to become standard treatment, said BRUCE GANTZ of the University of Iowa. Most infants are screened for hearing problems, and in studies, Gantz said, researchers have found that babies given cochlear implants grow up speaking, developing language and learning to read just as their hearing peers do. Some in the deaf community have fought those changes. They worry that deaf people might no longer speak a common language, that there would no longer be a deaf community. "We understand where the deaf culture is coming from -- we're a threat to their culture," he said. Doctors don't want to wipe that out, Gantz said, but they do want to be able to offer the opportunity to hear. 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/01/AR2005090102149.html

Hawkeye Football Success Noted (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 2)
It was long ago conceded that Iowa did not have the player population base to compete with Michigan and Ohio State in the Big Ten Conference - yet it grew to relish its scrap-dog role. "It's a cultural thing," Bob Rasley, a 1955 Iowa grad, says as he collects the $4 entrance fee at the University of Iowa Hall of Fame. "Iowans enjoy kicking their toes in the dirt and saying, 'Aw shucks, guys,' and then they go kick your ...." Given this backdrop, it's almost frightening what people are now kicking around. After going 31-7 the last three seasons - the most successful stretch in school history - Iowa is ready for its college football close-up. Led by seventh-year Coach KIRK FERENTZ, the Hawkeyes have become, arguably, the Big Ten's model franchise and - dare we suggest? - a perennial power.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-iowa2sep02,1,4382758.story?page=1&ctrack=1&cset=true&coll=la-headlines-sports

Alumnus Met Wife on Airplane (St. Petersburg Times, Sept. 2)
Matt Nassif met his wife, Nicole Capitano aboard 2004 Northwest Airlines flight to Detroit where they were seated next to each other, talking about each other and their families. Nassif was born to Lebanese-American parents, Sandy and Gene, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate, he lives in a Detroit suburb and sells orthopedic surgery equipment for Linvatec, whose headquarters are in in Largo, Fla. The newspaper is based in Florida. http://www.sptimes.com/2005/09/02/Citytimes/Love_at_first_flight.shtml

UI Portion Of Transportation Dollars Cited (Chronicle, Sept. 2)
Colleges and universities will receive more than half a billion dollars for pork-barrel projects from the federal transportation bill signed into law by President Bush last month, according to an analysis by The Chronicle. The six-year, $286.4-billion bill, which returns federal gasoline-tax revenue to the states for road-construction and public-transit projects, contains a record 174 earmarks for colleges, more than three times the number included in the 1998 reauthorization of the transportation law. Critics of earmarking say that some of the projects that made their way into the 1,752-page bill are only tangentially tied to transportation. Thomas A. Schatz, president of Citizens Against Government Waste, cites a $3 million grant to the State University of New York at Buffalo for earthquake-engineering research and $1 million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for the Native Roadside Vegetation Enhancement Center. "It does raise questions about what the purpose of the bill is, and what we're doing with this excess, it seems, gas-tax money," he said. "Maybe we should lower the gas tax and turn some of this money back to the states." http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i02/02a00101.htm

Fleagle Among Recipients Of Microsoft Email (Chronicle, Sept. 2)
College technology administrators who had worried that Microsoft was not listening to them now have another chance to make themselves heard. The company says it will resume regular meetings of an advisory group of college officials in academic technology. In an e-mail message, Anthony Salcito, a general manager at Microsoft's education division, informed 18 college technology officials that Microsoft wants to revive the Higher Education Advisory Group, which the administrators had served on. The group last met in March 2004, and many of its members believed it had been disbanded. Salcito's e-mail message came shortly after some college administrators complained publicly that frank talks between them and high-level Microsoft officials had broken down. Among the recipients of Mr. Salcito's e-mail message was STEVE FLEAGLE of the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i02/02a04401.htm

Schnoor: Floodwater Volume Dilutes Chemical Danger (New York Times, Sept. 1)
Although the water that now covers much of New Orleans is a fetid broth of sewage, with gasoline from gas stations, solvents from dry cleaners and chemicals from household cleaners mixed in, it could have been a great deal worse, experts said yesterday. In their worst fears, the hurricane-blown storm surge would have crashed over levees through the chemical plants south and east of the city, cracking open storage tanks and stirring large amounts of highly toxic substances into the floodwaters. But that "did not happen, to our knowledge," said John H. Pardue, director of the Louisiana Water Resources Research Institute at Louisiana State University. "It's not the worst scenario we could have envisioned." Still, the floodwaters are hardly pristine. Some dangerous chemicals are heavier than water, potentially forming toxic pools that are not visible. Gasoline and other fuel floating on the surface can catch fire. The chemicals probably do not pose a major health hazard now, scientists said. "The concentrations would have to be much, much larger when it's diluted by so much floodwater like that," said JERALD SCHNOOR, a professor of environmental engineering at the University of Iowa and editor of the journal Environmental Science and Technology. "I can't imagine that would be a large problem." But as the floodwaters recede, they could concentrate in a layer of contamination that would complicate the cleanup.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/01/national/nationalspecial/01water.html

UI Flood Website Cited (Forbes, Sept. 1)
As the toxic backwash of Hurricane Katrina continued to swallow up New Orleans and surrounding areas, federal officials declared a public health emergency for the entire Gulf Coast Wednesday. In the aftermath of one of the worst natural disasters in U.S. history, the massive flooding could turn the affected areas into a breeding ground for a variety of serious health problems, hurricane experts had predicted on Tuesday. A note at the end of the article directs people to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for more information about health risks from flooding. The link takes readers to a flood health and safety Web page at the University Hygienic Laboratory.
http://www.forbes.com/lifestyle/health/feeds/hscout/2005/08/31/hscout527741.html

Columnist Cites 'Party Schools' List (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Sept. 1)
Once again the list of top "party schools" has been released by The Princeton Review -- no connection with Princeton University -- and once again the University of Texas at Arlington didn't make the Top 10. Or Top 20. Or Top 30. No doubt many parents of students attending the local institution of higher education are rejoicing at this bit of news, probably having invested in a series of costly tuition loans that'll require a decade of debtor servitude. A columnist writes that at UT-Arlington, both the university and the town really need to work on that party school status item. It's in both of their best interests to do so. If memory serves, enrollment at the University of North Texas took a sharp swing upward when a similar survey -- albeit conducted by Playboy Magazine -- listed it as one of the nation's top party schools. In case you're curious, the nation's top-ranked party school -- based on a survey of more than 100,000 students -- turned out to be the University of Wisconsin at Madison, followed, in order, by Ohio University-Athens, Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, the University of California-Santa Barbara, State University of New York at Albany, Indiana University-Bloomington, the University of Mississippi, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Loyola University New Orleans. Maybe UT-Arlington can never be as festive as the University of Wisconsin at Madison, the president of which incidentally referred to the Princeton Review survey as "junk science." But let's see what he says when all those student applications start rolling in, not to mention the ecstatic reaction of Madison's merchants and chamber of commerce. The newspaper is based in Texas.
http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/news/12533660.htm

Mother Honors Late UI Graduate (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 1)
Ten years after her youngest son was struck and killed as he rode his bicycle along a Utah highway, Ina Jones of Lake Forest is committed to not only keeping his memory alive but also fulfilling some of the promise of a life cut short. She took out a full-page ad last week in a local newspaper featuring a photo of Jonathon "JT" Turner, a 1987 Highland Park High School graduate who died at age 26. The ad's message was simple: Don't drink and drive. An aspiring screenwriter and avid skier, Turner had moved to Park City, Utah, after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In addition to operating ski lifts, he worked as a bartender at a local restaurant and was returning from that job on Aug. 24, 1995, when he was hit by a man accused, but not convicted, of driving while intoxicated.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/north/chi-0509010243sep01,1,5271527.story?coll=chi-newslocalnorth-hed

Writer Responds To Blumberg Essay (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 1)
A letter-writer responds to an opinion piece written by MARK BLUMBERG , professor of psychology at the University of Iowa, in which he describes the aftermath of the Seashore Hall break-in for which the Animal Liberation Front has claimed credit. The letter writer disagrees with Blumberg's claim that those who trashed his laboratory have a distrust of and disdain for science. "I don't think that's true. I think they like science but have a distrust of and disdain for people who torture and kill animals in its name."
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/orl-myword0105sep01,0,6203015.story?coll=orl-opinion-headlines

Former UI Employee Supports Confidentiality (Centre Daily Times, Sept. 1)
A letter writer supports an opinion piece that called for employee salaries at Penn State to be kept confidential. "Several years ago, my wife and I both worked at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which, along with other state universities in that state, discloses the salaries of all its employees. Each year, like clockwork, a low rumble would begin on the day in April that salaries were disclosed, and build until hallways were filled with conversations revolving around who was overpaid, who was underpaid, and why everyone was upset at what the other person was making. While full disclosure of salary information has some uses, the value of those uses is more than outweighed by the resentment, distrust and cattiness the practice provokes." The newspaper is based in State College, Penn.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/opinion/12519351.htm

Ferentz Discusses Past, Future (Boston Globe, Sept. 1)
If you leave the Field of Dreams in Dyersville and head 70 miles southeast, you will see another field of dreams. It, too, is understated, but solid. It is Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City, home of the University of Iowa football team. In mid-summer, Kinnick Stadium is buzzing with activity. An $87 million renovation is underway. But instead of expanding, Kinnick Stadium is shrinking, if ever so slightly, as seats are widened and more state-of-the-art creature comforts are added. Again, this is the Iowa way, solidifying foundations, rather than making quick fixes that might not last. It is the same way Hawkeyes coach KIRK FERENTZ is building his team, as evidenced by three consecutive No. 8 final rankings. Mention to Ferentz that the Hawkeyes can climb higher this year and he rolls his eyes and laughs. "We're not there yet," he says with a smile and a shrug. Ferentz is sitting in his office in the Iowa football complex, talking about his past while trying to explain his future. "I've kind of lucked into jobs," he said. "I've never looked too far down the road. When I left [Iowa] in 1989, I felt it was time for a change. And when I came back, I was with the Browns when Coach [Hayden] Fry announced his retirement on ESPN News and I remember when [director of player personnel] Ozzie Newsome, came up to me and said you might want to watch this. And it just worked out. I never really had a plan or a vision. It's funny how things worked out."
http://www.boston.com/sports/colleges/football/articles/2005/09/01/heavenly_state_for_iowa/

UI Graduate Joins Firm (Arizona Republic, Sept. 1)
James O. Bell has joined the firm Lewis and Roca of Phoenix as a senior associate. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Law School in 1979.
http://www.azcentral.com/abgnews/articles/0901lawrail01.html

UI Ranked 16th For Public Service (Washington Monthly, September 2005)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was ranked 16th nationally in the Washington Monthly magazine's rankings of American colleges and universities that measures the number of students and graduates involved in public service work. "While other guides ask what colleges can do for students, we ask what colleges are doing for the country," the editors wrote. "Universities should be engines of social mobility; they should produce the academic minds and scientific research that advance knowledge and drive economic growth; and they should inculcate and encourage an ethic of service."
http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/features/2001/0201.charts.html#best

A background story on the rankings can be found here:
http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/features/2001/0201.green.html

Magazine Ranks UI Buildings In Top 25 (Buildings Magazine, September 2005)
The magazine lists the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 10th on its “A List: Who’s Who in the Buildings Market 2005.” The UI is the only university to make the top 25 list. The citation says: “The University of Iowa (UI) boasts an impressive roster of 250 campus facilities that ‘provide a physical environment that promotes university excellence.’ This Big 10 school has always been a proponent of efficiency, and recently created a high-level campus committee on energy conservation that includes staff, faculty, and students. Additionally, the UI, with much determination, took a huge - and successful - leap of faith to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, utilize a renewable waste product, and help the university reduce its cost. Its Biomass Fuel Project uses waste oat hulls (the outer shell of an oat grain that remains after the soft, protein core has been removed by milling the grain) from a nearby Quaker Oats plant as a fuel to help generate power... The university has also been recognized by several awards programs, and is currently drafting plans to build a future that embraces bioenergy. Education theory and real-world industry - could a win-win get better than that?”
http://www.buildings.com/Articles/detailBuildings.asp?ArticleID=2705

Bloom Writes On Controversial Teacher (Smithsonian, September 2005)
One of the most astonishing exercises ever conducted in an American classroom first took place in 1968 in a third-grade classroom in Riceville, Iowa. Now, almost four decades later, teacher Jane Elliott's experiment still matters -- to the grown children with whom she experimented, to the people of Riceville, population 840, who all but ran her out of town, and to thousands of people around the world who have also participated in an exercise based on the experiment. University of Iowa journalist and professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM reports on the enduring legacy of Elliott's work. Interviewing dozens of now-grown children who took part in the exercise over the years, he finds that most of them say it had a profound and sometimes surprising impact on them and their families.
http://www.smithsonianmag.si.edu/smithsonian/issues05/sep05/elliott.html

Van Voorhis Praises Infertility Foundation (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 31)
Like many young girls pushing baby dolls in strollers, Cathy Boyes dreamed of being a mother early in life. After four failed pregnancies, two unsuccessful adoptions and thousands of dollars in fertility treatments and other expenses to start a family, infertility changed her dreams. Finding only limited outlets for information and empathy, Boyes is turning her experience into something positive by starting Affording Hope Infertility Foundation. The non-profit organization will offer educational materials, a support network and seminars in which experts can answer questions about infertility and adoption. Infertility, a disease of the reproductive system, affects more than 6 million Americans of reproductive age, according to the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Men and women are affected equally. Most infertility is treated with medication or surgery, while in-vitro fertilization accounts for 5 percent to 10 percent of cases, according to the group. In the procedure, eggs are surgically removed from the ovary and mixed with sperm in a lab. Fertilized eggs (embryos) are placed in the woman's uterus. Cost can be a roadblock for couples seeking in-vitro fertilization, said Dr. BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. The procedure can cost $11,000 to $15,000 per cycle. Van Voorhis commended Boyes for starting the foundation. "We're happy that she's doing it," he said of his group of four doctors at the UI, where Boyes has gone for treatment.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/printedition/chi-0508310265aug31,1,1100372.story

Robinson Noted as Pulitzer Prize Winner (American Profile, Aug. 28)
In a section about interesting facts about Midwestern States, it's noted that Marilyne Robinson a teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her novel "Gilead."

Blumberg Writes About Seashore Attack (Orlando Sentinel, Aug. 28)
The newspaper reprints MARK BLUMBERG's first-person account of the attacks on Spence Labs and Seashore Hall by animal right activists last fall. In the piece, Blumberg, a behavioral neuroscientist at the University of Iowa, likens the attacks to terrorist attacks and expresses disgust at the activists' tactics. He also expresses frustration at a U.S. Senate hearing into animal rights groups degenerated into partisan bickering. The piece originally appeared in July in the Washington Post.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/orl-insinsanimalrights28082805aug28,0,2528536.story

 

 

 

 

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