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June, 2005 See UI in the New Archive Index

Current News Highlights

Fisher Cautions On Rankings (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, June 30)
Consider the source when eyeing business climate rankings, a University of Iowa economist cautions in a study released today by the labor-supported Economic Policy Institute. PETER FISHER, who also is part-time research director for the non-profit Iowa Policy Project, contends in his book "Grading Places" that many rating indexes push political agendas -- most often, tax reform. "None of them actually do a very good job of measuring what it is they claim to measure," Fisher said in a statement that accompanied the release of the book.
http://www.jsonline.com/bym/news/jun05/337491.asp

Fisher: Ignore Economic Rankings (New York Sun, June 30)
Although New York placed dead last among the 50 states in a recent index of "economic freedom," a new report from a University of Iowa economics professor tells Big Apple residents not to worry. In the 89-page study, PETER FISHER argues that state-by-state business climate rankings should be ignored. Mr. Fisher's findings, published today by the Washington, D.C.-based Economic Policy Institute, will come as a relief to New Yorkers after a series of recent rankings panned the Empire State for its high tax rates and endless red tape.
http://www.nysun.com/article/16363

Adolphs' Amygdala Study Cited (Guardian, June 30)
Once the preserve of philosophers alone, belief is quickly becoming the subject of choice for many psychologists and neuroscientists. Their goal is to create a neurological model of how beliefs are formed, how they affect people and what can manipulate them. RALPH ADOLPHS, a neurologist at the University of Iowa, found that if the amygdala was damaged, the ability of a person to recognize expressions of fear was impaired. A separate study by Adolphs with Simon Baron-Cohen at Cambridge University showed that amygdala damage had a bigger negative impact on the brain's ability to recognize social emotions, while more basic emotions seemed unaffected. This work on the amygdala shows it is a key part of the threat-assessment response and, in no small part, in the formation of beliefs. Damage to this alarm bell -- and subsequent inability to judge when a situation might be dangerous -- can be life threatening. In hunter-gatherer days, beliefs may have been fundamental to human survival.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/life/feature/story/0,13026,1517186,00.html

New UI Music Professor Joins Festival (Johnson County Sun, June 30)
For many years, Summerfest has offered a sort of "musical oasis" for chamber music fans. For the weeks of its operation, hardly any other classical music events take place in the area. In fact, many performers of the Kansas City Symphony travel to Colorado (Aspen or Colorado Music Festivals), Wyoming (Grand Teton Music Festival) and other summer music programs. By contrast, Summerfest brings musicians back to our area. Many are performers who are returning to Kansas City after moving away. Michael Kimber, for example, spent 20 years as a viola professor at the University of Kansas before moving to accept a position teaching at the University of Southern Mississippi. Kimber's wife, Marian Wilson Kimber will begin teaching musicology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the fall, so the Kimbers will move once again, this time to Iowa City. The newspaper is based in Kansas.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=14776264&BRD=1459&PAG=461&dept_id=155732&rfi=6

Former UI Teacher Honored (Canon City Daily Record, June 30)
The local Lions Club presented an Anne Sullivan Award for "those who work hard behind the scenes and limelight, expecting no reward or recognition" to Heather Zimmerman, who was a public school teacher for 10 years and spent six years teaching graduate students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Colorado.
http://www.canoncitydailyrecord.com/Top-Story.asp?ID=638

Former UI Journalism Director Resigns (Savannah Business Report, June 29)
The dean of the University of Georgia's Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication resigned Tuesday following allegations that he sexually harassed a female staff member. John Soloski denied allegations leveled by the staffer, but said the toll of the job on his health had become too great. Soloski's resignation will be effective Thursday. He said he had reached an agreement with the university to retain a position as a tenured faculty member in the journalism college. Soloski had been dean of the college for four years, beginning in 2001. He came to UGA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was director of that university's School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He is regarded as an authority on media and libel law, and has co-authored books on those subjects and the newspaper industry.
http://www.savannahbusiness.com/main.asp?FromHome=1&TypeID=1&ArticleID=3410&SectionID=50&SubSectionID=96

Lovaglia Co-Develops Athletics Ranking System (Chronicle, July 1)
In case the National Collegiate Athletic Association did not thoroughly confuse you this spring with its academic rankings for athletics departments, two sociology professors are happy to finish the job. MICHAEL A. LOVAGLIA, of the University of Iowa, and Jeffrey W. Lucas, of the University of Maryland at College Park, took the NCAA's Academic Progress Rates, a measure of the academic fortunes of member teams' athletes, and devised a parallel assessment of the teams' competitive successes. Their Athletic Success Rate takes into account a team's record over the past five seasons, its results in its league, its attendance, and the number of alumni playing professionally, along with a few other factors. Both the academic and the athletics rates are measured on a scale of 0 to 925. The two sociologists then created a Student Athlete Performance Rate, designed to help athletes choose the best college to maximize both their athletics and their academic success, Mr. Lovaglia says. To calculate that rate, you add the other two rates together. On the Web site of the Iowa sociology department (http://www.sociology.uiowa.edu/bestschoolsforathletes/index.htm), you can find rates for the football and men's basketball teams of the six Bowl Championship Series leagues -- the Atlantic Coast, Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, Pacific-10, and Southeastern Conferences.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i43/43a02402.htm

UI President Emeritus Freeman Pens Column (Chronicle, July 1)
JAMES O. FREEDMAN
, president emeritus of Dartmouth College and the University of Iowa, is the author of a column titled "A Theological Education," in which he writes that his undergraduate experience was "indelibly marked by teachers and writers who changed me utterly and forever. They were models of the life of the mind in action. And few influenced me, a Jew, more than two Christian clergymen: George A. Buttrick and Reinhold Niebuhr."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i43/43b00901.htm

UI To Benefit From Wireless Network (Information Week, June 29)
A non-profit organization in Iowa said Wednesday that it will lead the development of a wireless network that will provide free wireless access in three cities. The organization, the Corridor Free Wireless Network, said it will set up a wireless mesh network that provides service to the downtown areas of Cedar Rapids, Iowa City and Coralville. The free coverage also will cover the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City. The system will use mesh networking gear from Strix Systems and will also have the cooperation of Avalon Networks, a regional ISP. The project also is receiving contributions from the city of Coralville, Linn County, the Cedar Rapids Downtown District and Iowa.com. Those organizations, in turn, will find additional sponsors, according to cFree Wireless. The group did not say when the network would be available. A version of the story also ran on the Website UNSTRUNG.COM.
http://informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=164903755

Gurnett Captures Music Of Space (Chicago Sun-Times, June 29)
It doesn't exactly have a good beat, and you can't really dance to it. But the sound of space -- whistles, screeches, chirps -- gets a 10 from physicist DONALD GURNETT, a University of Iowa physicist who has spent decades collecting the cacophony of the cosmos. Top grades, too, from musician David Harrington, the lead violinist for the Kronos Quartet, which will play a piece tonight in Chicago that blends these celestial sounds with violin, viola and cello. Harrington called the trippy combination, dubbed "Sun Rings," "spellbinding." Critics have described the piece, featuring Kronos' ethereal trademark stylings, as "minimalist," with one writer likening the space sounds to "steel crickets" and "whales on ventilators." NASA commissioned the musical work in 2000 for $20,000 to help draw attention to its research. Working with NASA, Gurnett developed the "ears" -- the scientific instruments on board spacecraft -- that detect and record disturbances, sometimes sparked by lightning strikes or solar wind, in the low-density ionized gases of space called plasma. The data picked up by Gurnett's antennae are transmitted to Earth and converted or amplified into sounds a human can hear.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-space29.html

Retiring School Superintendent Attended UI (The MidWeek, June 29)
Superintendent Robert Hammon will be saying goodbye to the Sycamore School District after more than 20 years of service. Hammon is set to retire later this week. He will be replaced be incoming Superintendent Wayne Riesen, who is set to start the position in early July. Hammon received his bachelor's degree and master's degree from Western Illinois University and his Ph.D. from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The paper covers northern Illinois.
http://www.midweeknews.com/local/articles/062905-history.html

Former UI Journalism Director Resigns (Atlanta Journal Constitution, June 29)
The dean of the University of Georgia's Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication resigned his position Tuesday, less than two weeks after allegations that he sexually harassed a female staff member became public. John Soloski, who has been dean of the college for four years, said he "categorically denies" the allegations made against him by the employee and said he has worked out an agreement with the university that will allow him to retain a tenured faculty position within the journalism school. "This is just not worth it anymore," Soloski said during an interview in his lawyer's office in Athens. "I've been thinking about it for a while." The university would not comment on Soloski's resignation or the sexual harassment claim. Spokesman Tom Jackson said the university would release all statements relating to the claim and Soloski's position at the same time, most likely later this week. "The investigation is not yet complete," Jackson said. Soloski, 52, who is considered an authority on libel and media law, became dean of the Grady College in July 2001. Before that, he was director of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He has co-written books on libel law and the newspaper industry.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/0605/29ugadean.html

Soloski Steps Down As UGA Journalism Dean (Athens Banner-Herald, June 29)
The dean of the University of Georgia's journalism school will resign in the wake of a sexual harassment claim against him. The resignation is not an admission of guilt, however, John Soloski wrote in his letter of resignation. "I want to stress that in no way should this letter be construed to mean that I have violated any University policy or procedure," the dean wrote in a letter dated Monday to UGA Provost Arnett Mace. "It is simply about me being tired and needing to refocus my life on my own well-being." Soloski announced his decision in an e-mail distributed to faculty and staff of the UGA's Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication Tuesday, the day after he submitted his resignation letter to Mace. Under an agreement negotiated when he came to UGA after 20 years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Soloski will receive his dean's salary through June 30, 2006. Soloski will return to the classroom as a professor in August 2006, at a salary not less than the highest salary of any of the Grady College's full professors, he wrote. The paper is based in Athens, Ga.
http://onlineathens.com/stories/062905/uga_20050629065.shtml

UI Engineering Alumnus Profiled (Mohave Daily News, June 28)
Pawan Agrawal is a busy man. Not only does he serve as the Bullhead City engineer/community development director, he also coaches youth soccer and is on the National Board of Examiners for Engineering. Agrawal was born in Udaipur, a central western city in India, between Bombay and Delhi. He went to the Indian Institute of Technology on a national talent scholarship, and got his bachelor's degree in civil engineering. In 1989, Agrawal attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He got his master's in civil engineering. After that, Agrawal served as a consultant for the state of Nebraska, usually on matters of water resources, landfills, and environmental assessment. He lived in Omaha but his job took him to all parts of Nebraska. The paper covers Nevada, Arizona and California.
http://www.mohavedailynews.com/articles/2005/06/28/news/local/local4.txt

Sidel: Terror Laws Hurt Higher Ed (International Herald Tribune, June 28)
In an op-ed commentary, University of Iowa law professor MARK SIDEL said U.S. anti-terror laws are having a chilling effect on American college and university campuses by stifling dissent, redirecting scarce grant money to anti-terror initiatives and prompting international students to forego study at American campuses and choose instead universities in other countries. The same article was published on the Web site of the HONG KONG STANDARD.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/06/27/opinion/edsidel.php

Alum's English Major Leads To Computer Science (Concord Monitor, June 27)
Why don't you major in something useful? Why am I paying $30,000 a year for you to sit around and read poetry? If you majored in English as an undergraduate, chances are these are familiar questions. The people who ask them -- parents, grandparents, peers with more "practical" degrees -- probably mean well, but that doesn't make the questions any less annoying. Even more annoying are the constant warnings that you'll wind up shelving books for the rest of your life.  It is true that an undergraduate English degree won't prepare you for a specific career. Instead, like other liberal arts degrees, it serves as a broad base for a range of careers, many quite lucrative. Michael Dinsmore, 35, thought he was going to be a teacher when he graduated with his bachelor's degree in English and master's degree in teaching from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But he spent just one year inside a classroom, and that was teaching computer science. After that, he decided he would rather "implement" computer science than teach it. His path is instructive to other recent grads with English degrees. The Monitor is based in New Hampshire. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the FORT WORTH STAR TELEGRAM,
http://www.concordmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050626/REPOSITORY/506260334/1003/BUSINESS

Carlow Hires Former UI Administrator (Pittsburgh Business Times, June 27)
Carol Gruber is leaving the Twin Cities for the Steel City to become Carlow University's dean of student life and assistant vice president for academic affairs, the school announced Monday. Gruber has spent the last four years as director of Academic Counseling and Student Services for Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Minnesota. Previously, Ms. Gruber held a similar position at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://pittsburgh.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/stories/2005/06/27/daily7.html

UI English Alumnus Uses Education To Advantage (Washington Post, June 27)
If you majored in English as an undergraduate, chances are parents, grandparents and peers with more "practical" degrees will wonder aloud how you expect to make a real living. But while it's true an undergraduate English degree won't prepare you for a specific career, like other liberal arts degrees, it serves as a broad base for a range of careers, many of them quite lucrative. Michael Dinsmore, 35, thought he was going to be a teacher when he graduated with his bachelor's degree in English and master's degree in teaching from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But he spent just one year inside a classroom, and that was teaching computer science. After that, he decided he would rather "implement" computer science than teach it. "The first six months, I read manuals and online information constantly," said Dinsmore, of Gaithersburg, Md. "And one 'for dummies' book won't be enough -- learn everything that you can about the subject, and ask questions of your co-workers." Dinsmore sold his English degree and teaching experience to hiring managers as an advantage, not a hindrance." Versions of the story also ran in the DETROIT (Mich.) FREE PRESS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/18/AR2005061801428.html

UI Woman Was Subject Of Documentary (Lexington Herald-Leader, June 27)
Through LifeWorks Videos, Lexington filmmaker Robin Gate produces hourlong films of the elderly or dying that preserve her clients' stories and values for future generations. A friend introduced her to Cathy Tingle, who had lived with cancer for 10 years. The friend, who teaches medical students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA how to be more sensitive to patients, wanted her to interview Tingle about her experience as a cancer patient. Gate spent hours filming Tingle, who shared stories from her life, as well as her thoughts about death and sickness. Gate also spent time interviewing Tingle's doctors, friends and family members. Gate completed the film "Like Rembrandt Draperies: A Portrait of Cathy Tingle," in 2002. It has been used to educate medical students, chaplains, nurses and hospice workers about doctor-patient communication and end-of-life issues. "It changed my life," Gate said. "It was while I was interviewing Cathy that the idea for-LifeWorks came. ... It seemed that I somehow have a gift for listening deeply." The paper is based in Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/business/11982980.htm

UI Has Policy Protecting Transgendered Employees (Detroit News, June 27)
Although health plans routinely exclude sex-reassignment surgery, hormone treatment and counseling needed by transitioning employees, nine Fortune 500 companies now cover all transitioning procedures. They include IBM and State Farm, according to the Human Rights Campaign. Fortunately, employers are starting to reflect Americans' attitudes on transgender issues: According to a poll commissioned by HRC in 2002, 67 percent of likely voters say "It is possible ... to be born as one sex but inside to feel like the other sex." In 2004, HRC found 65 percent of adults say it should "definitely be illegal" to fire or refuse to hire someone for being transgendered." In 1997, Lucent Technologies became the first Fortune 500 company to put gender identity in its written anti-bias policy. Today, 54 such companies do, including such big names as Borders, Ford and Whirlpool of Michigan. Among the at least 35 colleges and universities with such written protections are Ohio State, Cornell, Arizona State, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Oklahoma State.
http://www.detnews.com/2005/editorial/0506/27/A07-228648.htm

Art Exhibit Features Gurnett Space Recordings (Chicago Tribune, June 26)
An arts exhibit at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago this week features a performance by the Kronos Quartet of "Sun Rings," a composition based on sounds recorded on instruments flying on the Voyageur, Galileo and Cassini space probes. The instruments were designed by University of Iowa physics professor DON GURNETT.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/arts/chi-0506260431jun26,1,99882.story

UI Engineering Alumnus Profiled (News-Gazette, June 26)
A feature on George Sodemann, who chose to start an engineering consulting business in Champaign-Urbana 50 years ago, says Sodemann grew up in the Mississippi River town of Clinton, Iowa, where his dad ran an auto-body repair business. He remembers his dad once remarking, on seeing employees of the Army Corps of Engineers, "Those guys have pretty good jobs." It was a remark Sodemann internalized and when he went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he enrolled in engineering drawing and inorganic chemistry classes. After serving in the Navy, he returned to school and worked in an engineering office on campus as a draftsman. For a short time, he took a job at a former ordnance plant, and it was there he met his future wife, Marjorie Edwards Sodemann. They were married on April 1, 1949. The paper covers Champaign-Urbana, Ill.
http://www.news-gazette.com/localnews/story.cfm?Number=18489

Weiler Comments On Athlete Asthma (Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, June 26)
So many people -- both recreational athletes and professionals -- are being diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma that the nation's largest group of athletic trainers has drawn up its first guidelines for dealing with the condition. The National Athletic Trainers' Association's asthma guidelines, released Tuesday during its annual meeting in Indianapolis, are aimed at familiarizing trainers, health professionals, parents and coaches with asthma's symptoms and treatments. JOHN WEILER, a professor emeritus of internal medicine at the University of Iowa who has studied exercise-induced asthma for more than 20 years, said many athletes keep their asthma secret, fearing it could hurt their chances of a professional career. "A guy who's played four years of football at state college and is looking at the NFL, it just isn't something he wants to (let) get out," he said. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/11965558.htm

Senior Saxophonist Studied At UI (Union-Leader, June 26)
In New Hampshire, the most important saxophone related moment came in 1995 when Darlene Nevins developed pneumonia. She was 70 years old at the time. Doctors prescribed rest. The rest is musical history. The restless Darlene - starved for something to keep her mind occupied while she convalesced - dug out a bunch of old saxophone records, and as she reclined in her La-Z-Boy, she let the soothing sounds wash over her. A week later - once she'd washed her hands of the whole pneumonia thing - Darlene's interest in the saxophone was reborn, thus ending a 52-year divorce between the artist and her instrument of choice. The West Branch native studied the instrument in school and planned to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and major in music. And then life intervened. There was a war going on. She worked in a bank and saved her money for college and then, two years later, when a local boy was face-to-face with the draft board, she married him to help keep him home. That was in 1943. She set her saxophone aside. For 52 years. The paper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.theunionleader.com/articles_showfast.html?article=56824

Witt: Cookbooks Replaced Personal Recipe Sharing (Sun-Sentinel, June 26)
There was a time when generations of African-American cooks learned to reproduce the flavors of home firsthand from their elders in the kitchen. But this recipe exchange was sidetracked during the Great Migration early in the 20th Century, when hundreds of thousands of African-Americans left the South for the North. "Until then, mothers passed down recipes to daughters by way of oral tradition," said DORIS WITT, an associate professor of English at the University of Iowa and the author of "Black Hunger: Soul Food and America." Witt pointed to several factors that inspired the evolution of cookbooks devoted to recipes based on African-American food traditions. Among them: families moving from one region to another, and the growth of the black middle class, which demanded more time away from home and subsequently less time in the kitchen. The newspaper is based in Florida. This story originally appeared in the Chicago Tribune.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/lifestyle/sfl-soulfoodfavjun16,0,4977833.story?coll=sfla-features-headlines

Cornell Studying Zebrafish For Cancer Spread Clues (BBCNews.com, June 25)
A tiny tropical fish is giving scientists clues about how the most serious form of skin cancer develops. A team from the University of Iowa and Northwestern University found embryos of zebrafish contain molecular cues that can stop tumors developing. They say the study provides an avenue for finding out more about what fuels the growth of malignant melanomas. The research, which has been welcomed by Cancer Research UK, is published in the journal Developmental Dynamics. The researchers implanted zebrafish embryos with fluorescently tagged human skin cancer cells. The cells were still moving around and dividing normally, but they did not form tumors, suggesting they were responding to something in the environment of the embryos. The researchers say they now want to carry out further research to find out exactly what it is within the embryos which stops the cells forming tumors. Dr. ROBERT CORNELL, an embryo specialist at the University of Iowa who worked on the study, said: "These cancer cells don't do what they do in other circumstances, such as when they are placed under a mouse's skin. The objective of our work is to use this very simple system to identify the exact component that can influence the behavior of melanoma and other cancer types." He said finding out why could lead to the development of new medications to tackle skin cancers.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4111260.stm

Hawkeye Football Player Arrested (CBSSportsline.com, June 25)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
football player Richard Kittrell was arrested for allegedly interfering with another man's arrest. Kittrell, 21, was arrested early Wednesday in downtown Iowa City and charged with interference with official acts, a simple misdemeanor punishable by a maximum $500 fine and 30 days in jail. Police said Kittrell, a 6-5, 289-pound junior defensive lineman, was with 34-year-old Matthew Mills, who was involved in a fight. When police tried to arrest Mills, they said Kittrell "held up'' Mills and kept the officer from handcuffing him. The article originally appeared in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.sportsline.com/general/story/8593528

Doctor Honored (Green Bay Press Gazette, June 24)
Dr. Herbert Sandmire of Green Bay received was named the recipient of the Ralph Hawley Distinguished Service Award presented by the University of Wisconsin Medical Alumni Association Awards Committee and the Board of Directors at an awards banquet in Madison. He also was the winner of the 2005 Helen Callon - Thomas A. Leonard M.D. Award presented by the Wisconsin Association for Perinatal Care. Sandmire has been practicing obstetrics and gynecology in Green Bay since 1959 and did his residency in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS from 1956-1959. http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/news/archive/life_21307039.shtml

Football Player Arrested (Sports Illustrated.com, June 24)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
football player Richard Kittrell was arrested for allegedly interfering with another man's arrest. Kittrell, 21, was arrested early Wednesday in downtown Iowa City and charged with interference with official acts, a simple misdemeanor punishable by a maximum $500 fine and 30 days in jail. Police said Kittrell, a 6-5, 289-pound junior defensive lineman, was with 34-year-old Matthew Mills, who was involved in a fight. When police tried to arrest Mills, they said Kittrell "held up" Mills and kept the officer from handcuffing him.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/football/ncaa/06/24/iowa.player.arrested.ap/

Kutcher Attended UI (Digital Spy, June 23
In a profile of actor Ashton Kutcher, it's noted that he studied biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the hope of helping people with the same condition as his brother who had a septal heart defect.  http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/article/ds22026.html 

Daly Named Business School Dean at Georgetown (Businessweek.com, June 23)
The Robert Emmett McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. recently announced the appointment of a new dean. George Daly will take the reins at Georgetown, after serving as dean at the Leonard N. Stern School of Business at New York University from 1993 to 2002. In recent years, he served as the Albert Fingerhut professor of business administration at Stern. Before arriving at NYU, Daly had been dean at the TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS at the University of Iowa and the College of Social Sciences at the University of Houston.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/jun2005/bs20050623_1379.htm

Researcher Honored (Medfordnews.com, June 23)
William Connor, M.D., professor of medicine (endocrinology, diabetes and clinical nutrition), Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine, has received the Distinguished Alumni Award from THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. The award is the highest honor the college bestows upon its graduates. It recognizes outstanding and influential contributions to the art and science of medicine. Connor was honored for his pioneering lipid and dietary cholesterol research, which has played a large part in establishing a link between cholesterol and heart disease. The website provides online news for Medford and the article appeared in several online news sites for Oregon towns and cities.
http://www.medfordnews.com/articles/index.cfm?artOID=304029&cp=10996

UI Meth Study Cited (Brainerd Dispatch, June 23)
Jim Atkins, manager of admissions and case management at Hazelden Treatment Center in the Twin Cities, said people are seduced by meth because it feels so good to them in the beginning. "This is a horrible drug. It runs through people's lives in short order and tears them into pieces." Hazelden follows people who have been through treatment. In 2003, Atkins said a study of nearly 500 people found 56 percent of meth addicts abstained from the drug for a year. He said the statistic was similar for people who had abused other substances. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found 60 percent of about 1,000 people treated remained free of meth one year after treatment. Meth is serious business, Atkins said, but he added it doesn't have to be. Help is available. Atkins said addicts are not beyond redemption. The newspaper is based in Minnesota.
http://www.brainerddispatch.com/stories/062305/new_0623050044.shtml

Man Sentenced In Death Of UI Student (Chicago Tribune, June 23)
A judge in Iowa this week sentenced an Arlington Heights man to 10 years in prison for the 2004 beating death of a university student, authorities said. Daniel Howard Corbett, 22, pleaded guilty last month to voluntary manslaughter in the slaying of Michael Kearney, 23, said Johnson County Assistant Atty. Anne Lahey. Authorities said he fought Kearney, a senior engineering student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and rammed Kearney's head into a wall outside a convenience store near the campus early on New Year's Eve 2003.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/nearnorthwest/chi-0506230280jun23,1,4264461.story?coll=chi-newslocalnearnorthwest-hed

Judge Prohibits Pierce From Leaving State (USA Today, June 23)
A judge on Wednesday denied former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce permission to leave the state to work out with an NBA team in California. Pierce, 21, a former star guard with the Hawkeyes, filed a motion Wednesday seeking a modification of his pretrial bond to attend a workout this week hosted by the Golden State Warriors, based in Oakland. Pierce, originally from Westmont, Ill., is scheduled to go on trial Aug. 16 on four criminal counts stemming from a January incident at the West Des Moines home of a former girlfriend. A version of this Associated Press article also appeared June 23 on CNN/SI.com and the Web sites of the BELLEVILLE (Ill.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, and CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/basketball/draft/2005-06-23-roundup_x.htm

UI Tuition Part Of Kansas Comparison (KWCH-TV, June 23)
A recent study shows you'll get more for your education dollar, by going to a Kansas University. The Kansas Board of Regents just released its comparison of all six state universities to schools across the Midwest, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. What it found were Kansas rates lower than the national and regional averages. The station is based in Kansas.
http://www.kbsd6.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=KBSD/MGArticle/BSD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031783452225

Hellstein Comments On Drug Side-Effect (Omaha World-Herald, June 22)
Some doctors and patients suspect that drugs called bisphosphonates, frequently given at high intravenous doses to lower elevated blood calcium or prevent cancer from invading bone, are causing jawbone death. Oral surgeons were among the first to notice the problem. In May 2004, a New York doctor reported seeing 63 patients with the jaw condition from February 2001 to November 2003. Of those cases, 56 had received the IV drugs Zometa or Aredia; seven had been taking oral medications. After a tooth is pulled, the bone typically remolds itself and fills in the gap. But the drugs inhibit cells that take away dead bone and clear the way for other cells to finish the rebuilding job. An estimated 90 percent to 95 percent of the 875 cases have been in cancer patients taking the intravenous versions, said Dr. JOHN HELLSTEIN, clinical professor of oral and maxillofacial pathology at the University of Iowa. A smaller number have shown up in osteoporosis patients, he said. He based his estimates on published reports, the cases he has seen and those he has discussed with other doctors. A version of this article appeared June 23 on the website REDNOVA.com.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1441928

Neuroscientist Runs Web Site (South Bend Tribune, June 22)
Ten minutes after a recent announcement that South Korean scientists had discovered an efficient way to produce stem cells, the world's largest spinal cord Web site carried the story. "It's unbelievable someone's trolling the literature and posting it right away like that," said Dr. Wise Young, administrator of www.sciwire.com. Young, a Rutgers University neuroscientist, began the Web site in July 2001. He is a professor and chair of the department of cell biology and neuroscience at Rutgers. He obtained his medical degree from Stanford University and his doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2005/06/22/living.20050622-sbt-MICH-D6-Stem_cell_research_a.sto

Field Serves On WHO Radon Project (Environmental News Services, June 22)
Exposure to a natural radioactive gas in the home and workplace causes tens of thousands of deaths from lung cancer each year, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Tuesday. Recent results from the largest radon studies ever conducted in North America and Europe show six to 15 percent of all lung cancers are caused by exposure to the gas. R. WILLIAM FIELD, Ph.D., is one of six U.S. scientists participating in the WHO International Radon Project. "This analysis, based on the largest radon data set assembled in North America, agrees with a similar large-scale radon pooled analysis performed concurrently in Europe," said Field. The University of Iowa associate professor of occupational and environmental health and epidemiology is a co-author of the study, which is reported in the March 2005 issue of the journal "Epidemiology." He was part of an international team of researchers who performed the combined analysis of the original residential radon studies, conducted in Connecticut, Iowa, New Jersey, Missouri, and Utah and South Idaho, as well as in Winnipeg, Canada. The original studies were funded from several federal sources, including the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Cancer Institute. The investigators' review of 3,662 cases and 4,966 controls from these combined studies represents the largest analytic radon epidemiologic study ever performed in North America.
http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/jun2005/2005-06-22-02.asp

Former Pediatrics Fellow Named Chief (Nashville City Paper, June 22)
Sean Donahue has been named chief of Ophthalmology at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt. Donahue, associate professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences, pediatrics and neurology at VUMC, will be creating the first Division of Ophthalmology for the pediatric population at Children's Hospital. Donahue earned his M.D. and Ph.D. in developmental neuroscience at Emory University. He did his ophthalmology residency at the University of Pittsburgh and fellowships in neuro-ophthalmology and pediatric ophthalmology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. The paper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?section_id=51&screen=news&news_id=42311

UI Ghostly Legends Cited (JuiceeNewsDaily.com, June 22)
A listing of purportedly haunted places in Iowa includes three sites at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: Currier Hall (where legend has it that three dorm mates found themselves in love with the same man and committed suicide and now reappear to promote friendship and harmony among the current tenants); Slater Hall's ninth floor (from which legend says a young student jumped to his death and that since many residents have seen the young man's ghost walking late at night carrying an ax); and Slater Hall's first floor (where in the late 1800s a man called the "Penguin man" roamed the vicinity and today is said to stalk innocent young students to eat). Juicee News calls itself a "one-stop-source among the independent internet news organizations," providing news and entertainment features. It is based in Alabama.
http://www.juiceenewsdaily.com/1004/news/haunted_iowa.html

Spence Lab Break-in Cited (Wisconsin State Journal, June 21)
The shaky, amateurish video shows everything in graphic detail: Four masked people break into darkened university labs, pour toxic chemicals onto computers and stacks of files and release hundreds of research rats and mice. They spray-paint walls with slogans such as "Science not Sadism" and "Free the Animals." The November break-in at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Spence Laboratories -- a crime for which there have been no arrests but for which the group Animal Liberation Front, or ALF, has claimed responsibility -- is characterized by university and law-enforcement officials as terrorism. Such incidents have made university campuses ground zero in a spreading national battleground over animal-based research. At UW- Madison, animal-rights activists are protesting research getting under way that uses pigs to measure the effects of police stun guns. No violent incidents have been reported in Madison, but officials have increased security at research buildings. The State Journal is based in Madison.
http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/local/index.php?ntid=44255&ntpid=1

Pulitzer Prize Winner Robinson Featured (Kansas City Star, June 21)
Unlike most Americans, MARILYNNE ROBINSON never suffers the agonies of the traffic jam, rising gas prices or a dearth of downtown parking. Robinson, who won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction earlier this year for her novel Gilead, a gentle, moving story about a small-town preacher from Iowa, prefers the rhythms of a slower, simpler life. She doesn't own a car or drive, preferring instead to walk to class, church or anywhere else in this small, Midwestern college town. "I'm so happy not to have a car," says the writer, who also doesn't own a TV set but concedes her traditional tendencies are limited by her cell phone. "I don't like cars. There is just something ridiculous about them. They are noisy ... clumsy, they choke towns. I just love walking." Robinson, who moved here in 1989 to teach at the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa, is also unapologetic about the 24 years that passed between her highly acclaimed first novel, Housekeeping, and her latest.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/11941248.htm

Cornell Study Uses Zebrafish For Tumor Study (News-Medical.net, June 21)
The embryo of a tiny, silvery tropical fish found in many home aquariums is providing cancer researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine with powerful new insights into the development of malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. In a study described in an article in the August issue of Developmental Dynamics, the laboratory groups of Mary J. C. Hendrix, at Feinberg, and of ROBERT A. CORNELL, at The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, showed that zebrafish embryos implanted with human metastatic melanoma cells provide molecular cues that suppress tumor development.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=11181

Latzman Assists In Adolescent Violence Study (News-Medical.net, June 21)
Researchers have known for some time that violent adolescents tend to become more depressed over time than other adolescents. And young people living in violent neighborhoods also are more subject to depression. But violent adolescent boys who also live in unsafe neighborhoods where they witness violent acts do not appear to get as depressed. According to a new Cornell University study, being aggressive in the context of community violence could be an adaptive strategy that preserves adolescents' sense of control in a volatile and unpredictable environment. "This may seem counter intuitive, that violence in a violent context could be somewhat protective for psychological well-being among adolescent boys," said Raymond Swisher, assistant professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell. To examine the interactive relationships among adolescent violence, street violence and depression, Swisher and ROBERT D. LATZMAN, now a graduate student in clinical psychology at the University of Iowa, analyzed data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative sample of 8,939 adolescents in grades 7 to 12. "The consequences of community violence are widespread," said Swisher. "Exposure to community violence destroys the notion that homes, schools and communities are safe places, and youths exposed to community violence have higher rates of emotional, behavioral and cognitive problems. Witnessing community violence has emerged as a risk factor for all kinds of problems, from depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms to suicidal behaviors, aggression and violence."
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=11178

Women With Social Support Fare Better (E-Max Health.com, June 21)
Women with ovarian cancer who have social support from loved ones have lower levels of an inflammatory protein released by the immune system, which could mean a more favorable prognosis, new research suggests. At high levels, the protein called interleukin-6, or IL-6, is linked with a poorer outcome for ovarian cancer patients, said ERIN COSTANZO, a graduate fellow in psychology at the University of Iowa. She is the lead author of the study, published in the July 15 issue of Cancer, which evaluated the IL-6 levels of 61 women with advanced ovarian cancer. "The closer the women's social attachment, the lower their IL-6, on a kind of continuum," Costanzo said. For the study, social attachment was defined as having at least one other person with whom you have a close connection in your life.
http://www.emaxhealth.com/102/2363.html

Hornbuckle Comments On Disposed Chemicals (The Star, June 21)
The chemicals go down the drain, but in the environment they remain. Researchers in Minnesota have found that a complex brew of everyday compounds -- from products as ubiquitous as shampoo, bug spray and even that morning cup of coffee -- lingers in waters even after they are showered off or dumped down the sink.  Little is known about the risk of these compounds, especially at the low levels detected. But 13 of them are known to disrupt the hormones and sexual development of some fish or other animals.  One major concern is the effect of natural and synthetic hormones, or chemicals that mimic hormones, on aquatic creatures. In the mid-1990s, Folmar found that male fish in the Mississippi just below the metro sewage treatment plant were becoming "feminised." Male fish had depressed levels of testosterone and were producing a yolk protein normally made only by female fish. Female walleye near the plant had five times the normal levels of estrogen in their blood compared with those taken elsewhere. A pair of synthetic musks detected frequently in the study are used to mask scents or add fragrance to shampoos, perfumes and household cleaners. KERI HORNBUCKLE, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, said at least a million pounds of these chemicals are used in the United States each year. "It's amazing that we're releasing such large quantities of them every day, yet we have almost no information about their potential costs to the environment." The Star is based in Malaysia.
http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2005/6/21/features/9436458&sec=features

Baird-Edited Book Reviewed (The Hindu, June 21)
A review of "Religion and Law in Independent India," edited by ROBERT D. BAIRD, a professor of religion at the University of Iowa. The Hindu is based in India.
http://www.hindu.com/br/2005/06/21/stories/2005062100391700.htm

Wieting Prepares Chinese Journalists For Olympics (China View, June 21)
Olympic experts gave lectures on Monday at a media workshop to help local journalists hone their reporting skills in covering the 2008 Beijing Olympics. In a speech titled Cultural Sources of Success in Olympic Events, STEPHEN WIETING, a sociology professor from the University of Iowa, delivered his insight into how the sports favored by different countries and regions could develop in the context of globalization.
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2005-06/21/content_3111910.htm

Alumnus Retiring From Home For Troubled Youth (Battle Creek Enquirer, June 20)
A story about the retirement of Arlin Ness, president of the Starr Commonwealth home, which serves 4,000 troubled young people each year, says Ness was born and raised in the small town of Estherville in northwest Iowa, where he met and married Barbara Zell. Interested in working with troubled young people since his summer-job days while attending Augustana College, Ness went on to earn a master's degree in social work from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Ness was persuaded to become director of clinical services at Starr Commonwealth's home for boys near Albion in 1968. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050620/LIFESTYLE08/506200302/1024

Drews Comments On 'Phishing' Scams (Inside Higher Ed, June 20)
A column by Michael Bugeja, director of Iowa State University's journalism school, writes about "phishing" - a subgenre of spam typically notifying e-mail recipients about "suspicious" use of an account and directing them to a link so that they can input personal data, including account numbers and passwords. The information is subsequently used for identify fraud or other nefarious purposes. Despite the investment in spam filters and procedures at college technology centers, phishing e-mail still manages to bypass IT watchdogs at some of our most security-minded institutions. JANE DREWS, information technology security officer at the University of Iowa, said that "Some of these phishing e-mails are amazingly believable."
http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2005/06/20/bugeja

Gronbeck Discusses 'Mainstream' Definition (Foxnews.com, June 20)
Political candidates hoping to get elected or judicial nominees vying for the federal bench would do well to be in the "mainstream" these days, though the media may try to distance themselves from the designation. That's because the "mainstream media" is a club increasingly loathed by the both the political right and left while "mainstream America" is regarded as the group that engenders today's values. But the determination of what is mainstream and where the it is located has been so overplayed or misstated lately that several political experts agree the term "mainstream" has become the latest casualty of political language that was once sharp and appropriate but is now devoid of clear meaning for anyone. "['Mainstream' is] a way to try and center yourself in hopes that it will give you some appeal," BRUCE GRONBECK, professor of communications at the University of Iowa, said. Gronbeck credits former President Clinton with making the mainstream popular political real estate in the 1990s. "Bill Clinton: Here you had a social liberal and [an] economic conservative," Gronbeck said. "He didn't fit the political definitions and it drove both parties crazy. We began there to talk about the mainstream."
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,160043,00.html

UI Class Enrollment Numbers Cited (San Francisco Chronicle, June 19)
A "By the Numbers" column that provides statistics about a variety of issues includes "20: Number of students who enrolled in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA course on examining pornography in popular culture."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2005/06/19/INGK0D9AOF1.DTL

Scott-Conner Cited In Health Story (Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, June 19)
A story about a condition called gynecomastia, from which men develop breasts, says the condition strikes 40 to 60 percent of men. One cause is obesity in which overweight men build up fatty tissue resembling gynecomastia - a condition called pseudo-gynecomastia. There are links between marijuana use and the rehabilitation drug methadone and gynecomastia. Body builders who take steroids also can develop the condition because anabolic steroids increase both testosterone and estrogen in men, causing breast growth. Symptoms of early-stage gynecomastia include a small lump in one or both of the breasts. Cheryl Erickson, a Fort Wayne nurse practitioner, says that's when men should go to their doctor to find out whether the lump is gynecomastia or male breast cancer, which strikes one man for every 100 women. She says the tests involve a mammogram and ultrasound to determine what the lump is. According to Dr. CAROL SCOTT-CONNER of the University of Iowa, there is no link between gynecomastia and male breast cancer. If the diagnosis is gynecomastia, treatment options include two forms of liposuction and sometimes surgery. The paper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/journalgazette/living/11909206.htm

Van Voorhis Comments On Embryonic Stem Cell Debate (Boston Globe, June 19)
Over the past two decades, since the first "test-tube baby" was born, an estimated 400,000 frozen embryos have accumulated in more than 400 fertility clinics around the country. What to do with those frozen embryos has become a matter of intense debate. Some advocate donating excess embryos for stem cell research. Embryonic stem cells are master cells that form during the early days after conception and can turn into any tissue in the body. Scientists hope one day to harness them to grow replacement tissue to treat diabetes, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries, and other diseases. However, obtaining those stem cells kills the embryo. Thus some religious groups and conservatives oppose creating embryonic stem cells for research. President George W. Bush has banned the use of federal funds for research on stem cell lines created after Aug. 9, 2001. In the late 1990s, when the University of Iowa surveyed 365 couples about what they wanted to do with embryos that had been frozen for more than two years, about 44 percent wanted to continue storage, said Dr. BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the UI. Among the remaining couples, 34 percent wanted to discard the embryos, 10 percent wanted to donate them for research, and 12 percent wanted to donate them to other couples. Van Voorhis said he supports embryo donation but that it is not the only option. "Donation for research is a very worthwhile and viable option for the embryo as well," he said. He said he uses the term embryo donation rather than adoption, because adoption means home studies, physical screenings, and counseling. Instead, the embryos are allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis, with childless couples getting additional preference. The word adoption also gives the impression that an embryo is a human being. "An embryo deserves great respect, but not the respect accorded actual persons," Van Voorhis said.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2005/06/19/debate_on_stem_cells_turns_scrutiny_to_frozen_embryos/

Wilder Recalls Prayer Compulsion While UI Student (Sunday Herald, June 19)
In an interview the actor Gene Wilder, whose biography was recently published, tells the paper an anecdote from 1951 about his time as a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, before he changed his name from Jerry Silberman. The compulsion to pray came upon Wilder during his first year at the UI. He would kneel down in front of whatever building he had to enter next. Once he plastered his curls down with Vaseline and went to class. "I thought I was too prideful so I humiliated myself to show God how humble I was." One evening, home for the Easter break, he knelt down in a field on the outskirts of town and started praying. He kept at it for eight hours straight. Although his compulsion took the form of prayer, he referred to it as 'the Demon'. "I stopped thinking of it as anything holy," he says. "I didn't have the guts to say, 'It's sick! You're just sick!' I wanted to say that but I thought, well, maybe I'm avoiding my responsibility to God." The paper is based in the UK.
http://www.sundayherald.com/50318

Ex-Hawk Pierce Seeks State Aid For Court Costs (CBS Sportsline.com, June 18)
Former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA basketball player Pierre Pierce wants the state to pick up part of his defense costs against charges that he assaulted his former girlfriend last winter. According to a financial affidavit filed in Dallas County District Court, Pierce claims he is living on $170 a month. Pierce, of Westmont, Ill., is scheduled to stand trial Aug. 16 on two counts of burglary, criminal mischief and assault with intent to commit sexual abuse stemming from a Jan. 27 incident involving his former girlfriend in West Des Moines.
http://www.sportsline.com/general/story/8575510

UI Libraries' Special Collection Of Fanzines Cited (Chronicle, June 17)
Libraries are increasingly involved in collecting pop culture. The items are not generally being collected for their intrinsic value "but for what they say about the culture as a whole," says James G. Neal, director of libraries at Columbia University. He has heard that some libraries are starting to collect video games, for example. "That's huge," he says. "How else are you going to understand the nature of adolescent development in the first decade of the 21st century?" The University of Iowa recently landed a million-dollar collection of 250,000 science-fiction "fanzines," the homemade publications of the genre's devotees, for about $75,000. Mike Horvat, the Oregon man who had collected the fanzines for about 50 years, lost his lease on a warehouse and happily gave the fanzines to Iowa after the local fire department threatened to use his collection for a practice burn. SIDNEY F. HUTTNER, head of special collections at Iowa, says the fanzines contain not only early work by well-known authors, such as Robert A. Heinlein, but also the gossip of the science-fiction community, which was involved in progressive politics.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i41/41a02501.htm

Neuroscientist Runs Web Site (Fort Wayne News Sentinel, June 17)
Ten minutes after a recent announcement that South Korean scientists had discovered an efficient way to produce stem cells, the world's largest spinal cord Web site carried the story."It's unbelievable someone's trolling the literature and posting it right away like that," said Dr. Wise Young, administrator of www.sciwire.com. Young, a Rutgers University neuroscientist, began the Web site in July 2001. He is a professor and chair of the department of cell biology and neuroscience at Rutgers. He obtained his medical degree from Stanford University and his doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/living/11919435.htm

Ruling Expected Next Month in Herbarium Lawsuit (WQAD, June 16)
A ruling is expected next month in the legal battle over a plant collection. The case involves the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which once housed the collection of dried plants, and Iowa State University, where it was moved more than a year ago. Iowa faculty, students and others sued to return the collection to Iowa City. Judge Amanda Potterfield says she'll likely make a decision next month. The judge ruled yesterday that the University of Iowa did not violate its own rules in ordering the move over the objection of curator DIANA HORTON. Potterfield also ruled it did not violate its academic obligations to staff and students in doing so. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3483606

Lutgendorf Comments On Cancer Study (Reuters, June 16)
Among women with advanced ovarian cancer, those with more psychosocial support may fare better, researchers report. They found that women with a strong support system have lower levels of a pro-inflammatory compound, interleukin-6 (IL-6), in the blood. High levels of IL-6 have been linked to faster progression and shorter survival with this malignancy. "It's relatively unusual for cancer studies looking at psychosocial factors to also look at relationships in the tumor microenvironment," Dr. SUSAN K. LUTGENDORF, from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, told Reuters Health.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=healthNews&storyID=8811159

Van Voorhis: Embryo Donation Worthwhile (Washington Post, June 16)
Some couples are donating their frozen embryos to other couples in what they are calling a new form of adoption, while others advocate donating excess embryos for stem cell research. Dr. BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the University of Iowa, said when the university in the late 1990s surveyed 365 couples about what they wanted to do with embryos that had been frozen for more than two years, about 44 percent wanted to continue storage. Among the remaining couples, 34 percent wanted to discard the embryos, 10 percent wanted to donate them for research and 12 percent wanted to donate them to other couples. Van Voorhis said he supports embryo donation but that it's not the only option. "In my mind, donation for research is a very worthwhile and viable option for the embryo as well," he said. He said he uses the term embryo donation rather than adoption, because adoption means home studies, physical screenings and counseling. Instead, the embryos are allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis, with childless couples getting additional preference. The word adoption also gives the impression that an embryo is a human being. "We're saying an embryo deserves great respect, but not the respect accorded actual persons," Van Voorhis said. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared June 16 on the websites of NEW YORK TIMES, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, SAN LUIS (Calif.) OBISPO TRIBUNE, SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, REDNOVA.com in Texas, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, PHILLY.com, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, PORTERVILLE (Calif.) RECORDER, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, TAHLEQUAH (Okla.) DAILY PRESS, TALLAHASSEE.com, RAPID CITY (S.D.) JOURNAL, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD, MUNSTER (Ind.) TIMES, PETOSKEY (Mich.) NEWS-REVIEW, COLUMBIA BASIN (Wash.) HERALD, AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL, BONNER COUNTY (Idaho) DAILY BEE, DAILY INTER LAKE in Montana, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL, WRAL-TV in North Carolina, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, the APPEAL-DEMOCRAT in California, BELOIT (Wis.) DAILY NEWS, NORTH COUNTY (Calif.) TIMES, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, KENTUCKY.com, MIAMI HERALD, WJLA in Washington, D.C., SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, ABERDEEN (S.D.) AMERICAN NEWS, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, WILKES BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER, KANSAS CITY STAR, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, MLIVE.com in Michigan, WTOP in Washington D.C., BALTIMORE SUN, and the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/16/AR2005061600174.html

Pincus: Stocks Fell On Bill Passage Fears (Wall Street Journal, June 16)
In his "Numbers Guy" column, Carl Bialik writes that companies have been complaining about the costs of complying with the Sarbanes-Oxley corporate-reform law since its passage in 2002. The outcry has intensified with the departure of Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman William Donaldson, as companies hope for new rules that might ease what they say is a financial burden. Putting a dollar figure on how much Sarbanes-Oxley has cost corporate America is extremely difficult, though that hasn't stopped many from trying. These studies use what's called event analysis -- attempting to isolate market movements around events believed to be driving investor gains or losses. In order to isolate the effect of Sarbanes-Oxley developments like votes in Congress and SEC rulemaking, researchers look at stock-market movements in the day before, of and after the events, and seek to exclude other potentially confounding factors, like major economic reports. In one unpublished work, University of Iowa accounting professor MORTON PINCUS argued that stocks fell because investors feared the bill wouldn't be passed, and not because of indications the bill would be passed and would be tougher than expected.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB111885041027560378,00.html

Writer Notes Barkan Expertise (New Vision.com, June 16)
An opinion writer argues that International Monetary Fund, World Bank and other foreign donor financial assistance to African countries was never, and still is not, given on the basis of sound economic policies or even genuine democratization principles. After independence, it was given on the basis of perceived capitalism ideology. Following the collapse of communism in 1990s, the IMF, World Bank funding is given on the basis of project trials which largely benefit expatriate staff and foreign multinational companies, academic researchers attached to leading universities in the US and Europe, such as Prof. JOEL BARKAN, department of political science, University of Iowa, and career advancement for the staff working in aid industry, mainly at the IMF and World Bank. The news web site is based in Uganda.
http://www.newvision.co.ug/D/8/20/439699

Alumnus Working In Digital Video (Portsmouth Herald, June 16)
The rise of digital technology has made capturing and using images more efficient. A feature film can be shot with a digital video camera and edited on a laptop for a fraction of the price of a 35-millimeter movie camera. Such efficiency gives companies more options for weaving such products as commercials, sales training videos and employee communications into their menu of offerings, and it has spawned numerous companies that can offer high production values at low cost. But the underlying principle governing what to capture and how to go about it has not changed, as two Seacoast-area film veterans can attest. You get what you pay for. "Digital video is all over the place, but outfits offering low prices might only give you a montage of images with no story line," says Jim Cooper, founder of Barrington-based Socratic Productions. Though best known for founding the computer-based training firm Teletutor, Jim Cooper's first love was film. He studied film at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and made many promotional and training films for the Illinois networking company Tellabs following a stint as a television cameraman. The newspaper is based in New Hampshire.
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/06162005/business/47895.htm

Weiler Comments On Exercise-Induced Asthma (Newsday, June 15)
So many people -- both recreational athletes and professionals -- are being diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma that the nation's largest group of athletic trainers has drawn up its first guidelines for dealing with the condition. The National Athletic Trainers' Association's asthma guidelines, released Tuesday during its annual meeting in Indianapolis, are aimed at familiarizing trainers, health professionals, parents and coaches with asthma's symptoms and treatments. JOHN WEILER, a professor emeritus of internal medicine at the University of Iowa who has studied exercise-induced asthma for more than 20 years, said many athletes keep their asthma secret, fearing it could hurt their chances of a professional career. "A guy who's played four years of football at state college and is looking at the NFL, it just isn't something he wants to (let) get out," he said. Versions of the story also ran on the Website of the NEW YORK TIMES, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, the ALLENTOWN (Penn.) MORNING CALL, WXXA-TV in New York, FORT WAYNE (Ind.) JOURNAL GAZETTE, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER-PRESS, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HEARLD, MIAMI HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE and many other media outlets.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/wire/sns-ap-fit-asthma-exercise,0,1481387.story?coll=sns-ap-health-headlines

Women With Support Better Equipped To Survive Cancer (Detroit News, June 15)
Women with ovarian cancer who have social support from loved ones have lower levels of an inflammatory protein released by the immune system, which could mean a more favorable prognosis, new research suggests. At high levels, the protein called interleukin-6, or IL-6, is linked with a poorer outcome for ovarian cancer patients, said ERIN COSTANZO, a graduate fellow in psychology at the University of Iowa. She is the lead author of the study, published in the July 15 issue of Cancer, which evaluated the IL-6 levels of 61 women with advanced ovarian cancer. "The closer the women's social attachment, the lower their IL-6, on a kind of continuum," Costanzo said. For the study, social attachment was defined as having at least one other person with whom you have a close connection in your life.
http://www.detnews.com/2005/fitness/0506/15/H07-215644.htm

Barkan Speaks On Tanzania, Debt Relief (Talk of the Nation, June 14)
Finance ministers from the group of wealthy nations known as the G8 have agreed to cancel $40 billion in debt held by 18 poor nations. The NPR call-in program focuses on debt through the lens of one country: the United Republic of Tanzania. This East African nation is rich in wildlife and spectacular scenery from Mt. Kilimanjaro to the beaches of Zanzibar. But Tanzania also remains one of the poorest and least developed countries in the world. After taking out billions of dollars loans, more than half the population lives on less than $2 a day. As in many poor countries, life expectancy is short. The AIDS rate and child mortality are high. Despite its poverty, Tanzania is often described as an African success story, a country that's worked hard to earn debt relief. JOEL BARKAN is familiar with Tanzania's progress. He is a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. He's consulted for the World Bank and the US Agency for International Development on governance projects in East Africa. Barkan points out some unique factors that have exacerbated the country's debt problem, including, "the vision of Julius Nyerere. While Nyerere himself was one of the most honest leaders of Africa, he was determined to create a socialist command economy in that country, and that resulted, among other things, with the emergence of some 400 public corporations during the 1960s and 1970s, of which only about a dozen or a dozen and a half ever made any profit, which became a tremendous drain on the state, which bloated the payrolls of these state-owned corporations and the civil service itself. So the hill that Tanzania had to climb in respect to reform was very great, and they resisted that until 1985 when Nyerere stepped down from his presidency." To listen to the program, go to
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4702980

To read a transcript, go to http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=745b4ab1ced4dcc1749c3b307ca5b6e9&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkVA&_md5=4eb56eba162e0233bf876b559716ce5e

Regents Postpone Decision On Mid-Year Tuition Hike (WQAD-TV, June 14)
The state Board of Regents will wait a month before discussing a midyear tuition increase at the three state universities. Board members meeting today in Council Bluffs didn't comment on the proposed three percent hike. They are scheduled to vote on the increase July 14. The board is being asked to increase tuition for the second semester of the upcoming school year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. The 3 percent hike amounts to $74 for undergraduates who are Iowa residents. That's on top of a 4 percent increase that takes effect in the fall. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3473987

Wing Discusses Palestinian Self-Determination (Middle East North Africa Financial Network, June 14)
Participants at a recent conference discussed Palestinian development up to and after possible statehood. Adequate state-building should first "decolonise" by developing the educational system and establishing industry and advanced agricultural systems. ADRIEN WING, a law professor at the University of Iowa and a presenter at the conference, thought discussing the technicalities of post-occupation laws was in fact a "form of concretising self-determination - and concretising issues that, one day, the state of Palestine will have to deal with." She recognised, however, that most of that discussion was "a theoretical exercise because the PA [Palestinian Authority] is not really in a position to do anything in a concrete way that we might suggest to them."
http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story_s.asp?StoryId=95676

Harty Comments on Booster Shots (Xagena, June 14)
Researchers at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine have discovered that a vaccination strategy, called dendritic cell vaccination, can dramatically speed up the immunization process by greatly reducing the required " lag time " between the initial vaccination and the booster shots. The finding has important implications for immunotherapy -- using vaccines to treat cancer -- where developing immunity fast is critical. In the study, mice treated with a dendritic cell vaccine and a booster shot were protected against a bacterial infection in a matter of days compared to the several weeks required by normal vaccination to generate immunity. The study results appeared in Nature Medicine. " People should not be concerned that vaccines don't work -- if you have plenty of time, current vaccine and booster regimens work very well," said JOHN HARTY, of the Carver College of Medicine, and senior author of the study. " But there are circumstances, such as using a vaccine to treat a fast-growing cancer, where the immune response might be needed much more rapidly. With the dendritic cell vaccinations, we really speed up the booster schedule and also speed up the time it takes to achieve protective immunity." Xagena is based in Italy.
http://www.xagena.it/news/medicinenews_net_news/77772713a7d7e02b10ca9bd90e4f6a31.html

Women With Social Support Are Better Equipped to Survive Cancer (KLAS-TV, June 14)
Women with ovarian cancer who have social support from loved ones have lower levels of an inflammatory protein released by the immune system, which could mean a more favorable prognosis, new research suggests. At high levels, the protein called interleukin-6, or IL-6, is linked with a poorer outcome for ovarian cancer patients, said ERIN COSTANZO, a graduate fellow in psychology at the University of Iowa. She is the lead author of the study, published in the July 15 issue of Cancer, which evaluated the IL-6 levels of 61 women with advanced ovarian cancer. "The closer the women's social attachment, the lower their IL-6, on a kind of continuum," Costanzo said. For the study, social attachment was defined as having at least one other person with whom you have a close connection in your life. KLAS is based in Las Vegas. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, WFIE-TV, KRON-TV, DRKOOP.com and FORBES.
http://www.klastv.com/Global/story.asp?S=3467437

Costanzo Study Finds Social Support Helps Cancer Victims (News-Medical.net, June 14)
A new study funded by the National Cancer Institute reports that social support and other behavioral factors are related to levels of a circulating protein, which at high levels is associated with a poor prognosis in advanced ovarian cancer. IL-6 has previously been shown to promote tumor growth, and IL-6 levels are also prognostic in ovarian cancer, with elevated levels associated with higher mortality and metastatic disease. Because depression and chronic stress are commonly associated with ovarian cancer, and IL-6 levels are responsive to psychosocial factors, ERIN S. COSTANZO, M.A. from the University of Iowa and colleagues investigated whether IL-6 levels were linked to psychosocial factors in 61 women with advanced ovarian cancer. The same story appeared on the Web sites of REDNOVA.com and HEALTHCENTRAL.com.
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=10949

Robinson Study Shows Affluent Are Getting Fat (East Valley Living, June 14)
Obesity has long been a problem mostly of the poor, but new research shows that the more affluent are catching up fast. The prevalence of obesity is growing three times faster among Americans who make more than $60,000 a year than it is among their low-income neighbors, said a study being presented Monday at a meeting of the American Heart Association. "This is a very surprising finding," said the lead researcher, Dr. JENNIFER ROBINSON of the University of Iowa. It's paradoxical, but for years doctors have known that the people most likely to be overweight have the lowest incomes. That's because fresh produce and other healthy fare are more expensive and less accessible in low-income neighborhoods than are fast food and other high-fat options. East Valley Living is based in Arizona.
http://www.evliving.com/drfittalks.php?action=fullnews&showcomments=1&id=3256

Columnist Cites Damasio Comment on Oxytocin (Talequah Daily Press, June 14)
A columnist writes a humor column based on recent research that shows oxytocin increases peoples' trust. "Might their high level of trust be due to excessive oxytocin release?" asks University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, who reviewed the experiments for Nature. "Little is known about the neurobiology of trust, although the phenomenon is beginning to attract attention." The Daily Press is based in Oklahoma.
http://www.tahlequahdailypress.com/articles/2005/06/13/news/top_stories/trust.txt

Folsom Comments On 150th Anniversary Of 'Leaves Of Grass' (Long Island Topic, June 13)
A story about plans to celebrate the 150th anniversary of poet Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" says that democracy in America Whitman's eyes would not be easy, but messy and cluttered, like the images of the world revealed by that recent invention, photography. Unlike painting, photography presented the world for the first time with all its clutter, every detail demanding to be recognized. It was, Whitman said, the new democratic art form, revealing that true beauty was inclusiveness. ED FOLSOM, who teaches American literature at the University of Iowa and edits the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, has written several books on Whitman. Folsom said Whitman believed that photography inaugurated a new democratic way of seeing the world. One of the reasons was that photography democratized the art of portraiture. During Whitman's lifetime an era of expensive painted portraits gave way to an era of cheap, easily available photographic portraits. Suddenly, images of the self that had only been available to the privileged classes were available to everyone. This article is not available online.

MFA Student Co-Directing Play In West Bank (San Luis Obispo Tribune, June 13)
When Kevin Harris was producing theater in San Luis Obispo, he faced a little traffic on Highway 101 getting from his Arroyo Grande home to the theater. Today, his daily journey to rehearsal takes him through three Israeli checkpoints and occasional gunfire. The Arroyo Grande native, formerly an artistic and executive director of Centerpoint Theatre Group, is co-directing an original play about terrorism at Ashtar Theatre in Ramallah, West Bank. After just a few weeks, he says the experience is challenging his view of Middle East politics, life in America and the role of theater. Being in the midst of the conflict has been a shock for Harris, who ran Centerpoint until it closed in 2002. He is now pursuing a master of fine arts degree in directing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he met Ashtar co-founder Iman Auon, who visited the university as a guest artist. She invited Harris and playwrighting student Sam Hunter to the West Bank for six weeks. Founded in 1991, Ashtar is funded by donors in Israel and the West Bank, as well as organizations and companies throughout Europe and the United States. U.S. donors include the Ford and Rockefeller foundations and the Methodist Church. The paper is based in California.
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/mld/sanluisobispo/news/11883211.htm

Skorton, Kearney Speak Out On Spence Break-In (Kansas City Star, June 13)
Several University of Iowa officials and a recent graduate are quoted in an article about last November's break-in of Spence Laboratories and release of hundreds of research rats and mice. "All the people who work in animal labs are now worried about the security of their labs and of themselves and their families," said JOSEPH KEARNEY, the associate dean for research at the University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "The actions of some of these groups who target our researchers and our facilities are no longer a nuisance," he said. "It is no longer vandalism. It is terrorism." Leana Stormont is the face and voice of the push to stop animal experimentation at the University of Iowa. She is the head of the Iowa Law Student Animal Legal Defense Fund and just graduated from Iowa's law school. She has taken a job in the legal department of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, or PETA. "I wonder how many cures we've thrown away because it didn't work on a mouse," she said. "The thing is, it doesn't have to work on a mouse. It has to work on a human." But DAVID SKORTON, the president of the University of Iowa and a cardiologist who once did congenital heart disease research on animals, disagrees adamantly. "I refuse to let them elevate what they have done to the level of `civil disobedience,'" he said. "It's violence and it's illegal. I don't think many people can understand how tough it is to be targeted, to feel your safety and your family's safety targeted on a national level, for the important scientific work you are doing." Versions of the story also ran on the Websites of the KANSAS CITY STAR, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, MONTEREY (Calif.) COUNTY HERALD, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH and many other media outlets.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0506090213jun09,1,1064633.story

Former UI President Rawlings Takes Helm At Cornell (Ithaca Journal, June 13)
President Jeffrey S. Lehman's resignation will send Cornell University back to the future, at least for now. Hunter R. Rawlings III, who served as the university's 10th president, from 1995 to 2003, has agreed to serve as interim leader until the university names a successor to Lehman. Academic administration has been a significant part of Rawlings' career, going well back beyond his Cornell days. He was UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president and professor of classics from 1988 to 1995; University of Colorado vice president for academic affairs and research, and graduate school dean, from 1984 to 1988; and University of Colorado at Boulder professor of classics, department chair and associate vice chancellor for instruction from 1970 to 1984.
http://www.theithacajournal.com/news/stories/20050613/localnews/2158091.html

Sanborn Attended UI (The Messenger, June 13)
Polio and jazz are uncommon bed fellows, but if it hadn't been for that childhood illness, the world might have never known David Sanborn. An award wining saxophonist, Sanborn is the latest in a long line of world renowned jazz musicians to play at the Annual Jazz Festival in Tbilisi. Sanborn, 60, suffered from polio when he was a young child in St. Louis, Missouri. As part of his physical therapy his doctors recommended he learn a wind instrument and, after hours of listening to jazz on the radio, the alto saxophone was a natural choice. After studying at Northwestern University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a friend encouraged him to travel to San Francisco. There he joined The Paul Butterfield Band, and the rest, as they say, is jazz history. The paper is an English language publication in the Republic of Georgia.
http://www.messenger.com.ge/issues/0880_june_13_2005/events_0880_2.htm

Costanzo Find Social Support, Protein Link (Medical News Today, June 13)
A new study funded by the National Cancer Institute reports that social support and other behavioral factors are related to levels of a circulating protein, which at high levels is associated with a poor prognosis in advanced ovarian cancer. The study, published in the July 15, 2005 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, reports that factors that improved quality life, such as social support, were associated with low levels of a protein released by both immune cells and tumor cells, called interleukin 6 (IL-6). In contrast, negative quality of life factors were associated with higher IL-6 levels. The study is the first to find this association both in the peripheral blood and in the vicinity of the tumor. IL-6 is an inflammatory cytokine that in healthy young people is almost undetectable. Levels of IL-6 increase with age, chronic psychological stress, and disease. Previous studies in humans and laboratory animals have shown IL-6 levels are also influenced by behavioral factors. IL-6 has previously been shown to promote tumor growth, and IL-6 levels are also prognostic in ovarian cancer, with elevated levels associated with higher mortality and metastatic disease. Because depression and chronic stress are commonly associated with ovarian cancer, and IL-6 levels are responsive to psychosocial factors, ERIN S. COSTANZO, M.A. from the University of Iowa and colleagues investigated whether IL-6 levels were linked to psychosocial factors in 61 women with advanced ovarian cancer. The publication is based in the U.K.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=26035

UI’s Fame As Writing Epicenter Explored (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 12)
Flannery O'Connor famously honed her literary voice here, and aspiring writers have been traveling to this university town ever since. From the Prairie Lights Bookstore to the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, Iowa City has a bookish vibe that makes you feel like a writer even if your novel is stuffed in a desk drawer. But this city of 62,000 is much more. It's picture-postcard farmhouses and cornfields amid a well-educated population and a bustling arts scene. It's home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and one in four adults has an advanced degree. It's a serene, pretty place to escape the glow of the computer screen and rush-hour traffic. Walk, read, have a picnic, think and banter with friendly locals. Every summer, aspiring writers make a pilgrimage to Iowa City for the Iowa Summer Writing Festival, a series of weeklong and weekend writing courses held at the university. … Explore the sprawling and shady university campus, anchored by the Old Capitol (Iowa City was once the state capital). Check out the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART, known for modern and African art, and MACBRIDE HALL, where a natural history museum features stuffed mammals and birds.
http://www.ajc.com/search/content/auto/epaper/editions/yesterday/travel_24bab083070c308c0090.html

Inspiration For Patient Center Came From UI (Washington Times, June 12)
A unique program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, the Center for Shared Decision Making, helps patients make better, wiser and potentially less-costly choices about their treatment by involving them more actively in their health care decisions. Dr. James Weinstein, the center's medical director, hopes it will move medicine beyond informed consent to informed choice. His interest was sparked a decade ago when he participated in a research project at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The orthopedic surgeon was surprised to see that some surgery rates fell by 30 percent when patients were given more information about their choices.
http://washingtontimes.com/culture/20050612-104947-8512r.htm

IEM Cited In Story On Predicting Markets (Business Week, June 12)
Corporate planners are starting to use the wisdom of online crowds to predict the future, forecasting profits and sales more precisely. Prediction markets let people essentially buy shares in various forecasts, often with real money. Most famously, they've been employed in the University of Iowa's experimental IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS to determine, with remarkable accuracy, the most likely winner of the Presidential election.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_25/b3938601.htm

UI Hospitals Treats Men Hurt In Brawl (WQAD-TV, June 12)
Davenport police spent the early morning hours Saturday breaking up some nasty fights in the city's downtown. One of the fights sent two men to the hospital with serious injuries. The first clash occurred behind the Schricker Apartments on W. 4th Street. Then, around 3 a.m. there were more reports of fighting on W. 3rd and W. 2nd Streets. Witnesses say bats and hammers were used in one of the fights. Late Saturday afternoon, police were still searching for evidence at one of the scenes. One of the two men taken to the hospital was injured so severely he had to be transported to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3464417&nav=1sW7awnU

Folsom Comments On 150th Anniversary Of 'Leaves Of Grass' (Newsday, June 12)
A story about plans to celebrate the 150th anniversary of poet Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" says that democracy in America Whitman's eyes would not be easy, but messy and cluttered, like the images of the world revealed by that recent invention, photography. Unlike painting, photography presented the world for the first time with all its clutter, every detail demanding to be recognized. It was, Whitman said, the new democratic art form, revealing that true beauty was inclusiveness. ED FOLSOM, who teaches American literature at the University of Iowa and edits the Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, has written several books on Whitman. Folsom said Whitman believed that photography inaugurated a new democratic way of seeing the world. One of the reasons was that photography democratized the art of portraiture. During Whitman's lifetime an era of expensive painted portraits gave way to an era of cheap, easily available photographic portraits. Suddenly, images of the self that had only been available to the privileged classes were available to everyone.
http://www.newsday.com/news/opinion/ny-opfol124299604jun12,0,6337397.story?coll=ny-entertainment-headlines&track=mostemailedlink

UI Carver College Of Medicine Studies TM (Seattle Times, June 12)
Practicing Transcendental Meditation - a technique involving intense breathing exercises and the repetition of words, or "mantras" - may have benefits beyond stress reduction. It might actually help you live longer. Researchers at five universities and medical centers including the Medical College of Georgia and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE tracked 202 patients with high blood pressure for up to 18 years. They found that participants who used Transcendental Meditation twice a day for 20 minutes had a 23 percent lower death rate from all causes and nearly a third lower death rate from heart disease than those who did not practice the form of meditation.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2002324860_healthvitals12.html

Actor Wilder Attended UI (The Times, June 12)
A review of Gene Wilder's autobiography, "Kiss Me Like a Stranger: My Search for Love and Art," says that as a drama student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Wilder learned how to win applause from the likes of Lee Strasberg, but as soon as he graduated he booked a passage to England - to broaden his studies at the Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol. The paper is based in London.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2102-1645358,00.html

Hearing Set On Herbarium's Fate (WQAD-TV, June 11)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University are locked in a legal battle over a plant specimen collection and the case is scheduled to go to trial on Monday. A 250,000-specimen collection has been housed at the University of Iowa for 135 years. Talks began in 1998 to merge Iowa's collection with the one at Iowa State University to save money. The collection was transferred to Ames from Iowa City in 2004. Now, University of Iowa faculty, students and a group called Friends of the University of Iowa Herbarium, are pursuing a lawsuit to return the plant collection to Iowa City. Supporters say a herbarium is an essential part of a liberal arts education. Iowa State has its own collection with 420,000 plant specimens. The case is scheduled to be heard before Judge Amanda Potterfield on Monday in Johnson County District Court in Iowa City.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3462084

Dunbar Comments on Iowa Test Scoring Change (Chicago Sun Times, June 10)
Chicago's eighth-grade reading scores plummeted an eye-popping 13 percentage points on average this year -- until Chicago school officials asked experts with the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills to double-check the numbers. The inquiry prompted Iowa test experts to catch a scoring glitch that had slightly depressed seventh-grade reading scores and dramatically depressed eighth-grade ones this year, Iowa officials said. After an adjustment, system-wide Iowa reading scores were up by nearly a percentage point, rather than down one full percentage point, and eighth-grade reading scores were down 0.3 percentage points, rather than down 13 percentage points. Small adjustments also helped seventh- and eighth-grade math scores. Every scoring adjustment inserts a margin of error into tests, prompting some critics to question if this year's reading gains could be believed. At this point, said Julie Woestehoff of Parents United for Responsible Education, "The scores are meaningless. If you put them through a sort of Rube Goldberg machine, then you're not coming out with anything that means anything.'' But University of Iowa Professor STEVE DUNBAR, a creator of the test, said not making the final adjustment would have inserted a bigger "error" into the results, one of "systematic bias.'' Dunbar said the initial scoring drop was linked to Chicago's decision to give an old form of the test. Chicago was the only client in the nation to veer from Iowas' two new forms and opt instead for an old one, Dunbar said.  The old test was harder for some kids, Dunbar said, because it asked them to read eight passages in one sitting.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/education/cst-nws-scores09.html

Skorton, Kearney Comment On ALF Break-in (Fort Lauderdale Sun Sentinel, June 10)
The November break-in at the University of Iowa's Spence Laboratories -- an act for which there have been no arrests but for which the group Animal Liberation Front, or ALF, has claimed responsibility -- is characterized by university and law-enforcement officials as terrorism. The incident has made the University of Iowa, a school in the heart of one of America's most farm-centered, meat-producing states, ground zero in a national battleground over animal-based research at taxpayer-funded institutions. Animal research labs have been targeted at the University of Minnesota, the University of California, San Francisco, Western Washington University and Louisiana State University. And last month in Washington, John Lewis, the FBI's deputy assistant director for counterterrorism, told a Senate committee that animal-rights and environmental activists resorting to arson and explosives are the nation's top domestic terrorism threat. In Iowa City, the break-in has unnerved the research community. "All the people who work in animal labs are now worried about the security of their labs and of themselves and their families," said JOSEPH KEARNEY, the associate dean for research at the University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "The actions of some of these groups who target our researchers and our facilities are no longer a nuisance. It is no longer vandalism. It is terrorism." Animal research critic and recent UI law graduate Leana Stormont argues passionately that most animal experimentation is senseless. She says that with the advance of sophisticated computer modeling able to mimic lab testing, it is no longer necessary to use animals in most cases. And she argues that some of the most effective drugs--aspirin and penicillin--were once almost scrapped because animals did not respond well to them. "I wonder how many cures we've thrown away because it didn't work on a mouse," she said. "The thing is, it doesn't have to work on a mouse. It has to work on a human." But DAVID SKORTON, the president of the University of Iowa and a cardiologist who once did congenital heart disease research on animals, disagrees adamantly. He pointed out that some primates share up to 98 percent of the human genome. And 90 percent of the genes linked to diseases are the same in mice as in humans. Experiments on mice have served as the foundation for some of medicine's most crucial discoveries, such as the understanding of cancer cells, he argues. Skorton, a vegetarian who has advocated that scientists experiment on rats and mice whenever possible to spare monkeys, dogs, cats, pigs and other kinds of research subjects, resents the tactics that such groups as the ALF have used against universities. "I refuse to let them elevate what they have done to the level of `civil disobedience,'" he said. "It's violence and it's illegal. I don't think many people can understand how tough it is to be targeted, to feel your safety and your family's safety targeted on a national level, for the important scientific work you are doing." The same story appeared on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/features/health/chi-0506090213jun09,0,3231892.story?coll=sfla-news-health

Winfield Served as Surgeon's Mentor (Morris Daily Herald, June 10)
Dr. Thai T. Nguyen, a urologist at Provena Saint Joseph Medical Center in Joliet, is providing a less invasive option for patients undergoing surgical removal of the prostate for the treatment of prostate cancer. The procedure, called laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP), involves removal of the entire prostate through five tiny incisions in the lower abdomen, each approximately 1 centimeter in length. The alternative "open" procedure involves a four- to seven-inch abdominal incision. LRP is more difficult to perform than open surgery and requires specialized training on the part of the surgeon. During his fellowship in laparoscopic surgery at the University of Iowa, Dr. Nguyen completed 145 laparoscopic surgical cases under the mentorship of HOWARD WINFIELD, M.D., one of the pioneers of urologic laparoscopic surgery. The Daily Herald is based in Morris, Ill.
http://www.morrisdailyherald.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=58&ArticleID=14290&TM=46066.49

UI Wal Mart Study Cited (Pittsburgh Tribune Review, June 10)
A study conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that examined the impact of Wal-Mart on the Iowa economy is cited in a story about a controversial new Wal-Mart in Pennsylvania.
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/trib/newssummary/s_342607.html

Alumnus Fixes Florida Roads (Sarasota Herald Tribune, June 10)
Before turning onto Eagle Pass Street, Branford Adumuah steps on the brake and tightly grips the steering wheel. He knows to go slowly on the road ahead, where the asphalt top has worn away, leaving only cement pocketed with deep holes. Adumuah, the city's assistant public works director, has seen roads this bad before. But that was in Ghana, where Adumuah grew up. "This is America," Adumuah said. "... There are the tools and the means and the know-how here to do it better." Adumuah came to the United States 17 years ago to study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050609/BREAKING/50609016

Skorton Subject Of Feature Article (Chronicle, June 10)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
President David Skorton is the subject of an in-depth feature article. Among other things, the article says that "unlike most academics who give up their day jobs when they become college presidents, Dr. Skorton, 55, kept his when he took the reins at Iowa two years ago. A cardiologist by training, he still sees patients with congenital heart disease and genetic disorders twice a month in a university clinic and makes time to take their telephone calls. Even while serving as president, he holds academic appointments in internal medicine, electrical and computer engineering, and biomedical engineering. And despite that background, he actively promotes the arts and humanities."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i40/40a01801.htm

Skorton, Kearney Comment On ALF Break-in (Chicago Tribune, June 9)
The November break-in at the University of Iowa's Spence Laboratories -- an act for which there have been no arrests but for which the group Animal Liberation Front, or ALF, has claimed responsibility -- is characterized by university and law-enforcement officials as terrorism. The incident has made the University of Iowa, a school in the heart of one of America's most farm-centered, meat-producing states, ground zero in a national battleground over animal-based research at taxpayer-funded institutions. Animal research labs have been targeted at the University of Minnesota, the University of California, San Francisco, Western Washington University and Louisiana State University. And last month in Washington, John Lewis, the FBI's deputy assistant director for counterterrorism, told a Senate committee that animal-rights and environmental activists resorting to arson and explosives are the nation's top domestic terrorism threat. In Iowa City, the break-in has unnerved the research community. "All the people who work in animal labs are now worried about the security of their labs and of themselves and their families," said JOSEPH KEARNEY, the associate dean for research at the University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. "The actions of some of these groups who target our researchers and our facilities are no longer a nuisance. It is no longer vandalism. It is terrorism." Animal research critic and recent UI law graduate Leana Stormont argues passionately that most animal experimentation is senseless. She says that with the advance of sophisticated computer modeling able to mimic lab testing, it is no longer necessary to use animals in most cases. And she argues that some of the most effective drugs--aspirin and penicillin--were once almost scrapped because animals did not respond well to them. "I wonder how many cures we've thrown away because it didn't work on a mouse," she said. "The thing is, it doesn't have to work on a mouse. It has to work on a human." But DAVID SKORTON, the president of the University of Iowa and a cardiologist who once did congenital heart disease research on animals, disagrees adamantly. He pointed out that some primates share up to 98 percent of the human genome. And 90 percent of the genes linked to diseases are the same in mice as in humans. Experiments on mice have served as the foundation for some of medicine's most crucial discoveries, such as the understanding of cancer cells, he argues. Skorton, a vegetarian who has advocated that scientists experiment on rats and mice whenever possible to spare monkeys, dogs, cats, pigs and other kinds of research subjects, resents the tactics that such groups as the ALF have used against universities. "I refuse to let them elevate what they have done to the level of `civil disobedience,'" he said. "It's violence and it's illegal. I don't think many people can understand how tough it is to be targeted, to feel your safety and your family's safety targeted on a national level, for the important scientific work you are doing." This story also appeared June 9 on the websites of NEWSDAY in New York and the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0506090213jun09,1,1064633.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Dunbar Explains ITBS Scoring Adjustment (Chicago Sun-Times, June 9)
Chicago's eighth-grade reading scores plummeted an eye-popping 13 percentage points on average this year -- until Chicago school officials asked experts with the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills to double-check the numbers. The inquiry from Dan Bugler, the CPS accountability chief prompted Iowa test experts to catch a scoring glitch that had slightly depressed seventh-grade reading scores and dramatically depressed eighth-grade ones this year, Iowa officials said. After an adjustment, system-wide Iowa reading scores were up by nearly a percentage point, rather than down one full percentage point, and eighth-grade reading scores were down 0.3 percentage points, rather than down 13 percentage points. Small adjustments also helped seventh- and eighth-grade math scores. Every scoring adjustment inserts a margin of error into tests, prompting some critics to question if this year's reading gains could be believed. But University of Iowa Professor STEVE DUNBAR, a creator of the test, said not making the final adjustment would have inserted a bigger "error" into the results, one of "systematic bias." Dunbar said the initial scoring drop was linked to Chicago's decision to give an old form of the test. Chicago was the only client in the nation to veer from Iowa's two new forms and opt instead for an old one, Dunbar said. The old test was harder for some kids, Dunbar said, because it asked them to read eight passages in one sitting. The new test divided the passages over two sittings.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/education/cst-nws-scores09.html

Johnson: Attendance Figures Unrealistic (Naples Daily News, June 9)
In the next few years, the city of Coralville, Iowa, could become the home of the world's largest enclosed rainforest, spread over 4.5 acres and soaring nearly 20 stories high, with a curving translucent dome designed to shed snow and walls built to withstand tornadoes. It would look like a giant caterpillar. And the bold vision behind it is being billed as Iowa's salvation. Some of the state's most prominent civic and political leaders are backing the project, which has received $50 million in federal funding. Iowa, they say, can no longer count on cornfields to power its economy and keep young residents from leaving. It needs tour buses. But questions still surround the project, which has been in the works for years but not yet broken ground. Debate about it is flaring up because the nonprofit foundation preparing to build the rainforest is now asking the state for $20 million. Some skeptics contend that expense would be risky, even foolish, for Iowa. They say an out-of-place ecosystem is unlikely to beckon big crowds from the Midwest and beyond to Coralville, especially in winter. "Iowa has gotten too caught up in the 'Field of Dreams' movie -- that 'if you build it, they will come' mentality," said NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a University of Iowa law professor who has questioned the project. "The attendance projections are totally unrealistic. Coralville ain't Las Vegas." The story also mentions that the rainforest is located near the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.naplesnews.com/npdn/neapolitan/article/0,2071,NPDN_14939_3840039,00.html

UI Graduate Student Studies Washington Fiction (USA Today, June 9)
The capital of chick lit, Washington is not. There are shelves of Washington satires, histories and mysteries. There are classic "Washington novels," such as Allen Drury's Advise and Consent. But hardly any contemporary romance or women's fiction is set here. It wasn't always so. "A century ago, chick novels set in Washington were all the rage," says Jeffrey Charis-Carlson, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA doctoral candidate studying Washington fiction. They typically featured "young plucky girls" coming here to be clerks, he says, and "finally finding that well-connected Washingtonian to lift them out of their clerical lives."
http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/news/2005-06-08-chick-lit-dc_x.htm

UI Recent Co-Host Of Math Meet (Allentown Morning Call, June 8)
A group of high school students from the Lehigh Valley became national champs at the American Regions Mathematics League contest held Saturday at Penn State University. The contest is held simultaneously at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and San Jose State University, and the Lehigh Valley team came in first out of 91 teams nationwide. The paper is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.mcall.com/news/local/all-b5_4mathjun08,0,1248677.story?coll=all-newslocal-hed

UI Alumna Co-Authors 'Women in Pants' (Detroit Metro Times, June 8)
Fine art photographer Cynthia Greig and artist Catherine Smith collaborated on the book "Women in Pants: Manly Maidens, Cowgirls and Other Renegades," in which the pair deal with the dress reformation of the 1850s through the 1920s, unraveling a tidy thread of narrative order and exposing reformation as something not always politically motivated. Greig's interest in old photos began as a hobby, about 10 years ago. As an art history grad student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she went antiquing in neighboring small towns. One of the first photos she found featured a woman whose face is in shadow, and a young child with a pained expression. "It sort of told a story for me, but because it was removed from any context or documentation, and the people were gone, it raised more questions and spoke to me." Greig sought more photos of women and children. She was really interested in the untold story, the pictures' subjects' relationships with each other and the intimate gestures between them.
http://www.metrotimes.com/editorial/story.asp?id=7799

Des Moines Hygienic Lab Housed In New Complex (WQAD-TV, June 8)
A new lab complex that combines four state agencies will help make the state a safer place to live, state officials said Tuesday outside the sprawling $52 million building. The complex, located on the Des Moines Area Community College campus, houses a new state medical examiner's laboratory, the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation lab, a central Iowa branch of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB and the Iowa Department of Agriculture Lab. The medical examiner's office, once housed in a room at Broadlawn's Medical Center, has more room for autopsies and storage. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3445253

UI, Other Regents Universities Seek Tuition Increase (WQAD-TV, June 8)
Iowa's three state universities are asking the Board of Regents to increase tuition by another 3 percent for the second semester of the 2005-06 school year. The board will discuss the proposal when it meets in Council Bluffs next Monday and Tuesday. It would add $74 to the tuition paid by in-state undergraduates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa for the second semester. The request follows a 4 percent tuition hike for the 2005-06 school year that had been approved earlier. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3444512

Johnson: Attendance Figures Unrealistic (Knoxville News Sentinel, June 7)
In the next few years, the city of Coralville, Iowa, could become the home of the world's largest enclosed rainforest, spread over 4.5 acres and soaring nearly 20 stories high, with a curving translucent dome designed to shed snow and walls built to withstand tornadoes. It would look like a giant caterpillar. And the bold vision behind it is being billed as Iowa's salvation. Some of the state's most prominent civic and political leaders are backing the project, which has received $50 million in federal funding. Iowa, they say, can no longer count on cornfields to power its economy and keep young residents from leaving. It needs tour buses. But questions still surround the project, which has been in the works for years but not yet broken ground. Debate about it is flaring up because the nonprofit foundation preparing to build the rainforest is now asking the state for $20 million. Some skeptics contend that expense would be risky, even foolish, for Iowa. They say an out-of-place ecosystem is unlikely to beckon big crowds from the Midwest and beyond to Coralville, especially in winter. "Iowa has gotten too caught up in the 'Field of Dreams' movie -- that 'if you build it, they will come' mentality," said NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a University of Iowa law professor who has questioned the project. "The attendance projections are totally unrealistic. Coralville ain't Las Vegas." The story also mentions that the rainforest is located near the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Tennessee.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/national/article/0,1406,KNS_350_3836529,00.html

Barkan Warns Against Third Term For Uganda President (Allafrica.com, June 7)
Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has again come under attack from the international community for his quest of a third term in office. They argue that this could "open a door to another dark and negative period in Uganda." The former U.S. ambassador to Uganda and Kenya, Johnnie Carson, criticized Museveni as a would-be despot whose current policies are undermining his past accomplishments. Carson and JOEL BARKAN, an Africanist at the University of Iowa in the United States, said Museveni is in danger of destroying the positive legacy of his rule. The two were key speakers at a forum in Washington D.C. on June 2 co-sponsored by the U.S. government's Woodrow Wilson Centre for International Scholars and the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Barkan, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa and a consultant to the World Bank on East Africa, argued in a report titled "The Political Economy of Uganda: The Art of Managing a Donor-Financed Neo-Patrimonial State" that Uganda could be plunged into civil war if Museveni insists on a third term.
http://allafrica.com/stories/200506070199.html

Hunsicker Questions Drug Safety Study (Reuters, June 7)
A U.S. health advisory panel on Monday was divided over whether Chiron Corp. provided enough data to prove its experimental lung transplant drug Pulminiq helped prevent organ rejection, even though most said the drug appeared to be safe. Some experts said it was not clear how well the drug worked and that recommending approval was too risky. "This is a small study, so flukes are more possible," said LAWRENCE HUNSICKER of the University of Iowa.
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N06227504.htm

Damasio: Advertising, Oxytocin Create Similar Effects (Insight, June 7)
People are more likely to trust their money to someone else if they sniff oxytocin, a brain chemical nicknamed the "love hormone," Swiss researchers say. The naturally occurring compound, triggered by a number of stimuli that include sex and breastfeeding, is known as being important to forming social and romantic ties. Thirteen of 29 people who inhaled oxytocin handed over all of their cash to their human trustee vs. just six of 29 who inhaled a placebo. However, the effect disappeared when the human was replaced with a random number generator. Could unscrupulous stores pump the air full of oxytocin to boost sales?  Perhaps, said University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, but advertising already uses tricks to get people to trust a brand that probably work "exactly the same way."
http://www.insightmag.com/media/paper441/news/2005/06/06/Features/Watercooler.Stories-955693.shtml

Alumnus Discusses South Korean Stem Cell Production (Detroit Free Press, June 7)
An interview with Dr. Wise Young, a Rutgers University medical professor and leading spinal cord injury researcher, on the significance of stem cell production in South Korea. Young has a doctorate in physiology and biophysics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.freep.com/news/health/spinalcord7e_20050607.htm

Alumnus Named Corporation Vice President (Autochannel, June 7)
ADESA, Inc. today announced it has promoted Brent J. Huisman to vice president of dealer affairs for ADESA Corporation, the company's auction and related services business. Huisman is currently an Executive Director of Sales for ADESA, based in Phoenix, Ariz. Huisman is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2005/06/06/115388.html

No Shame Theater Profiled (The State, June 6)
A profile of No Shame Theater and one of its co-founders, Todd Ristau. Ristau founded the theater franchise while a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The State is based in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/11824648.htm

Baldus: Hearing In Death Penalty Case Significant (Baltimore Sun, June 6)
Lawyers for a death row inmate are to present this week the first oral arguments before the state's high court using a state-sponsored study to try to show that Maryland's application of the death penalty is racially biased. Wesley Eugene Baker's case is one of at least five in which the issue has been raised since the University of Maryland study by Professor Raymond Paternoster was released in January 2003 but is the first to earn a spot on the docket of the Court of Appeals. Nearly two decades after the U.S. Supreme Court knocked down a race-based death penalty challenge that relied on a statistical analysis, the mere granting of a hearing based on Paternoster's report is significant, said DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who has written several death penalty analyses, including one in Maryland in 2001. Several states and organizations have commissioned similar studies, and Kentucky officials passed legislation in 1998 that allowed defendants to explore before trial whether race was a factor in the decision to seek the death penalty. But challenges based on statistical analyses are usually rebuffed before the courts ever reach the meat of the argument, Baldus said. "People say, the Supreme Court says there's no problem, so therefore, there's no problem," Baldus said. "Getting to a hearing is a major enterprise." The publication is based in Maryland.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bal-te.md.death06jun06,1,1852354.story?coll=bal-local-headlines

Iranian Movie Theater Chain CEO Attended UI (Palm Beach Post, June 6)
A feature on Iran-born Hamid Hashemi, chief executive of the Fort Lauderdale-based Muvico theater chain, says he arrived in the United States in 1978 as a Western-minded medical student with $700 in his pockets. He was among the last to flee Iran before Ayatollah Khomeini took over and established a new government rooted in Islamic fundamentalism. At first, he went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to be with his brother, also a student. But then he moved to Fort Lauderdale to study at FAU's main campus in Boca Raton. The paper is based in Florida.
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/state/content/state/epaper/2005/06/06/m1a_hashemi_0606.html

UI Host Of American Regions Math League Meet (St. Cloud Times, June 6)
Jean Huang has another addition to her trophy case. The Technical High School student was a member of the Minnesota team that was one of six site winners in this weekend's American Regions Math League competition. The 30th annual competition took place at three sites, Pennsylvania State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City and San Jose State University in California. Teams of 15 students competed in two divisions. The paper is based in Minnesota.
http://miva.sctimes.com/miva/cgi-bin/miva?Web/page.mv+1+local+586387

Successful Computer Salesman Studied French At UI (Chicago Tribune, June 5)
A feature about the success of CDW Corp., a seller of computer products that perennially makes the lists of best places to work while pleasing investors, says that supervisors coach new account managers using computer printouts that detail every aspect of their performance daily, from how many calls they made to how many "hits" they drove to CDW's Web pages. Even veterans aren't exempt from scrutiny. Their customer satisfaction rankings are posted in large numerals outside their cubicles. "87.9 percent of our customers rated Garth Huckabay `excellent,'" states the sign on Huckabay's workspace. Huckabay, 35, works out at CDW's subsidized fitness club at 6 a.m. before starting his 10-hour day around 7 a.m. A framed picture of his three kids sits on his desk near a box of green tea and a book on Judo. People choose their hours, but "they like us to be here selling a good nine hours a day," he said. The Chicago native majored in French at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and worked as a restaurant manager in Seattle before joining CDW.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0506050155jun05,1,6621135.story?coll=chi-business-hed

Johnson On Rainforest: 'Coralville No Vegas' (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, June 5)
In the next few years, the city of Coralville, Iowa, could become the home of the world's largest enclosed rainforest, spread over 4.5 acres and soaring nearly 20 stories high, with a curving translucent dome designed to shed snow and walls built to withstand tornadoes. It would look like a giant caterpillar. And the bold vision behind it is being billed as Iowa's salvation. Some of the state's most prominent civic and political leaders are backing the project, which has received $50 million in federal funding. Iowa, they say, can no longer count on cornfields to power its economy and keep young residents from leaving. It needs tour buses. But questions still surround the project, which has been in the works for years but not yet broken ground. Debate about it is flaring up because the nonprofit foundation preparing to build the rainforest is now asking the state for $20 million. Some skeptics contend that expense would be risky, even foolish, for Iowa. They say an out-of-place ecosystem is unlikely to beckon big crowds from the Midwest and beyond to Coralville, especially in winter. "Iowa has gotten too caught up in the 'Field of Dreams' movie -- that 'if you build it, they will come' mentality," said NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a University of Iowa law professor who has questioned the project. "The attendance projections are totally unrealistic. Coralville ain't Las Vegas." The story also mentions that the rainforest is located near the University of Iowa.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/5438962.html

Damasio Comments On Hormone Oxytocin (Columbia Daily Tribune, June 5)
It sounds like the plot for another Batman sequel: The villain sprays Gotham City with a trust hormone and people rush to give him all their money. Banks, the stock market and even governments collapse. Farfetched? Swiss and American scientists demonstrate in new experiments how a squirt of the hormone oxytocin stimulates trusting behavior in humans, and they acknowledge that the possibility of abuse can't be ignored. Other scientists say the new research raises important questions about oxytocin's potential as a therapy for conditions like autism, in which trust is diminished. Or, perhaps the hormone's activity could be reduced to treat more rare diseases, like Williams syndrome, in which children approach strangers fearlessly. "Might their high level of trust be due to excessive oxytocin release?" asks University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, who reviewed the experiments for Nature. "Little is known about the neurobiology of trust, although the phenomenon is beginning to attract attention." Versions of this Associated Press article appeared. The paper is based in Missouri.
http://www.columbiatribune.com/2005/Jun/20050605News010.asp

UI-Trained Doctor Treating East Timorans (New York Times, June 4)
Dr. Dan Murphy, a '60s radical now turned 60, came from Iowa to East Timor in 1998 to make a difference caring for the sick. When he first arrived, East Timor's struggle for independence from Indonesia was entering its final convulsive months. He immediately began risking his life to help the rebels, hiking into the mountains to treat gunshots and machete wounds, and sheltering the wounded at a local clinic. As soon as the Indonesian soldiers left, in September 1999, he founded the bare-bones Bairo Pite Clinic where he works today, offering free medical care, supported by a thin patchwork of donations for work that is not being done by international aid groups. As a young man, he was a rebel like many in the Vietnam generation. After graduating from medical school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, he refused the military draft. A judge gave him a suspended sentence and he went to work as a doctor, for seven years, with Cesar Chavez, the Mexican-American farm labor leader, and Mr. Chavez's farm workers in California. He then made his way to Mozambique for three years, where the violence was a foreshadowing of his experience in East Timor. At home again in Iowa, he opened a private practice that included a methadone clinic serving mostly immigrants at a meatpacking plant. The article originally appeared in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/04/international/asia/04murphy.html

Damasio Comments On Oxytocin Research (CNET, June 3)
How do you know whether to trust someone else? Yes, your sound judgment helps. But according to a team of Swiss-led researchers, your feelings of trust could be deepened if you were exposed to artificial levels of a hormone known as oxytocin. In an experiment described in this month's edition of the journal Nature, scientists found that people playing an investment game were more likely to trust others if they inhaled a nasal spray that contained oxytocin. So, is there a danger that oxytocin could be misused by merchants trying to get you to believe pathetic sales pitches? ANTONIO DAMASIO, a neurologist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, told Nature.com that there shouldn't be much to worry about. In any event, advertising already appeals to the parts of your mind that produce oxytocin, he said. "It lures you in with images of wonderful landscapes or sex, and it probably works in exactly the same way," Damasio told Nature.com.
http://news.com.com/2061-10786_3-5729767.html

Damasio Addresses Oxytocin Use (NZZ Online, June 3)
Scientists from Zurich University have demonstrated how a squirt of the hormone oxytocin up the nose stimulates trusting behavior in humans. The research, in this week's edition of Nature, could lead to a better understanding of mental problems associated with social dysfunctions such as phobias and autism. "Of course, this finding could be misused," said Ernst Fehr, the senior researcher in the study, thus anticipating most people's first reactions and consequent plans to make their millions. "Some may worry about the prospect that political operators will generously spray the crowd with oxytocin at rallies of their candidates," said Iowa University neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, who reviewed the experiments for the science journal. The article appeared on an English-language version of a Swiss newspaper.
http://www.nzz.ch/2005/06/03/eng/article5838999.html

Hunnicutt Comments On Excessive Work (Toledo Blade June 3)
Thursday was national "Leave the Office Earlier Day," but most people did not expect to find seas of empty desks at quitting time. For many salaried employees, leaving work early means getting home in time to watch the summer sun sink below the skyline. These days, the notion of a 9-to-5 workday seems as quaint as a rotary phone. One in three American employees reports feeling chronically overworked, according to a 2004 study by the Families and Work Institute. Technology -- that great enabler and speeder-upper -- combined with the economy's relentless 24/7 rhythms contribute to a sense of work overload. "We have all become long-distance runners, plunging along at a sprinter's pace," said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. Hunnicutt, a board member of "Take Back Your Time," a broad-based coalition that warns of an epidemic of overwork and over-scheduling, points to polls such as those by Harris Interactive Inc. indicating that Americans are working longer. The newspaper is based in Ohio. The article also appeared on the websites of the SUN SENTINEL in Florida, BUFFALO NEWS in New York, and the ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL in Pennsylvania.
http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050603/NEWS08/506030320/-1/NEWS

Westerhaus' NCAA Hiring Noted (Indianapolis Star, June 3)
Floyd Keith, the executive director of the Black Coaches Association, Thursday called on black high school athletes and their parents to consider enrolling at schools with more inclusive hiring procedures in their athletic departments following the release of a report critical of those practices. The reason for Keith's ire was a study compiled by Richard Lapchick, who heads the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida. It noted increased hiring of black head coaches in men's basketball but was critical of minority hiring in most other areas of intercollegiate athletics. Lapchick said the NCAA downplayed the report's significance when he first began issuing it in 1995. But current president Myles Brand has shown a willingness to change, he said. Last month, the NCAA hired CHARLOTTE WESTERHAUS, former head of diversity programs at the University of Iowa, to the newly created position of vice president for diversity and inclusion. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050603/SPORTS/506030449

UI Bookstore's Computer Breached (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 3)
Hackers have breached a computer at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S bookstore, possibly gaining access to up to 30,000 customers' credit-card numbers, campus officials say. The online edition of the Chronicle noted an Associated Press story about the breach in its technology weblog.
http://wiredcampus.chronicle.com/

Report Notes Westerhaus Apppointment (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 3)
More women but fewer members of minority groups are getting hired in college athletics, according to a report released on Thursday by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport. Especially among athletics directors and conference commissioners, the leadership of college sports remains overwhelmingly white, the report says. The report criticizes the NCAA for a decline in the diversity of its senior staff, referring to the resignations of Daniel J. Boggan and Danita Edwards-Knight, both vice presidents. However, two African-American men (Bernard J. Franklin and Ronald D. Stratten) and three women (Elsa Kircher Cole, Sue Donahoe, and Judith R. Sweet) remain as vice presidents. The report also notes that the NCAA hired CHARLOTTE WESTERHAUS, an African-American woman, last month as vice president for diversity and inclusion. Ms. Westerhaus had been director of diversity and equal opportunity at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/prm/daily/2005/06/2005060302n.htm

Job Classification Decision Paves Way For UI Union Vote (WQAD-TV, June 3)
About 2,800 professional and scientific employees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will be eligible to vote in an upcoming election on union representation.

An agreement struck Friday between the university and the Service Employees International Union Local 199 includes about 150 job classifications currently not covered by a union. That's according to David Leshtz, a union organizer. The union filed a petition earlier this month with the Iowa Public Employment Relations Board seeking an election on behalf of professional and scientific staff at the university. SEIU already represents health care workers at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=3429711

Damasio Notes Advertising, Oxytocin Connection (Washington Times, June 2)
People are more likely to trust their money to someone else if they sniff oxytocin, a brain chemical nicknamed the "love hormone," Swiss researchers say. The naturally occurring compound, triggered by a number of stimuli that include sex and breastfeeding, is known as being important to forming social and romantic ties. Researchers, reporting in the London journal Nature, said that shows oxytocin boosts social interactions rather than merely making people more willing to take risks. Could unscrupulous stores pump the air full of oxytocin to boost sales? Perhaps, said University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, but advertising already uses tricks to get people to trust a brand that probably work "exactly the same way."
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20050602-032836-7339r.htm

Grady Comments On Unauthorized Computer Access (SC Magazine, June 2)
The University of Iowa suffered security breach as a hacker accessed a computer that contained credit card information for about 30,000 customers. The breach occurred at the University's Book Store on May 18 and forced the establishment to notify its customers, although it was keen to stress it was unaware that any information was actually taken. Security firms Verisign and the Starken Group have been hired by UI to work on preventing any further breaches. "The confidentiality of the bookstore customers' private financial information is one of our highest priorities," said DAVID GRADY, UI assistant vice president for student services. "Since this incident, we have been working closely with UI Information Technology Security Office and our consultants to understand how this breach occurred and to determine what steps we can take to avert a recurrence." SC Magazine, based in the UK, covers news for and about security professionals. The publication is based in the United Kingdom.
http://www.scmagazine.com/news/index.cfm?fuseaction=newsDetails&newsUID=429777d9-1d91-496b-bf5c-fcc15e859f70&newsType=Latest%20News

UI Student In Carnival Family Business (Terre Haute Tribune Star, June 2)
In a feature about a traveling carnival, Luehrs' Ideal Rides Inc. of Belleville, Ill., carnival operator, Jean Clair, says that her son Joseph, is a Duke grad pursuing a master's degree in fine arts at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and is part of the family business. The newspaper is based in Indiana.
http://www.tribstar.com/articles/2005/06/03/news/mark_bennett/bennett01.txt

Hunnicutt Comments On Excessive Work (Chicago Tribune, June 2)
Thursday is national "Leave the Office Earlier Day," but do not expect to find seas of empty desks at quitting time. For many salaried employees, leaving work early means getting home in time to watch the summer sun sink below the skyline. These days, the notion of a 9-to-5 workday seems as quaint as a rotary phone. One in three American employees reports feeling chronically overworked, according to a 2004 study by the Families and Work Institute. Technology -- that great enabler and speeder-upper -- combined with the economy's relentless 24/7 rhythms contribute to a sense of work overload. "We have all become long-distance runners, plunging along at a sprinter's pace," said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. Hunnicutt, a board member of "Take Back Your Time," a broad-based coalition that warns of an epidemic of overwork and over-scheduling, points to polls such as those by Harris Interactive Inc. indicating that Americans are working longer. This article also appeared June 2 on the websites of NEWSDAY in New York, ARIZONA DAILY STAR, and the PIONEER PRESS in St. Paul, Minn.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0506020208jun02,1,3868616.story?coll=chi-news-hed

Damasio Comments On Hormone Oxytocin (CNN, June 2)
It sounds like the plot for another Batman sequel: The villain sprays Gotham City with a trust hormone and people rush to give him all their money. Banks, the stock market and even governments collapse. Farfetched? Swiss and American scientists demonstrate in new experiments how a squirt of the hormone oxytocin stimulates trusting behavior in humans, and they acknowledge that the possibility of abuse can't be ignored. Other scientists say the new research raises important questions about oxytocin's potential as a therapy for conditions like autism, in which trust is diminished. Or, perhaps the hormone's activity could be reduced to treat more rare diseases, like Williams syndrome, in which children approach strangers fearlessly. "Might their high level of trust be due to excessive oxytocin release?" asks University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, who reviewed the experiments for Nature. "Little is known about the neurobiology of trust, although the phenomenon is beginning to attract attention." Versions of this Associated Press article appeared June 2 in the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, GAINESVILLE (Fla.) SUN, INLAND VALLEY (Calif.) DAILY BULLETIN, PEORIA JOURNAL STAR, FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, BUCKS COUNTY (Pa.) COURIER TIMES, CONNECTICUT POST, WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM, TUSCALOOSA (Ala.) NEWS, CHICAGO DAILY SOUTHTOWN, FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR TELEGRAM, ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE, PROVO (Utah) DAILY HERALD, DAILY BREEZE in California, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, LONG BEACH (Calif.) PRESS-TELEGRAM, broadcast affiliates in Texas, California, North Carolina, Connecticut, Florida, Missouri, Indiana, and Wisconsin, and numerous other news outlets.
http://www.cnn.com/2005/HEALTH/06/01/trust.hormone.ap/

Damasio: Reason Plus Emotion Creates Trust (NPR-Morning Edition, June 2)
Researchers say people are more likely to trust others if they inhale a chemical called oxytocin. In an experiment, volunteers who inhaled oxytocin, a hormone involved in childbirth, were far more likely than to trust someone else with their money than people not exposed to the hormone. So should we expect a new "trust perfume?" Probably not. "It would be a mistake to say oxytocin equals trust," said ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa. He said trust is more than just a chemical reaction. "Trust is something very complex and it is something that is cognitive. It has to do with our mind making judgments. But of course when we make those judgments inevitably we also generate emotion and feeling in relation to those judgments." Damasio says it's the combination of reason and emotion that's allowed people to create societies based on trust.
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4676683

Damasio Addresses Fear Of Oxytocin Abuse (Philadelphia Inquirer, June 2)
A hormone known to make fools fall in love may also part fools from their money, according to a recent experiment from Switzerland. There, a team of psychologists and economists set up a game simulating financial investment and found that a whiff of the hormone oxytocin -- previously linked to mating in other mammals -- induced human subjects to more readily trust others with money. The findings were published in today's issue of the journal Nature. Could this also be abused to induce people to make gullible choices? University of Iowa Neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO raises the issue in a commentary accompanying the paper. "Some may worry about the prospect that political operators will generously spray the crowd with oxytocin at rallies of their candidates," he wrote. Versions of this Knight Ridder article appeared June 2 in the NORTHEAST MISSISSIPPI DAILY JOURNAL, MYRTLE BEACH SUN-NEWS, KANSAS CITY STAR, CORVALLIS (Ore.) GAZETTE-TIMES, BILLINGS (Mont.) GAZETTE, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINEL, and WILKES-BARRE (Pa.) TIMES LEADER.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/front/11792148.htm

Damasio: Study Has 'Powerful Implications' (Los Angeles Times, June 2)
The essence of trust -- a catalyst of all friendship, trade and democracy -- is a neurochemical that can be distilled in a nasal spray and used to ease the natural suspicion of strangers, researchers reported yesterday. The discovery is the first direct evidence that a hormone called oxytoxcin, which evolved 100 million years ago to aid mating among fish and breast feeding among mammals, also promotes trust between human beings, the scientists said. The finding is an important advance in understanding the biology of human behavior, two independent experts said. "Oxytocin enhanced trust," said University of Iowa neuroscientist ANTONIO DAMASIO. "The finding has powerful implications for understanding the brain. Remove trust and you compromise love, friendship, trade and leadership." A version of this Los Angeles Times story appeared June 2 on the websites of the BALTIMORE SUN, MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, CONCORD (N.H.) MONITOR, and THE DAY in Connecticut.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-sci-trust2jun02,1,6954083.story?coll=la-headlines-nation

Damasio: 'Elegant' Study Joins Cognition, Biology (New York Times, June 2)
In a finding that may someday benefit the socially manipulative as well as the socially awkward, Swiss researchers are reporting that doses of a natural hormone significantly increased the level of trust that people placed in strangers who were handling their money. Scientists have long known that the hormone used in the study -- oxytocin, which circulates widely in the body during childbirth and lactation -- prompts warm relations and mating in other mammals. But they say the Swiss study, which appears in today's issue of the journal Nature, is the first to show that a simple administration of a hormone in humans can consistently alter something as socially sensitive as trust. The new finding could help researchers not only understand the biological system underlying social judgments but also perhaps correct it when it goes awry, as in conditions like social phobia or autism, scientists say. Neuroscientists who were not involved in the study said any hopes for new treatments or fears of abuse of the hormone were premature. "One always wants to see something like this replicated, and we understand very little about how this oxytocin system works," said Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, who wrote an accompanying editorial in the journal. "But this is a very elegant, simple and plausible finding, and is significant because it joins cognitive processes to an underlying biological regulation." A version of this article also appeared June 2 in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, BOSTON GLOBE, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, SEATTLE TIMES, and THE LEDGER in Florida.
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/02/science/02trust.html

Damasio Comments On Oxytocin Study (Chicago Tribune, June 2)
Trust takes time. But if time is short, trust may bloom from a fine mist of hormones sprayed into your nostrils. That's the remarkable finding of a new study in which people who inhaled a brain compound called oxytocin became more trusting, allowing a partner to invest more simulated money than people who didn't get the hormone. It could be a surreal fantasy come true for con men or politicians, though for now neuroscientists are the ones most excited about the report by Swiss and American researchers, to be published Thursday in the journal Nature. "It's a very important study," said ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine, who wrote an accompanying commentary on the Nature study. Although Damasio focused on the meaning for brain science, he conceded he's concerned about the potential for misuse of a chemical that may make people more trusting without their conscious knowledge. "One has visions of political operatives spraying it at rallies," he said, only half-joking. A version of this article also appeared June 2 in the CAPE COD (Mass.) TIMES, the PIONEER PRESS in St. Paul, Minn., BARRE MONTPELIER TIMES ARGUS in Vermont, and PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0506020186jun02,1,7884973.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Damasio: Study Opens New Investigative Avenues (USA Today, June 2)
Better deception through chemistry may be making its way to a nose near you, reports a team of neurochemists. Oxytocin, a hormone used to stimulate contractions during labor, also appears to be a trust-builder when inhaled, says the team led by Michael Kosfeld of Switzerland's University of Zurich. The report on the hormone, known in its synthetic form as Pitocin, appears in Thursday's journal Nature. "The authors' results open up possibilities for investigating conditions in which trust is either diminished, as in autism, or augmented," says neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa College of Medicine in a commentary accompanying the report. Some people with brain injuries and children with a genetic disorder display excessive trust of strangers, he notes, which may result from too much oxytocin. The researchers also suggest that extremely shy people could benefit from a dose.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-06-01-trust_x.htm

Damasio Addresses Possible Oxytocin Abuse (The Guardian, June 2)
Swiss scientists have realized the snake oil salesman's dream: a potion that increases trust. One whiff of a brain-penetrating hormone called oxytocin, and you would trust him with your wallet, if not your life. Oxytocin plays a role in the bonding between mother and suckling infant; it helps you feel that you "know" someone you have met before, and it plays a powerful role in romantic love and desire. Now, Swiss scientists report in Nature today, a few molecules in the nostrils will make you more inclined to trust a business partner. Quite how oxytocin plays its part is not yet clear. But human society functions on trust, according to ANTONIO DAMASIO, of the University of Iowa. "Some may worry about the prospect that political operators will generously spray the crowd with oxytocin at rallies of their candidates," he adds in Nature. The newspaper is based in the U.K.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,1497244,00.html?gusrc=rss

Damasio: Marketing May Be Connected To Oxytocin (BBC.com, June 2)
A key hormone helps determine whether we will trust lovers, friends or business contacts, scientists claim. Exposure to an oxytocin "potion" led people to be more trusting, tests by University of Zurich researchers found. They say in Nature the finding could help people with conditions such as autism, where relating to others can be a problem. Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO of the Department of Neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, said some may fear the findings could be used by those trying to gain people's trust. "Some may worry about the prospect that political operators will generously spray the crowd with oxytocin at rallies of their candidates. The scenario may be rather too close to reality for comfort, but those with such fears should note that current marketing techniques -- for political and other products -- may well exert their effects through the natural release of molecules such as oxytocin in response to well-crafted stimuli. Civic alarm at such abuses should have started long before this study."
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4599299.stm

Damasio Addresses Marketing, Oxytocin (Washington Post, June 2)
Scientists have found the chemical equivalent of the perfect sales pitch: a hormone that makes us more trusting than we normally are. Volunteers in a study were told they were participating in a decision-making experiment. Those who inhaled the hormone, which occurs naturally in the brain, were more likely to entrust others with large sums of money than were volunteers who inhaled no hormone. "Some may worry about the prospect that political operators will generously spray the crowd with oxytocin at rallies of their candidates," said neurologist ANTONIO R. DAMASIO of the University of Iowa, who has long studied the neurobiology of human emotions and who wrote a commentary accompanying the study. At the same time, he added in an interview, politicians and marketers were probably already triggering the natural release of oxytocin in the brains of audiences through their campaigns. "I am more alarmed about the manipulations of marketing than the possibility of oxytocin sprays," he said. Versions of this article also appeared June 2 in the CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES and DETROIT NEWS.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/01/AR2005060101072.html?sub=AR

Damasio Comments On Potential Political Oxytocin Use (Globe & Mail, June 2)
Shakespeare told us to "love all, trust a few," even to "trust none, for oaths are straws." Despite such warnings, trust has always been at the centre of all human dealings -- romantic, commercial, or political -- even if the reasons for it have been murky. But now Swiss researchers say they have finally isolated the secret: In oxytocin, we trust. University students who inhaled the hormone in a nasal spray were discovered to be far more trusting of one another -- eager, in fact, to hand over money to strangers in investment deals. The results suggest trust can be bottled and used to forge commercial relationships. Oxytocin levels have long been known to spike with sexual climax or influence the production of mothers' milk, but the new study suggests they are also "the biological basis of trust among humans." The team was led by Dr. Michael Kosfeld of the University of Zurich, whose findings appear in the journal Nature. Commentators say that the study has implications for just about everyone who takes an interest in any human behavior -- from love, to politics, to marketing and beyond. "Some may worry about the prospect that political operators will generously spray the crowd with oxytocin at rallies of their candidates," said University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO in a commentary in Nature. The newspaper is based in Toronto, Canada.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20050602/TRUST02/TPHealth/

UI To Collaborate On NASA-Funded Study (Foster's Daily Democrat, June 2)
The University of New Hampshire has received the largest, single research award in the history of the institution -- $38 million from NASA to build instruments for the space agency's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission. Along with UNH, co-investigators include the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the French Center for Terrestrial and Planetary Environments, the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology, the Technical University of Braunschweig, the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in New Hampshire. A version of this story also appeared in THE UNION LEADER in New Hampshire.
http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050602/NEWS0802/106020056

Chang Discusses Writing, UI Workshop (Somerville News, June 2)
A columnist shares his conversation with LAN SAMANTHA CHANG, new director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop.
http://somervillenews.typepad.com/the_somerville_news/2005/06/off_the_shelf_b.html

Kirchhoff Cites Disease In Illegal Immigrants (Tuscon Weekly, June 2)
The threat illegal immigration poses to American public health plays out every day at Arizona's hospitals. Until recently, the issue remained only marginally public, a problem medical people batted around among themselves, not with the media. The federal law that put the hospitals on the hook for the medical bills of illegals goes by the acronym EMTALA -- Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act. It says that anybody who shows up in an ER must get screened, treated and stabilized, regardless of citizenship or ability to pay. In cities with huge illegal populations, such as Los Angeles, the effects have been disastrous. In its spring 2005 issue, the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons reported that between 1993 and 2003, 60 California hospitals closed because, for several reasons including EMTALA, half of their services became unpaid. The Web and print media are full of stories about the diseases illegals carry, and their effect on American health. But some writers make alarming claims with sketchy evidence at best. In the cases of two diseases, however -- Chagas and tuberculosis -- the evidence is clearer that they're indeed coming across our border. Chagas, a potentially fatal illness spread by contact with the feces of the reduviid bug, called the "kissing bug," is prevalent in South and Central America. Fifteen million people in that region are infected with the parasite, and 50,000 die of it every year, according to the World Health Organization. A person can be infected for 10 or 20 years or more before showing symptoms, making it particularly insidious. At its most severe, the disease can cause the heart to fail, and literally explode. LOUIS KIRCHHOFF, of the University of Iowa Medical School, estimates that between 80,000 and 120,000 Latin Americans with Chagas live here. Matching prevalence studies and immigration numbers, Kirchhoff figures about 10 Chagas-infected persons entered every day from Mexico alone in the 1990s.
http://www.tucsonweekly.com/gbase/Currents/Content?oid=oid:69346

Kutcher Planned To Study Biochemical Engineering At UI (Fox News, June 1)
Following the success of "That '70s Show" and MTV's "Punk'd," actor Ashton Kutcher plans to produce another reality comedy series, "Beauty and the Geek," premiering Wednesday night on the WB. The story says that Kutcher was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, five minutes before his fraternal twin brother, Michael, who was diagnosed at age 13 with cardiomyopathy. The deadly disease eats away at the heart muscles. Michael survived with a heart transplant. Before being discovered by a modeling agent, Ashton was studying biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA so he could pursue a cure for his brother's disease.
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,158161,00.html

Damasio Comments On Hormone Oxytocin (Santa Fe New Mexican, June 1)
Trust in a bottle? It sounds like a marketer's fantasy, like the fabled fountain of youth or the wild claims of fad diets. Yet that's what Swiss and American scientists demonstrate in new experiments with a nasal spray containing the hormone oxytocin. After a few squirts, human subjects were significantly more trusting and willing to invest money with no ironclad promise of a profit. Some scientists say the new research raises important questions about oxytocin's potential as a therapy for conditions like autism or social phobias, in which trust is diminished. Or, perhaps the hormone's activity could be reduced to treat more rare diseases, like Williams' Syndrome, in which children have no inhibitions and approach strangers fearlessly. "Might their high level of trust be due to excessive oxytocin release?" asks University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, who reviewed the experiments for Nature. "Little is known about the neurobiology of trust, although the phenomenon is beginning to attract attention."
http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/14330.html

Playwright Attended UI (Cincinnati Enquirer, June 1)
A story about playwright Chip Gambill, whose 50-minute "Dream of the Astronaut" will be performed at the Cincinnati Fringe Festival, says that Gambill started as a fiction writer with a master's of fine arts from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He moved to New York, started going to theater, saw Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia" and decided that stage was the best medium for his stories.
http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050601/ENT07/506010312

UI Studied Golf Course Workers (E/The Environmental Magazine, May/June 2005)
A story about the health risks associated with using chemicals to maintain lawns says that scientists are examining a population that experiences regular, extensive exposure to herbicides over long periods of time -- golf course superintendents. Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed a 23 percent increase in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 29 percent increase in prostate cancer, 17 percent increase in cancer of the large intestine, and 20 percent increase in brain and nervous system cancers.
http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2476

 

 

 

 

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