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UI in the News

September, 2004

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Interest In Stature Subject Of Unpublished Dissertation (Chronicle, Oct. 1)
A story about how stature has become a political advantage -- or liability - among presidential candidates during debates says that an unpublished UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dissertation by Michael Tavel Clarke, "These Days of Large Things: The Culture of Size in America, 1865-1930" (2001), suggests that the interest in personal size and strength was partly a response to the emergence of industrial combinations and other corporate giants that threatened to crush individuality. At the same time, the scientific professionals of the late-19th and early-20th centuries regarded small stature in Africa, Asia and Europe as a throwback to primitivism and feared its importation. Eugenic interpretations of stature abounded.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i06/06b01201.htm

UI Recruitment Procedures Cited (Chronicle, Oct. 1)
In the wake of a scandal at the University of Colorado, which has been investigated for using sex and alcohol in football recruiting, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has banned the use of hostesses in the recruitment of athletes. Now only current athletes or students who give campus tours to prospective students in general can play host to recruits. The University of Iowa has avoided the possibility of any such expectations among its recruits by having a group comprising both men and women help out with unofficial visits, says JON MCLAUGHLIN, quality-control assistant for Iowa's football team. "The school was not interested, and neither was Coach Ferentz, in having a female host group, the stereotype and stigma of exploiting female students as 'spokesmodels,'" he says. "But we do need students to help host on game day." When KIRK J. FERENTZ arrived at Iowa six years ago, he and his staff asked men and women who volunteered as Students Today Alumni Tomorrow Ambassadors in the alumni office to play host to recruits during unofficial visits.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i06/06a03701.htm

Berg: IEM Traders Confident Of Bush Win (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 30)
As the presidential candidates prepare for their first debate, shares of George W. Bush are trading around 70 cents this week on the Iowa Electronic Markets, while those of John F. Kerry have dropped to around 30 cents. Instead of soybeans or pork bellies, this market allows investors to bet on election outcomes. Created as a teaching tool, the market was started during the 1988 presidential election by the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business and has become a barometer closely watched by political pundits. The market prices reflect the perceived probability of each candidate's chances of winning. Over the summer, Bush and Kerry were running neck and neck, but Bush has gained market share steadily over the past four weeks. "Traders seem to be thinking that there is a significant probability that Bush will win, and possibly by a large margin," said JOYCE BERG, the market's co-director and an associate accounting professor.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0409300335sep30,1,7950504.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Talbott Says Iowa Democrats Are Discouraged (Newark Star-Ledger, Sept. 30)
Iowa Democrats are sticking with John Kerry, but among the faithful there's a widespread feeling of disappointment in the campaign. "They're totally discouraged," said BASIL TALBOTT, who teaches journalism at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. With polls turning against him and signs of dejection showing up among some of his supporters, tonight's first presidential debate has acquired larger than expected importance for Kerry -- a chance to reverse the downward momentum.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-17/1096535591161090.xml

Redlawsk, UI Students Comment On Election (Straits-Times, Sept. 30)
The 750km stretch of Interstate 80 between Lincoln, Nebraska, and Iowa City on the eastern edge of the neighboring state of Iowa runs mostly through flat plains. Corn and cattle cover them as far as the eye can see. Despite the apparent lack of anything else to look at, endless convoys of big sports utility vehicles and bigger pick-up trucks, some waving flags, crowd the highway on weekends at this time of the year. Motels are full, even in tiny towns such as Oakdale. It is the start of college football season and it seems like the United States presidential election is the furthest thing from anyone's mind here along the main artery of the American heartlands. Karen Emmerson is head of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA (UI) Democrats. She fears the students here are more interested in how their beloved Hawkeyes will fare against Michigan State's Spartans this weekend in the annual autumn ritual known as the 'homecoming' game than they are in tonight's first presidential debate. "Since I am more immersed in political activity, it certainly seems like that to me," she says. "I am also a season ticket holder, but for me, football games become more of a break from politics." Anna Hall, co-chairman of the Students for George W. Bush group, plans to capitalize on the homecoming festivities and the fact that Americans can vote from age 18, thus giving most university students the chance to choose their next president. "We have a float in the parade -- it is like a big ad for the President that we will take down through campus," she says. DAVID REDLAWSK, an assistant professor at UI's political science department, says that while old Democratic Party states such as Ohio have swung to the Republicans since the 1970s, Iowa has gone the other way. "It is partly due to a really aggressive Democratic Party organization in the state, which comes out of the caucuses. The caucuses make a lot of money for the party," he says. "So it is a well-funded Democratic Party that has been able to maintain strength while it has lost out in other states." The newspaper is based in Singapore.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/world/story/0,4386,275271,00.html

Olshansky Comments On Magnet Surgery Benefits (News 14 Carolina, Sept. 30)
Doctors have begun using two giant magnets the size of jet engines to guide a magnetically-tipped catheter to precisely perform surgery on the heart. The new technology, which is called Stereotaxis, is already helping people like Scott Gillogly. "It felt like someone shot me in the chest," he said about the moment that led to the discovery that he had congestive heart failure. "I hit the ground. I mean, I was done." Gillogly needed a pacemaker to survive, but the surgery would be complicated. Cardiac electrophysiologist BRIAN OLSHANSKY offered him a solution. "We are now approaching a time when we can do much more sophisticated types of procedures we never thought we could in the past," said Olshansky, of University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. Implanting pacemakers and regulating heartbeats require guiding a wire through tight spaces and holding it in one precise spot. Each heartbeat makes that more challenging. "The Stereotaxis system offers a possibility of placement of the catheter within millimeters of where we want it to be," Olshansky said. The television station is based in North Carolina.
http://www.news14charlotte.com/content/top_stories/default.asp?ArID=75509

Author Phan Attended UI (The Oregonian, Sept. 29)
A story about Aimee Phan's collection of short stories, "We Should Never Meet," says Phan holds a master's of fine arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.oregonlive.com/living/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/living/1096459157252200.xml

UI Medicine Alumnus Fired After Gun Found (WCVB-TV, Sept. 29)
A doctor who left a loaded handgun in an employee's bathroom at Salem Hospital's emergency room was fired after an in-house investigation, while the state Board of Registration in Medicine continues its probe of the incident, his attorney said. As required by contract, the hospital agreed to pay Dr. Richard L. Pinegar three months salary when the hospital decided to let him go last Friday, said his lawyer, Paul Cirel of Boston. "He grew up in Iowa around guns. He's a member of a sportsmen's club, and he keeps his gun locked in a gun safe," Cirel said. "He also works crazy hours in a hospital ER and has to find his car in the parking lot at night. It's his decision, and he's done it by following the law." The story also says that Pinegar is a 1978 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. The station is based in Boston. A version of the story also ran on the website of the WORCESTER TELEGRAM.
http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/3768992/detail.html

Student President: Law Driving Students To Home Parties (WQAD-TV, Sept. 29)
Officials say a year-old law is cutting down on the number of under age drinkers in Iowa City bars, but UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students say the law is driving underage drinkers to private parties, which are less safe. Lindsay Schutte, an Iowa senior and student government president, says the main issue is safety. Students opposed to a proposal to keep everyone under 21 out of bars argue that banning minors from bars will push underage drinking to unmonitored parties in houses and apartment complexes. Schutte said a group of student leaders would go out this weekend and film house parties to create a 5-to-7-minute video of unsafe conditions. The station is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2362418

'Nation Deceived' Report Cited (Up & Coming Weekly, Sept. 29)
A reporter recounts her visits to seven Cumberland County, N.C., schools and says one little boy caught her attention. "At just five years old, he knows and can recite the names of all the earth's continents and oceans," the reporter writes. "He did not hesitate when asked the name of our nation's vice president. This child probably does not have the label yet, but he is obviously 'exceptional,' which often means that his schools are supposed to develop special educational plans to fit his particular needs." The reporter also cites a new study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA titled "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," which argues that by keeping these students on the traditional grade to grade track we are leaving too many of our gifted children behind, losing them, quite frankly, to boredom and frustration. Up & Coming Weekly bills itself as the Cape Fear, N.C., region's leading alternative paper.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1147&dept_id=483434&newsid=13022461&PAG=461&rfi=9

UI Researchers Get Grant To Assemble 'Tree Of Life' (WQAD-TV, Sept. 29)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers have received a $1.6 million grant to help scientists construct a family tree for all life on Earth. Investigators in the university's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Department of Biological Sciences and the Roy J. Carver Center for Comparative Genomics have received the five-year grant from the National Science Foundation. The project is part of a larger N-S-F-funded effort called Assembling the Tree of Life. The Iowa researchers will uncover relationships among plant and animal cells. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2361146

Bhattacharya, Logsdon Land $1.6 Million Grant (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 29)
University of Iowa researchers have received a $1.6 million grant to help scientists construct a family tree for all life on Earth. Investigators DEBASHISH BHATTACHARYA and JOHN LOGSDON, associate professors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences department of biological sciences and the Roy J. Carver Center for Comparative Genomics, have received the five-year grant from the National Science Foundation. The project is part of a larger effort funded by the foundation called Assembling the Tree of Life. The Iowa researchers will uncover relationships among plant and animal cells.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1216370

Dreher Comments On Applicant Deluge (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 29)
With Iowa's nursing shortage expected to worsen as baby boomers grow older, nursing schools have been deluged with applicants, forcing the programs to create waiting lists or turn away applicants. At the same time, college officials say, they are concerned that at some point a flood of nursing graduates might outnumber available jobs. The University of Iowa College of Nursing turned away 150 qualified applicants this semester. MELANIE DREHER, dean of the nursing college, said the university doesn't have enough faculty to accept more than the 75 students who enter the program twice each year. This year, 500 students were on waiting lists in Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1216374

Hornbuckle: Chemicals Need More Study (The State, Sept. 28)
More than 65 years ago in a south New Jersey laboratory, a DuPont Co. chemist accidentally invented a waxy, white powder that would become one of the mainstays of the modern kitchen: Teflon. Today, this nonstick marvel is getting attention far beyond the stovetop. A chemical used to make it, perfluorooctanoic acid - PFOA - has been turning up in people and animals worldwide: river otters in Oregon, polar bears in the Canadian Arctic, and in the blood of 96 percent of children tested in 23 states. In the last three years, journals publishing papers on perfluorochemicals have grown tenfold, to nearly 50, according to the journal Environmental Science & Technology. "Scientists are way behind," said KERI HORNBUCKLE, a University of Iowa engineering professor. "We're scurrying to figure out all the chemical pathways that these chemicals go through." The State is based in Columbia, SC. The same story appeared on the Web sites of the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, KANSAS CITY STAR, MACON TELEGRAPH, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, GRAND FORKS HERALD, COLUMBUS (GA) LEDGER ENQURIER, BILOXI SUN HERALD, MYRTLE BEACH SUN NEWS and numerous other newspapers.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/nation/9771547.htm

Arman Named UIHC Pediatrics Chief (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 28)
A professor from New York University has been named head of the pediatrics department at Children's Hospital of Iowa at University Hospitals. Dr. MICHAEL ARTMAN, 51, also will be physician-in-chief at the hospital when he starts in June.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1642&u_sid=1215379

Alumnus Encourages Students to Read Strunk and White (Rolla Daily News, Sept. 28)
There's no "LOL" -- computer message-speak for "laughing out loud" -- in this book. "U" is a letter, not a pronoun. In St. Joseph's public high schools, instructors aren't "JK" -- just kidding -- about the bad writing habits students pick up from instant messaging, telephone text messaging and computer chat rooms. So they have enlisted the help of grammar heavyweights William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White -- or, more properly, of their reference work, "The Elements of Style." The practice started with Laura Nelson, the school district's communications arts coordinator and a language arts teacher at Central High School. Two years ago, at the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Nelson's professor advised her to read Strunk and White. She passed that advice on to her honors English class last year, requiring students to memorize 20 of the book's 22 rules of writing. "We were able to have an ongoing conversation about writing all year," Nelson said. "We needed something to get us on the same page, and Strunk and White did it." The Daily News is based in Rolla, MO.
http://www.therolladailynews.com/articles/2004/09/27/news/news3.txt

UI Among Schools With Minority Enrollment Declines (Champaign News Gazette, Sep. 28)
Although the University of Illinois just enrolled the largest freshman class in its history, the number of minority students dropped significantly from a year ago. There are 410 black students in the freshman class this year, down almost 200 from 2003. It was the smallest black freshman enrollment in at least the past decade, according to the Office of Admissions and Records. Hispanic student numbers dropped by 20, and American Indian freshman enrollment dipped from 25 to 19. Asian enrollment was up by 453, but the University of Illinois doesn't consider them an under-represented group. Other Big Ten universities such as Ohio State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reported minority declines.
http://www.news-gazette.com/story.cfm?Number=16813

Hornbuckle Comments On Teflon Chemical (Tallahassee Democrat, Sept. 27)
A chemical used to make Teflon, perfluorooctanoic acid -- PFOA -- has been turning up in people and animals worldwide: river otters in Oregon, polar bears in the Canadian Arctic and in the blood of 96 percent of children tested in 23 states. Industry, university and government scientists are hard at work trying to solve the mystery: How do PFOA and other perfluorochemicals get into people to begin with? Could it be from the water? The air? Dust from vacuuming stain-resistant carpets? Suddenly, it's a hot research topic. In the last three years, journals publishing papers on perfluorochemicals have grown tenfold, to nearly 50, according to the journal Environmental Science & Technology. "Scientists are way behind," said KERI HORNBUCKLE, a University of Iowa engineering professor. "We're scurrying to figure out all the chemical pathways that these chemicals go through." The paper is based in Florida. Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, MYRTLE (S.C.) BEACH SUN NEWS, GRAND FORKS (N.C.) HERALD, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, the MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD, the KANSAS CITY STAR and many other media outlets.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/tallahassee/news/nation/9771547.htm

UI Alumna Is Not 'LOL' About E-Grammar (Lawrence Journal World, Sept. 27)
There's no "LOL" -- computer message-speak for "laughing out loud" -- in this book. "U" is a letter, not a pronoun. In St. Joseph's public high schools, instructors aren't "JK" -- just kidding -- about the bad writing habits students pick up from instant messaging, telephone text messaging and computer chat rooms. So they have enlisted the help of grammar heavyweights William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White -- or, more properly, of their reference work, "The Elements of Style." The practice started with Laura Nelson, the school district's communications arts coordinator and a language arts teacher at Central High School. Two years ago, at the Iowa WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Nelson's professor advised her to read Strunk and White. She passed that advice on to her honors English class last year, requiring students to memorize 20 of the book's 22 rules of writing. "We were able to have an ongoing conversation about writing all year," Nelson said. "We needed something to get us on the same page, and Strunk and White did it." The paper is based in Kansas. A version of the story also ran on the website of the KANSAS CITY STAR.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/stateregional/story/182675

Arndt Quoted On Story About Older Addicts (Newark Star-Ledger, Sept. 27)
With rehabilitation efforts generally aimed at younger addicts, experts say most older users of cocaine, heroin, marijuana and other narcotics do not get the help they need, even though their health is more frail. Instead, they say, treatment services can dismiss older addicts as beyond hope and unworthy of care. At the same time, family and friends frequently are in denial about their usage, regarding it as dementia, depression or simply a slip-up. By 2020, 4.4 million older adults are expected to need treatment for some variety of substance abuse, according to a recent estimate by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and North Carolina's Research Triangle Institute. "We are on the crest of a wave coming up," said STEPHAN ARNDT, a University of Iowa psychiatry professor. "You've got two factors: the overall population is getting older, and then you've got all the baby boomers." In a 2003 study, Arndt concluded that fewer than one in five U.S. substance abuse programs geared services to older adults in 2001, the most recent year for which figures were available. He found many elderly either do not receive necessary care or get improper care from programs that pay little attention to their health needs. The paper is based in New Jersey.
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-17/1096260796323880.xml

Arrests Made Following Michigan-UI Game (Ann Arbor News, Sept. 26)
Police arrested eight people and ticketed 27 others Saturday at Michigan Stadium during Michigan's 30-17 defeat of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, according to the U-M Department of Public Safety. Spokeswoman Diane Brown said six fans were arrested for being a minor in possession of alcohol, one for violation of the controlled substance act and one for assault. Brown said 21 people were ticketed for having alcohol in the stadium, three were cited for urinating in public, two for possession of another person's identification and one for sales without a permit or license. The paper is based in Michigan.
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/base/news-0/109619360571600.xml

Squire Comments On Disagreements Within GOP (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 26)
In the final weeks before an election, when political parties usually try to display unity, the Republican-controlled Congress is butting heads with the Republican president. Whether the issue is eligibility for overtime, travel to Cuba or the privatization of government workers, significant numbers of GOP lawmakers are parting company with their president. The new overtime rule, which took effect Aug. 23, revamped the definition of which workers are entitled to overtime pay. Some workers, at their employers' discretion, could be given compensatory time off for extra work. Although the administration contended that far more workers would become eligible for overtime pay than would lose it, organized labor said 6 million workers could lose overtime pay. The House voted to block the administration from implementing the overtime rule when 22 Republicans joined forces with Democrats. A Senate panel has recommended that the Senate follow suit, even though the White House has threatened a veto. Two Iowa Republicans who voted with the Democrats to block the overtime rules, Reps. James A. Leach and Jim Nussle represent districts carried by Democrat Al Gore in the 2000 presidential election. Although the congressmen do not appear in danger of losing their seats, "they did not want to give their opponents an issue to use to rally labor voters," said University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/politics/whitehouse/la-na-congress26sep26,1,5581214.story?coll=la-news-politics-white_house

Merrill Involved In Arts Festival (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sept. 26)
St. Louis has a new arts festival planned for this coming weekend. And if everything works out, it could become an annual feature on the local arts scene. The festival is an outgrowth of Crossings, the classical-music-meets-jazz-meets-whatever series, the baby of spouses Dan Rubright and Melissa Brooks-Rubright, who founded it in 2000. Rubright is a composer-guitarist-arranger; Brooks-Rubright is a cellist in the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. (Their other child is a 2-year-old boy who takes a proprietary attitude toward the family piano.) Crossings decided to revisit the festival concept because of a meeting two years ago. While Brooks-Rubright was playing at a summer festival in Sun Valley, she encountered CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, the head of the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and the seeds of the United Arts Festival were planted. During the festival, Merrill will lead a panel discussion on "what constitutes a life of discovery today."
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/music/story/CA071A3EDD55F29D86256F1800399689?OpenDocument&Headline=Collaboration's+the+key+to+new+festival

Parrott, Nagle Comment On Old Cap Lawsuit (Aberdeen American News, Sept. 25)
The University of Iowa has settled a lawsuit filed against the company blamed for starting a fire at the Old Capitol nearly three years ago. The university accepted $1.9 million in exchange for dismissing the case. That falls short of the university's insurance deductible of $2 million but was determined to be all the money Enviro Safe Air Inc. had in the bank, said university spokesman STEVE PARROTT. The university sued North Sioux City, S.D.-based Enviro Safe on Oct. 31, 2003, claiming negligence and breach of contract by workers who used open flame torches to remove asbestos from portions of Old Capitol. The resulting fire caused an estimated $5.6 million in damage including the building's 160-year-old cupola and bell. The building was covered by an insurance policy with FM Global, Parrott said. The university replaced the dome in February 2003 and plans to have all remaining renovations completed this year, said GARY NAGLE, Old Capitol project manager. The paper is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/9760374.htm

Dwight, UI Cited In Article On NCAA Rules (Chronicle, Sept. 24)
National Collegiate Athletic Association officials endured a tongue-lashing last week from Rep. Spencer Bachus of Alabama during a Congressional hearing into their procedures for investigating whether athletes and institutions have broken NCAA rules. Mr. Bachus, a Republican running unopposed for re-election, criticized the association for not allowing the public to witness hearings before its Committee on Infractions. When a college or its representatives are accused of violating NCAA rules and the association's staff believes that it has evidence of major rules violations, the infractions committee considers presentations by the NCAA's enforcement staff and the college's own representatives. Mr. Bachus spoke at a hearing of the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the House of Representatives' Judiciary Committee. The session featured three witnesses: Jeremy Bloom, a professional skier denied the chance to play football for the University of Colorado at Boulder after he signed endorsement deals with apparel manufacturers; Josephine R. Potuto, a law professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and vice chairwoman of the Division I infractions committee; and B. David Ridpath, who in 2001 was transferred out of Marshall University's athletics department after the university was punished for violating NCAA rules. Ms. Potuto called on one of the nine NCAA staff members in the hearing room to clarify that the football player, Tim Dwight of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, had unintentionally violated the rules while Mr. Bloom had taken the association to court over the rule and then applied for a waiver from it. (Mr. Bloom disputed the distinction in his written testimony, but did not bring it up during the hearing.)
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i05/05a03302.htm

Driving, Phoning Study Done at UI (Wall Street Journal, Sept. 24)
Evidence is mounting that talking on a cellphone while driving can be risky, even when using the increasingly popular "hands-free" devices. A batch of scientific papers presented this week at the annual meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society in New Orleans raised safety questions about voice-activated dialing. In a separate study funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 54 participants drove on a 17-mile freeway in a high-tech driving simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Drivers were divided into three groups: one used a regular manually dialed phone; two others used types of voice-activated dialing. Drivers using voice-activated devices had significantly more dialing errors than the ones holding the phones, said Elizabeth Mazzae, a researcher with NHTSA's Vehicle Research and Test Center in East Liberty, Ohio. Hand-held phone users also dialed their phone significantly more quickly: drivers spent nearly twice as long using voice-activated dialing systems as they did dialing manually, according to the paper.
http://online.wsj.com/public/article/0,,SB109599238867526997,00.html?mod=todays_free_feature

Donor Ordered To Remove Beer from Kinnick Box (KTVO-TV, Sept. 24)
A donor wrote a $5 million check to the University of Iowa's Athletic Department and then, he says, he was ordered to remove the beer he keeps in a private box he leases at Kinnick Stadium. Bill Krause, the CEO of the company that owns 420 Kum & Go convenience stores, says he has stocked his Kinnick box's refrigerator with beer for Hawkeye games for the past 10 years, thanks to an "accommodation" the school had made. School spokesman STEVE PARROTT said no one from the university ordered the removal of beer from Krause's box to the knowledge of school officials. KTVO is based in Kirksville, Mo.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=2340052&nav=1LFsREti

Estes To Teach in Boston (Alliston-Brighton Tab, Sept. 24)
Boston University College of Fine Arts has announced the appointment of bass-baritone Simon Estes as a faculty member for the fall semester of 2004. Estes will have a studio at the School of Music and work with voice students as well as teach master classes in the areas of operatic training, performance and management. Estes attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and The Juilliard School in New York City, where he has been a professor since 1985. He also teaches at Iowa State University in Ames, at Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa, and in master classes across the country. The paper is based in Massachusetts. http://www2.townonline.com/allston/artsLifestyle/view.bg?articleid=92105

UI Hospitals Adds Computer (Investor's Business Daily, Sept. 24)
Though pundits have long dismissed mainframe computers as throwbacks to a long-gone era, the big, brawny machines are very much alive. Few systems are as easy to manage as the mainframe. These big iron systems can pretend to be hundreds of smaller machines, a technique known as virtualization. Instead of having a full-time staff taking care of an army of smaller computers, one or two experts can keep track of one big mainframe. Virtualization also leaves the mainframe doing more things at once. That's one reason the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS recently added IBM's z890 to its arsenal. The health care provider aims to go paperless.
http://www.investors.com/editorial/tech01.asp?v=9/24

UI Graduate Student Attends "Bored" Meeting"  (Fremont Tribune, Sept. 24)
At a meeting of former classmates at closed school in Webster, Neb., dubbed a "Bored" meeting, Corrine Giggee visited with her Webster art and science teacher, Judy Jorgensen. Giggee, a graduate student in the physician assistant program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, credits Jorgensen and dissecting a pig's heart in her class with sparking her interest in science and medicine. "With only three in my class, we got a lot of individual attention," Giggee said. The Tribune is based in Fremont, Neb.
http://www.fremontneb.com/articles/2004/09/23/news/news7.txt

Artist Studied at UI (Potomac News, Sept. 24)
Joseph Henry Lonas' philosophy about creating art has remained constant throughout his life. Through Oct. 29 a retrospective of his work is on display at the Center for the Arts' Canton Merchant Family Gallery. Lonas, 79, studyied art at the College of William & Mary and completing a master of fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The newspaper is based in Woodbridge, Va.
http://www.potomacnews.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WPN%2FMGArticle%2FWPN_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1031778126242&path=

UI Accelerated Learning Study Noted (Marketplace, Sept. 23)
Are American schools holding back their brightest kids? That's the conclusion of a new study about accelerated learning from the University of Iowa. The report quotes NICHOLAS COLANGELO, UI professor of education and director of the the Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development:  "Good education has a very strong individualized component.  We can't keep treating kids, just because they are 10 years old, basically the same. Marketplace is a buisiness progam broadcast on several public radio stations across the U.S.
http://marketplace.publicradio.org/morning_report/2004/09/23_mmr.html

Bush Widens Lead in IEM (Bloomberg, Sept. 23)
U.S. President George W. Bush has widened his lead over Democratic challenger John Kerry in online futures markets, matching trends in some voter and investor polls following the Republican convention three weeks ago. Iowa Electronic Markets, a nonprofit political betting system run by the University of Iowa, gave Bush a 60 percent probability of victory, up from 50 percent on Aug. 21. The Iowa Electronic Market has been off an average of 1.37 percentage points from the actual popular vote tally since it began in 1988, said THOMAS RIETZ, a professor of finance at the University of Iowa's business school who directs the markets. That compares to an average of 1.93 points for polls, he said. Events could alter the election's outcome and render the futures forecast moot, Reitz said. ``We think it is a forecast that is better than the next best alternative but it is still a forecast,'' that Rietz said.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=auRKAvfbI0Bc&refer=us

Beer Removed From Donor's Kinnick Box (USA Today, Sept. 23)
Bill Krause, who donated $5 million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT, said his staff was ordered to remove beer from his private box at Kinnick Stadium. The corporate CEO isn't sure who gave the order before the Sept. 11 football game against Iowa State. The school denied issuing it.
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20040924/a_states24.art.htm

Forsythe Comments On Bush IEM Lead (New York Post, Sept. 23)
In case Democrats didn't have enough jitters, John Kerry is kerplunking like a stone in the Iowa Political Futures Market — a novel but remarkably accurate predictor that yesterday put the odds of President Bush's re-election at more than 60 percent. The market late yesterday was predicting a Bush win with 52.7 percent of the popular vote to 47 percent for Kerry. In all, 64.8 percent of traders were betting on a Bush win — a dramatic switch from just a month ago when the odds were even on Bush and Kerry. "Bush has broken out substantially in the last few days. It could be a combination of Kerry's speech on Iraq, Bush's speech to the U.N. and even the CBS Dan Rather story imploding," said University of Iowa business dean BOB FORSYTHE, who oversees the market. "Our traders seem to be indicating that not only is Bush ahead, but he may win by a substantial margin," added Forsythe, an undecided voter. This article also appeared Sept. 23 on YAHOO NEWS

IEM Shows Bush Taking Lead (Tech Central Station, Sept. 23)
Forget the polls. The electronic market maintained by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, which makes you put your money where your opinions are, was showing Sunday that George W. Bush had become a 3-2 favorite to beat John Kerry. In other words, to win a dollar if you're right on Nov. 2, you have to put up 60 cents today for a bet on Bush but just 40 cents for Kerry. That's the biggest gap, by far, since the market started offering the wager in early June. The Iowa market (check it out at www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem/markets) isn't infallible, but academic research shows it has a better track record than public opinion surveys, and it tends to be far more stable -- which is why the latest numbers are so shocking and significant. The website provides news, analysis, research, and commentary about the intersection of technology and public policy.
http://www.techcentralstation.com/092304F.html

UI Observatory Near Riverside Cited (The Scotsman, Sept. 23)
He was on a mission to seek out new life and new civilisations - to boldly go where no man has gone before. So, Captain James T Kirk, fearless commander of the Starship Enterprise , headed for Iowa ... to make a low-budget sci-fi flick. William Shatner, who immortalised the intergalactic explorer in Star Trek, arrived in the small town of Riverside yesterday to film Invasion Iowa, penned by Shatner and his co-star Leonard Nimoy, who played Mr. Spock in the series. The location was not accidental - Riverside has been busy trying to build a tourism industry by claiming to be the birthplace of Captain Kirk after Star Trek’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, revealed that the explorer came from "a small town in the state of Iowa". There is now a special gate and a stone monument commemorating its most famous son - or future son, given that his official birth date is not until 22 March, 2233 - and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has built a space observatory nearby. Thousands of fans come for an annual convention.
http://news.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=1113062004

Local Company Worked On UI Optical Fiber Network (Idaho Statesman, Sept. 23)
A local architecture/engineering firm promoted communications engineer John Karel to a computer-aided design lead/IS specialist. While at the company, he has worked on the Idaho State Capitol Renovation Project, the Idaho Department of Transportation optical fiber project, Boise State University's campus optical fiber network project, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's campus optical fiber network project.
http://www.idahostatesman.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040923/NEWS0201/409230336/1029/NEWS03

UI Study On Stability Systems Cited (Investor's Business Daily, Sept. 22)
Gadgets and gizmos are fun enough, but features that ensure a safe, smooth ride are what car buyers really want when it comes to big in-demand options in 2005. Electronic stability control systems, while slower to catch on domestically than overseas, are gaining traction in the U.S. This monitoring system helps keep vehicles in control by braking or slowing engine speed to avoid skidding or rolling over. Last month, Continental Teves, which supplies Ford with its AdvanceTrac system, cited recent studies by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that illustrated how such technology increases driver control by 34 percent and cuts the number of crashes by up to 35 percent. A version of the story also ran on the website of CBS MARKETWATCH.
http://www.investors.com/breakingnews.asp?journalid=23194862&brk=1

Colangelo Quoted About Acceleration Report (Washington Times, Sept. 21)
A report on accelerated learning by the University of Iowa concludes it is in the best interest of gifted students to skip grades. The university report, entitled "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," seeks to discredit common misconceptions concerning accelerated-learning programs: that they are expensive, unfair, and socially isolate talented youth, the Des Moines Register reported. "When children are grade-skipped or given acceleration, the results are very positive, not just cognitively, but socially," said NICK COLANGELO, a co-author of the report and director of the university's Belin-Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talented Development. The report on accelerated learning, which is based on 50 years of research, can be found at www.nationdeceived.org.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20040921-125829-1620r.htm

Colangelo Study Shows Gifted Struggle (WQAD-TV Sept. 21)
While public schools struggle to meet the mandates under No Child Left Behind, a new study from the University of Iowa suggests that gifted students also battle to achieve. "A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students," released Monday, aims to be a wake-up call for schools and parents. "All kids deserve our very best when it comes to education," said Dr. NICHOLAS COLANGELO, director of the Belin-Blank Center at the University of Iowa. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2324590

UI Study Shows Gifted Benefit By Skipping Grades (Time, Sept. 21)
According to a new report from the University of Iowa, allowing gifted children to skip grades can mean the difference between staying in school and dropping out from sheer tedium. "If the work is not challenging for these high-ability kids, they will become invisible," says the lead author of the report, Iowa education professor NICHOLAS COLANGELO. "We will lose them. We already are."
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101040927-699423,00.html

Uc: Even Mild Alzheimer's Risk Driving Errors (Bradenton Herald, Sept. 21)
When a University of Iowa study recently sent people with mild Alzheimer's on the road in a car rigged to watch their every move, researchers found they made significantly more safety errors and wrong turns and got lost more than a group of older people who did not have Alzheimer's. The study, one of the first to use such a car, suggests new methods may be needed to test older, cognitively impaired drivers and new restrictions may be needed on their driving privileges. About 70 percent of those with Alzheimer's made at least two safety errors, such as erratic steering or driving into the bike lane, compared with about 20 percent of those who did not have Alzheimer's. They also made more wrong turns and got lost more often. "There is an increased risk of crashes with Alzheimer's disease," said lead author ERGUN UC, an assistant professor of neurology. The same story appeared on the web sites of the CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, TALLAHASSEE.COM, GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH and numerous other news organizations.
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/nation/9720630.htm

UI Study Shows Tracking Stocks Are Dogs (USA Today, Sept. 21)
Tracking stocks, once popular financial tools that let investors buy stock in a sliver of a company's business, are disappearing almost as fast as they boomed in the '90s. Part of the reason is that the stocks turned out to be dogs. The 28 tracking stocks issued before 1999, on average, lagged behind their industry and the stock market. The trackers gained just 11.7 percent a year during their first three years, well behind the 18 percent return of their industries and the market's 21 percent gain, says a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/markets/us/2004-09-20-notrack_x.htm

Hamilton: Cosmetic Surgery Seen As Less Risky (Washington Times, Sept. 21)
A U.S. survey has found cosmetic surgery is perceived as less risky and with shorter recovery time and less pain than plastic or reconstructive surgery. "This shift in attitude, coupled with the popularity of reality makeover shows, has increased public exposure and demand for cosmetic surgical procedures," said study leader GRANT HAMILTON. Researchers at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City said their survey also suggested people believe cosmetic surgeons required significantly less training than do plastic or reconstructive surgeons. The same story appeared on the web sites of WEBMD.com and MEDICAL NEWS TODAY.
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20040920-053608-4107r.htm

UI To Look For Hawkeye Express Options (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 21)
One Hawkeye fan is having trouble getting to Kinnick Stadium to cheer on his favorite team. Ben Anderson, 17, who has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair, can't ride the Hawkeye Express, a train that transports fans to the stadium, said his father, Terry Anderson, of Ankeny. He said the entrance and exit to the train include 30 steep stairs and is not handicapped accessible. University administrators said the school complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act -- which says public entities that receive tax money can't refuse to allow a person with a disability to participate in a service, program or activity -- because it offers handicapped parking near the stadium. CHARLOTTE WESTERHAUS, the university's director of equal opportunity, said the university is looking into ways to make the train open to people with disabilities. "In the spirit of supporting all Hawkeye fans, we should look into what kind of options we can provide," she said. She didn't know how long the process might take.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1209184

Geography Champ A Big Hawkeyes Fan (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Sept. 20)
Don't try to challenge sixth-grader Joey Busch to a United States geography quiz. You'll probably lose. Joey, a student with Down syndrome at Cottage Grove's Armstrong Elementary in St. Paul, Minn., might struggle with his writing. But his ability to locate states and their capital cities with lightning speed - and more accurately than many of his peers - has inspired those around him. Besides geography, Joey loves sports. He likes to go golfing with his dad. He took tennis lessons this past summer. And Joey loves to play basketball and pingpong with his brothers. He really enjoys going to football games. Joey's favorite teams are the Wolfpack at Cottage Grove's Park High School and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hawkeyes, where his older brother Tom plays college ball. The paper is based in Minnesota.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/local/9708434.htm

Quill, Scroll Society To Judge Writing Contest (Lahontan Valley News, Sept. 20)
Olive Garden's ninth-annual Pasta Tales writing contest seeks answers from kids. As the 2004 presidential election draws near, our nation and what makes it great is top-of-mind for all Americans, including our country's youth.  For that reason, Olive Garden has chosen a timely question for its ninth-annual Pasta Tales national writing contest for kids: "What do you like most about living in the United States and why?" Olive Garden will accept essays of 50-250 words answering that question from young writers in first through 12th grade and up to 18 years of age, beginning October 4 and continuing through December 3. Submissions are judged based on creativity, adherence to theme, organization, grammar, punctuation and spelling by the Quill and Scroll Society of the College of Journalism and Communications at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.lahontanvalleynews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040920/COMMUNITY/109200001

UI Entrepreneurship Program Cited (Chicago Daily Herald, Sept. 20)
More and more college students are realizing it's never too early to become entrepreneurs. "There is no security or lifetime jobs in large corporations anymore, and the students know that," said Gerry Hills, the founder of Collegiate Entrepreneur Organization and a pioneer in teaching business startups. "They can get a job with someone else controlling their destiny, or they can create their own job."  These days, many universities are encouraging students to start businesses with entrepreneurial programs. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for example, the Bedell Entrepreneurship Learning Laboratory is less than a year old and aims to help aspiring entrepreneurs. The lab has 17 fully equipped offices with furniture, computers and high-speed Internet access, a conference room and two larger meeting spaces for student use.
http://www.dailyherald.com/cook/main_story.asp?intID=382504

Blanck Comments On Disability Act (Appleton Post-Crescent, Sept. 20)
Twelve years after the Americans with Disabilities Act declared employment discrimination against the disabled illegal, a Harris poll found the percentage of disabled adults with jobs stuck at about 35 percent. That's nearly identical to the percentage in a 1986 Harris survey. But the figures are misleading, according to experts on the disabled. They say they've seen positive employment gains, many of them among young adults. "Young people who have severe disabilities who want to work, who are capable of being accommodated, their employment rate has risen dramatically," said PETER BLANCK, director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa College of Law. The paper is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.wisinfo.com/postcrescent/news/archive/local_17739352.shtml

Hornbuckle: Scientists Puzzled By PFOA's (Philadelphia Inquirer, Sept. 19)
More than 65 years ago in a South Jersey laboratory, a DuPont Co. chemist accidentally invented a waxy, white powder that would become one of the mainstays of the modern kitchen: Teflon. Today, this nonstick marvel is getting attention far beyond the stove-top. A chemical used to make it, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), has been turning up in people and animals worldwide: river otters in Oregon, polar bears in the Canadian Arctic, and in the blood of 96 percent of children tested in 23 states. Industry, university and government scientists are hard at work trying to solve the other mystery: How do PFOA and other perfluorochemicals get into people to begin with? Could it be from the water? The air? Dust from vacuuming stain-resistant carpets? Suddenly, it's a hot research topic. In the last three years, journals publishing papers on perfluorochemicals have grown tenfold, to nearly 50, according to the journal Environmental Science & Technology. "Scientists are way behind," said KERI HORNBUCKLE, a University of Iowa engineering professor. "We're scurrying to figure out all the chemical pathways that these chemicals go through."
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/9699246.htm

Barron Comments On Class Rankings (Boston Globe, Sept. 19)
Officials at schools such as Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, Ill., where 98 percent of the graduating class goes on to college, say rank can give university admissions staff the wrong impression. Stevenson has 1,035 students in its senior class, so the difference in rank sometimes is measured in hundredths of a percentage point. Stevenson launched a pilot program this year with eight universities that take many of its students. Instead of getting a student's numerical rank, those schools will receive percentages, such as top 5 percent or top 20 percent. Other schools will continue to get transcripts with numerical rank. MICHAEL BARRON, admissions director at the University of Iowa - one of the schools participating in the pilot - said he has seen a definite drop in the number of high schools submitting rank or even percentiles over the past several years. Iowa guarantees admission to out-of-state students who are in the top 30 percent of their class, have a rigorous high school curriculum reviewed by the university and submit applications by Feb. 1. If rank isn't reported or students fall below the 30 percent line, the university takes a holistic approach, considering test scores, GPA, community involvement and other factors. The paper is based in Illinois. Versions of the story also ran on the website of the WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM and the STATE JOURNAL REGISTER in Illinois.
http://www.boston.com/news/education/k_12/articles/2004/09/19/countrys_top_high_schools_making_rank_a_thing_of_the_past/

Segura Says Race Is More Than Appearance (Santa Fe New Mexican, Sept. 19)
A hundred social scientists and geneticists gathered this week in Alexandria to sort out the meaning of race, and didn't, quite. The event served as a brainstorming session for a $4 million project, funded by the National Science Foundation and the Ford Foundation, to create a traveling museum exhibit on race. If all goes well, the exhibit will debut in two years at the Science Museum of Minnesota, in St. Paul. The working title is "Understanding Race and Human Variation." If there was a consensus that emerged from two days of conversation, it's the notion that race is a cultural construct. Investigations into the human genome have so far failed to turn up any evidence that there's such a thing as, for example, a Caucasian. Human beings are genetically rather homogeneous compared with other animals. But the lack of biological support for traditional categories of race does not change the fact that race is a lived reality. GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said that people tend to pay far too much attention to just a few of the morphological differences among humans. People vary in dozens of different ways, he said. "We tend to fetishize the shape of the eyes, the shape of the nose, the color of the skin and the texture of the hair," he said. But he made a prediction: If all the experts in the world suddenly announced that there's no such thing as race, and if newspapers ran the story on the front page, it still wouldn't change the way whites and blacks interact in Alabama.
http://www.santafenewmexican.com/news/4476.html

UI Student Involved In Fatal Accident (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 19)
A woman struck by a car while crossing an Iowa City street in her wheelchair has died of her injuries. Susan Rotman, 52, died Thursday at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS in Iowa City. She was struck by a car driven by Jacob Conner, 19, last Sunday. Conner, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Bettendorf, has not been charged.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1207606

CD Party Planned For UI Alumna (Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 19)
A CD release party and performance will be today to celebrate a new recording featuring flutist Amy Morris, an Omaha native. Morris, who lives in Minneapolis, has a bachelor of music performance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a master's in music performance from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1465&u_sid=1205411

Berg, IEM Predict Close Presidential Race (Financial Times, Sept. 18)
Predicting the next president of the United States is an inexact science and in a close election opinion polls may not offer definitive clues about who will win. Among 12 incumbent presidents seeking re-election since 1936, eight of the nine winners were ahead of their opponents just after Labor Day, according to the Gallup organization. Two who went on to lose were lagging after Labor Day, while the third, Jimmy Carter, saw his lead fade. But some find it instructive to follow the money. Political futures markets and online betting sites historically claim to have been better predictors of political races than polls. IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a real-money futures market, claims its predictions have proved more accurate than opinion polls 76 per cent of the time. Its vote-share market shows a final, election day split of 49.3 percent for Kerry and 50.7 percent for Bush - much closer than most polls indicate. "It's going to be a close race," says JOYCE BERG, co-director of IEM and an associate professor of accounting at the University of Iowa. "There is still a lot of uncertainly about what the outcome would be." An essential difference between opinion polls and markets is that traders put their money on who they think will win the election, versus who they want to win, Berg says. "Our traders have an incentive to put their money where there mouth is. Traders can also express the strength of their belief where in polls everyone is equally weighted."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5102bbaa548e32d58d53859e51b990ac&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=11538c40dfd13ff32c73883893f823e2

Iowa City Rates For Retirees (Newsday, Sept. 18)
You won't read much about Durango, Colo., or Iowa City in David Savageau's latest edition of "Retirement Places Rated," but after analyzing thousands of numbers and survey responses, the author confesses these little-known spots are among his personal favorites. Iowa City: "Sure, the winters are tough, but the people are nice," Savageau says. He also gives a thumbs-up after noting features such as the free public transportation for seniors, a large medical school, and the culturally dominant UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with its weekly performances by a renowned roster of visiting artists at off-off-off- Broadway prices.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5102bbaa548e32d58d53859e51b990ac&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=07706fb0185cd4efb75f5302b0b2be43

UI Stuttering Study Cited (Deseret News, Sept. 18)
An article about the challenges of new litigation on reproductive and genetic rights notes that the U.S. is not immune to misuses of scientific discoveries. There are precedents in the United States of medical experiments or tests that have been deemed grotesque by many. Cited as examples are the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment and the so called "Monster Study," at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which involved researchers attempting to induce stuttering in children with normal speech. Three study participants and the estates of three others filed suit against the university in 2003 seeking compensation for what participants termed a lifetime of emotional damage caused by the study.
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,595092115,00.html

Illinois Academic Team Will Compete At UI (News-Gazette, Sept. 18)
The highly-decorated University of Illinois Academic Buzzer team has its first competition of the young school year in three weeks at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City. The team plans on sending two four-player teams to the competition. The newspaper is based in Urbana-Champaign, Ill.
http://www.news-gazette.com/story.cfm?Number=16760

Neumann Says IEM Is More Accurate Than Polls (Bloomberg TV, Sept. 17)
Currently, the people putting money down on the UI's The Iowa Electronic Markets give President Bush a 59 percent point of victory over John Kerry. GEORGE NEUMANN, co-director of the Iowa Electronic Markets at UI professor of economics, said the IEM is about twice as accurate than polls in predicting presidential votes. "Polls find it almost impossible to get the proverbial random sample. The last thing we want is a random sample of traders. We want the best and the brightest, so our philosophy is 'put your money where your mouth is. Those are the traders we want, people who actually have opinions."
http://nyvidsrch.bloomberg.com/vss-bin/vss_SR/smedia_v2/search?query=%22iowa+electronic+markets%22&search_mode=videos&search_type=videos&max_results=5&template=results_videos.tmpl&fetch_records=all&submit.x=14&submit.y=10

Rizzo Study On Alzheimer's Cited (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Sept. 17)
People with mild Alzheimer's disease make more mistakes on a driving test than older people with no cognitive problems, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "There was no difference in the basic control of the vehicle for the people with Alzheimer's," said study author and neurologist MATTHEW RIZZO, MD, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "This leads us to believe that the mental demands of following verbal instructions and navigating a new route can compete with drivers' cognitive resources and potentially impair their driving abilities."
http://www.ajc.com/health/content/shared-auto/healthnews/trvs/521147.html

Beer, Wine Approved at Kinnick Suites (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 17)
Fans in the new suites at Iowa's Kinnick Stadium will be able to toast a Hawkeye touchdown with a cup of beer or glass of wine. University President DAVID SKORTON announced Thursday that beer and wine will be allowed within the stadium's indoor premium seats and suites. Hard liquor will not be permitted and alcohol consumption will be prohibited in premium seats that are outdoors, said Skorton, who issued the guidelines after studying recommendations from a task force.  The new policy will take effect when the Kinnick remodeling project is completed, which is expected to be in time for the 2006 football season.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=38&u_sid=1205747

Twins Sport UI Venue Names (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 17)
An Iowa City couple have taken their love for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to the next generation. Identical twin boys Kinnick and Carver Boelk were born about 4 a.m. Sept. 12 to Brian and Amy Boelk. The Boelk boys are named after Kinnick Stadium and Carver-Hawkeye Arena. "Our families are both die-hard Hawkeye fans," Amy Boelk said. "And we liked the names from an engineering background. Carver is just a really interesting building, design-wise, and Kinnick is being overhauled." Amy, 28, and Brian, 29, both civil engineers, met at the U of I.  "We figure one will play basketball and one football," Brian Boelk said. "But who knows? They'll probably end up playing golf and tennis. The only rule is they can't go to school at Iowa State."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1638&u_sid=1205829

Open Letter Argues Against UI Press Budget Cuts (Chronicle, Sept. 17)
Proposals to slash the budget of the University of Iowa Press would cripple the publisher and further reduce the range of outlets for academic publishing, three members of the university's research council have warned in an open letter to the campus. Among many possible cuts identified by the committee is $200,000 from the press's annual subsidy of $521,000. The press's annual budget is $1.2-million, with which it publishes 35 titles, on average, per year. Such a reduction, say the three letter writers -- MICHAEL S. CHIBNIK, JAMES L. GIBLIN, and TERESA L. MANGUM, of the departments of anthropology, history and English, respectively -- would prevent the press's seven-person staff from continuing its impressively high output. They also note that the cuts would harm the university's reputation and its contribution to academic publishing. The director of Iowa's press, HOLLY CARVER, agrees that a reduction in the subsidy would hurt the press. With a cut of $200,000, some staff members might have to be dismissed, she says. Even the specter of cuts is impeding her staff's ability to attract larger projects. But the university, she concedes, is in a bind: "This is one of those awful decisions where there are not many options." The concerns of the press and its supporters have been carefully noted, but have one shortcoming, says WILLIAM F. DECKER, Iowa's interim vice president for research: They are premature. The committee has merely identified the press as one among "many, many" possible targets of cuts, he says. "We haven't even begun to discuss the recommendations."
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i04/04a01701.htm

$5.5 Million Bequest Cited (Chronicle, Sept. 17)
The Gifts & Grants section of the Chronicle's website states that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION has received about $5.5 million from the estate of Robert A. Olson for the Robert A. and Ruth B. Olson Special Collections Fund, Museum of Art, athletics, the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, the College of Law, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Museum of Natural History, the Presidential Scholars Program, and unrestricted support.
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i04/04a04401.htm

Osterberg, Cook on "Green Bike Tour" (Fairmont Sentinel, Sept. 16)
"Green Bike Tour" members visited Fairmont, Minn. this week to tout the benefits of renewable energy, such as wind and solar energy and bio-based fuels. The group from Iowa is on a bicycling tour of four states -- Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota and Wisconsin -- to describe the potential for economic development through investments in wind, solar and bio-based fuels. The group leaders are University of Iowa professors DAVID OSTERBERG and TOM COOK and alternative fuels entrepreneur Ed Woolsey.  The tour began Monday in Howard, S.D., and it will end Saturday in Baraboo, Wis. "We're interested in renewable energy," Osterberg said. "Minnesota has been involved in renewable energy, from ethanol, to bio-diesel, to wind and solar power.""We like to talk to people interested in alternative energy," Cook said. "A goal of our bike tour is raising awareness of renewable energy through the media. There are different ways to generate electricity and make us less dependent on international oil. The newspaper serves Fairmont, Minn.
http://fairmontsentinel.com/news/stories/091704a.html

High School Drops Class Rankings (WMAQ-TV, Sept. 16)
Following a trend in many affluent, competitive high schools across the country, Stevenson High School in Lincoln shire, Ill., ended the tradition of naming a valedictorian and salutatorian last year and is asking some colleges to accept applications without a student's rank. Stevenson launched a pilot program this year with eight universities that take many of its students. Instead of getting a student's numerical rank, those schools will receive percentages, such as top 5 percent or top 20 percent. Other schools will continue to get transcripts with numerical rank. MICHAEL BARRON, admissions director at the University of Iowa -- one of the schools participating in the pilot -- said he has seen a definite drop in the number of high schools submitting rank or even percentiles over the past several years. Iowa guarantees admission to out-of-state students who are in the top 30 percent of their class, have a rigorous high school curriculum reviewed by the university and submit applications by Feb. 1. If rank isn't reported or students fall below the 30 percent line, the university takes a holistic approach, considering test scores, GPA, community involvement and other factors. Barron said the move away from rank might cause some students who would have been accepted automatically to be put on a wait list.  "We're used to it, and we're comfortable with it," Barron said of reviewing applications without rank. "The question is whether the high schools and the populations they serve will be comfortable with our decisions." WMAQ (NBC5) is based in Chicago.
The story also appeared in the WORCESTER TELEGRAM in Massachusetts, SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida.
http://www.nbc5.com/education/3736279/detail.html

Andrejevic: Reality TV Is Social (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Sept. 16)
Reality television may be little more than little fibs and fabulous staging, but the shows do reveal a greater truth, whether that's the intention or not. MARK ANDREJEVIC, a University of Iowa professor who teaches a class called "Reality TV in Theory," said watching Burnett's shows is like "watching a Nature Channel for humans," meaning that we can learn about our basic behaviors in these rather contrived settings. Observing how Richard Hatch won the first "Survivor" is more telling than a semester of Psychology 101, and you may have a better understanding of your crazy, ambitious aunt after watching Omarosa on "The Apprentice." The social element appeals to a wide range of viewers, which explains why "Survivor" and "The Apprentice" are watched by so many different ages. Trump said even 12-year-olds come up to him on the street, telling him "you're fired," and running away in a fit of giggles. "'Survivor' really kicked off TV watching as a renewed social activity," Andrejevic said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1706/4974430.html

UI Contributions To Harkin Cited (FrontPageMagazine.com, Sept. 16)
An article about Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin notes that he originally won a seat in Congress with money and support from organized labor, but in recent years his campaign funds have come largely from other sources. During recent election cycles Senator Harkin has pocketed approximately $32,000 in campaign contributions per cycle from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at least $15,000 per cycle from the State of Iowa. This apparently means that Tom Harkin has found a way to coerce Republican as well as Democratic taxpayers to pay for his re-election campaigns through partisan political contributions he is given via the taxpayer-funded University of Iowa and the state government.
http://frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=15094

Local Bar Is Hawkeye Hangout (Arizona Republic, Sept. 16)
A columnist who writes about the local bar/restaurant scene notes that despite the glamorous-sounding name, the Copper Door is a typical sports bar set in a strip mall. This place is a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Hawkeye haven. The first clue is the inflatable Herky mascot on display out front. With a giant Hawk wall, big Hawk banners, flags and signage, this place exudes UI football. Even the bathroom doors flaunt a Herky head. Game-watching specials include homemade Iowa food, a breakfast buffet, Maid-Rites (a glorified sloppy Joe invented in Iowa in 1926) and drink specials. Owners Ray and Claudia Shadid are, needless to say, huge Hawkeye fans and lovers of sports of all kinds.
http://www.azcentral.com/ent/music/articles/0916barfly0916.html

Segura Says Race Is More Than Appearance (Washington Post, Sept. 15)
A hundred social scientists and geneticists gathered this week in Alexandria to sort out the meaning of race, and didn't, quite. The event served as a brainstorming session for a $4 million project, funded by the National Science Foundation and the Ford Foundation, to create a traveling museum exhibit on race. If all goes well, the exhibit will debut in two years at the Science Museum of Minnesota, in St. Paul. The working title is "Understanding Race and Human Variation." If there was a consensus that emerged from two days of conversation, it's the notion that race is a cultural construct. Investigations into the human genome have so far failed to turn up any evidence that there's such a thing as, for example, a Caucasian. Human beings are genetically rather homogeneous compared with other animals. But the lack of biological support for traditional categories of race does not change the fact that race is a lived reality. GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said that people tend to pay far too much attention to just a few of the morphological differences among humans. People vary in dozens of different ways, he said. "We tend to fetishize the shape of the eyes, the shape of the nose, the color of the skin and the texture of the hair," he said. But he made a prediction: If all the experts in the world suddenly announced that there's no such thing as race, and if newspapers ran the story on the front page, it still wouldn't change the way whites and blacks interact in Alabama. A version of this article appeared Sept. 16 in the CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A21995-2004Sep14.html

Men Charged With Counterfeiting At Game (Akron Beacon-Journal, Sept. 15)
Two Cleveland men have been charged with illegally selling T-shirts with the Iowa State University logo on it. Scott Jefferson, 33, and 24-year-old Marcus Hill were arrested in Iowa on Saturday and charged with third-degree intellectual property counterfeiting. Police say Jefferson and Hill sold the T-shirts near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's stadium during the Iowa-Iowa State game. University of Iowa police say the arrest is the first in Iowa City under a new state law. Previously, police only could escort such sellers from university property, he said. The newspaper is based in Ohio. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Sept. 16 on the web site of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and Sept. 15 on two television news web sites in Ohio, NEWSNET5.com and OHIO NEWS NETWORK.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/beaconjournal/news/state/9670511.htm?1c

UI Graduate Prepares For Peace Corps (Ralston Recorder, Sept. 15)
It's a common story: college graduate not sure what she wants to do after graduation. But Elizabeth Meyers found a not-so-common way to handle it. The 2000 Ralston graduate is joining the Peace Corps for a 27-month exercise and experience in the Ukraine. The daughter of former Ralston principal Bob Meyers, Elizabeth graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with degrees in English and theater arts. The newspaper is based in Nebraska.
http://www.ralstonrecorder.com/index.php?u_np=9&u_pg=878&u_sid=1204305

Rizzo Study On Driving, Alzheimer's Cited (Innovations-Report, Sept. 15)
People with mild Alzheimer's disease make more mistakes on a driving test than older people with no cognitive problems, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "There was no difference in the basic control of the vehicle for the people with Alzheimer's," said study author and neurologist MATTHEW RIZZO, MD, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "This leads us to believe that the mental demands of following verbal instructions and navigating a new route can compete with drivers' cognitive resources and potentially impair their driving abilities." The website is based in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.de/html/berichte/medizin_gesundheit/bericht-33568.html

Davidson Comments On Genetic Work (International Herald Tribune, Aug. 15)
If all goes according to plan, about half a dozen elderly people at risk of blindness will receive injections in the whites of their eyes in the coming weeks. The experimental injections will contain a new type of drug based on a recently discovered genetic phenomenon, called RNA interference, that has excited scientists with its versatile and powerful ability to turn off genes. Having quickly become a standard tool for genetic studies in the laboratory, the technique is now set to be tested in people for the first time. Some animal tests have demonstrated the technique's potential. According to a paper published in June, scientists at the F.D.A used RNAi to partly protect mice from lethal flu viruses, including two strains of avian flu that experts worry could become the basis for a new pandemic. BEVERLY L. DAVIDSON and colleagues at the University of Iowa reduced the severity in mice of one type of ataxia, a hereditary brain disease somewhat similar to Huntington's. "It's very exciting," she said, "because we finally have a tool to approach therapies" for diseases like Huntington's and ataxia."
http://www.iht.com/articles/538876.html

Dinosaur Growth Studied at UI (Columbus Dispatch, Sept. 14)
For years, scientists have wondered how Tyrannosaurus rex got so big and how long it took. Did it live long or grow fast? Scientists from the American Museum of Natural History in New York, the Field Museum in Chicago, the Royal Tyrell Museum in Drumheller, Alberta, Florida State University, Stanford University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA recently teamed up to answer those questions. How do you tell how fast an extinct animal grew? One way is to look at the growth rings in its bones. Much like trees, bones add yearly layers. You simply count the layers and you can tell how old the animal was when it died. The newspaper is based in Columbus, Ohio.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9becf43f181311abb591138936d6d49e&_docnum=14&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkVA&_md5=668f51a2906e021c279ff982320e58de

UI Researchers Say Music May Ease Tinnitus (WNEP-TV, Sept. 14)
If you suffer from the condition that causes constant ringing in your ears -- music might help. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS are studying the use of music as a way to help patients find relief from the condition called tinnitus. It's hoped by focusing on the music, tinnitus sufferers might be able to tune out the ringing. The American Tinnitus Association provided a grant for the study. The station is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.wnep.com/Global/story.asp?S=2300459

Davidson Finds Success Using New Technique (New York Times, Sept. 14)
If all goes according to plan, about half a dozen elderly people at risk of blindness will receive injections in the whites of their eyes in the coming weeks. The experimental injections will contain a new type of drug based on a recently discovered genetic phenomenon, called RNA interference, that has excited scientists with its versatile and powerful ability to turn off genes. Having quickly become a standard tool for genetic studies in the laboratory, the technique is now set to be tested in people for the first time. Some animal tests have demonstrated the technique's potential. According to a paper published in June, scientists at the F.D.A used RNAi to partly protect mice from lethal flu viruses, including two strains of avian flu that experts worry could become the basis for a new pandemic. BEVERLY L. DAVIDSON and colleagues at the University of Iowa reduced the severity in mice of one type of ataxia, a hereditary brain disease somewhat similar to Huntington's. "It's very exciting," she said, "because we finally have a tool to approach therapies" for diseases like Huntington's and ataxia." This story also appeared in the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD TRIBUNE, LAKELAND (Fla.) LEDGER and WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/14/business/14gene.html

Rizzo: Drivers With Alzheimer's Make More Errors (New York Times, Sept. 14)
Even after Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed, experts say, many older people with the condition continue to drive. But a study released yesterday suggests that their driving ability should be carefully scrutinized. Writing in the journal Neurology, the researchers said they found that that even people in the early stages of the disease were much more likely to make navigation and safety errors while driving. The researchers, led by Dr. MATTHEW RIZZO of the University of Iowa, compared the performances of 32 drivers with mild Alzheimer's, all of whom still had driver licenses and were regularly on the road, with those of 136 older adults with no known neurological problems. The drivers were instructed to follow a particular route, and they were given a special car equipped with device that monitored their driving performance. In another task, they were asked to drive on a route of their own choosing. Physically, the Alzheimer's patients were as capable of driving as were the other drivers. The problems arose when the drivers with Alzheimer's were told to follow an assigned route. More than 70 percent of them made at least one wrong turn: more than three times the rate for the other group of drivers, the study said. About the same percentage also made driving mistakes like veering out of their lane. This story also appeared on the web site NEWS-MEDICAL WORLD.net. http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/14/health/14agin.html

Murray's Genetic Test Predicts Cleft Palates (Medical News Today, Sept. 14)
Researchers have developed a new genetic test that can help predict whether parents who have one child with the "isolated" form of cleft lip or palate are likely to have a second child with the same birth defect. Isolated clefts account for 70 percent of all cleft lip and palate cases. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences provided funding for the study. All three agencies are components of the National Institutes of Health. The study results appear in the August 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "This study shows that we've reached a point where it's possible to take blood samples from parents, test certain genes, and determine whether their risk for a second child with cleft lip or palate is, say, one percent or 20 percent," said JEFFREY MURRAY, M.D., a scientist at the University of Iowa and senior author on the study. "Now is the time to begin thinking about how best to apply these types of tests clinically and ensure that they truly benefit the families and their children."
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medicalnews.php?newsid=13377

UI Study: Web Sites Help Inform Patients (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Sept. 14)
A new kind of prescription can be filled online, but it does not involve using the Internet to order drugs. Physicians call it an "information prescription," and a new study shows it to be effective in guiding parents toward reliable web sites. The article, published in The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, said a large body of research had found that well-informed patients tended to do better. In the new study, about half of 197 parents of patients at the pediatric clinic of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA were randomly chosen to receive a short session of Internet training and an information prescription.
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04258/378480.stm

Rietz Says Bush IEM Futures, S&P 500 Connected (Barrons, Sept. 13)
Contract prices on two leading political futures markets -- places where you can buy securities that pay off if either President George Bush or Sen. John Kerry win -- have followed much the same pattern of the broader market indexes, but often in advance of them. Right now, both the Iowa Electronic Markets, operated by the University of Iowa, and Trade Exchange Networks' Website Intrade.com, run from Ireland, give Bush a clear lead over Kerry -- possibly presaging continued strength in the market. "There is a relationship between the stock market and how well Bush is doing in our market," says THOMAS RIETZ, a University of Iowa finance professor who serves on the Electronic Markets' board of directors. When Bush futures rise, so rises the S&P 500. In fact, a one percent increase in the probability of a Bush victory in the Iowa Markets corresponds on average to an increase of 6.96 points in the S&P, he says. Alternatively, every 10 point decline in the S&P 500 decreases the probability of a Bush win in the Iowa Markets by 1.44 percent, according to Rietz. In other words, the link between Bush and the market is clearly symbiotic: Just as Bush's rise in the polls may help the market, shifts in the market clearly can influence the incumbent's prospects.
http://online.barrons.com/article/SB109486851420115274.html

Holub Comments On US Airways, Bankruptcy (Charlotte Observer, Sept. 13)
US Airways engaged in a flurry of labor talks with three key unions Friday as the clock ticked down to a possible bankruptcy filing as soon as Sunday. A second bankruptcy filing since 2002 wouldn't ground US Airways, but some experts say it may eventually lead to the airline's demise. For months, the nation's seventh-largest airline has sought to wrest $800 million in annual concessions from its unions in an effort to avoid a second bankruptcy. But the immediate threat of another filing seemed to bring a renewed sense of urgency to labor talks. "Of course it encourages the parties to want to talk more," said DAN HOLUB, director of The University of Iowa Labor Center. "Once you're in bankruptcy, you're in the unknown, where a court has the power ultimately to void the contract or order concessions. "It's a big stick for the airline industry to use," Holub said. The paper is based in North Carolina.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/living/travel/9640259.htm

Murray's Cleft Palate Research Cited (Innovations-Report, Sept. 13)
Researchers have developed a new genetic test that can help predict whether parents who have one child with the "isolated" form of cleft lip or palate are likely to have a second child with the same birth defect. Isolated clefts account for 70 percent of all cleft lip and palate cases. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences provided funding for the study. All three agencies are components of the National Institutes of Health. The study results appear in the August 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "This study shows that we've reached a point where it's possible to take blood samples from parents, test certain genes, and determine whether their risk for a second child with cleft lip or palate is, say, one percent or 20 percent," said JEFFREY MURRAY, M.D., a scientist at the University of Iowa and senior author on the study. "Now is the time to begin thinking about how best to apply these types of tests clinically and ensure that they truly benefit the families and their children." The website is based in Germany.
http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/life_sciences/report-33461.html

Segura: Most Calif. Cities Use At-Large Elections (Desert Sun, Sept. 12)
In California, most cities elect their council members through an at-large process, said GARY SEGURA, an associate professor of American politics at the University of Iowa. That's how Indio and Cathedral City do it. That means all residents of the city vote for the candidates who will represent them on a council. An informal survey conducted by the League of California Cities last year showed that only about 20 of the state's 478 cities elect city leaders by districts or wards. Bakersfield, Downey, Long Beach and Watsonville are just some of the cities in California that elect city leaders to represent certain areas of the city, using districts. The paper is based in Palm Springs, Calif.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories2004/election/20040912012810.shtml

Segura: Latino Leaders Held Back By Lack Of Money (Desert Sun, Sept. 12)
Latinos looking to run for city council may need more than leadership qualities and a willingness to take on the establishment. They also may need campaign funds to be successful. Financial resources do play a role in holding back Latino leaders, said GARY SEGURA, an associate professor of American politics at the University of Iowa. Often, those seeking elected office have to have substantial personal wealth, he said. The paper is based in Palm Springs, Calif.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories2004/local/20040912015905.shtml

Segura: Incumbency, Doubts Thwart Latino Candidates (Desert Sun, Sept. 12)
In a valley where Latinos are a significant part of the landscape, two cities with at least half-Latino populations lack any Latino representation on their city councils. Some residents of Indio and Cathedral City say there should be Latinos on each council to reflect the 75 percent and 50 percent Latino population that each city boasts, respectively. In contrast, the city of Coachella, which is 97 percent Latino, has four out of five elected leaders who are Latino. A number of factors work against Latinos seeking public office for the first time, including incumbency and doubts about their chances for success.

Latinos may not run for office because they don't think that they can win, said GARY SEGURA, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. The paper is based in Palm Springs, Calif.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories2004/local/20040912033408.shtml

UI Cited In Story On Indiana Enrollment (Indianapolis Star, Sept. 12)
Enrollment at Indiana's four largest public college campuses dipped this fall, while the state's least expensive four-year university and two-year college pulled in more students. While its system-wide enrollment decreased less than one percent, Indiana University isn't pleased with the decline, mostly among freshmen in Bloomington. The biggest reason, IU Bloomington Chancellor Kenneth Gros Louis said, may have been getting out financial aid notices too late to prospective freshmen, who looked elsewhere. Even though IU has doubled its scholarships to $30 million in the past five years, he said, financial aid packages weren't as high as those of some competitors, such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. That's what a survey of students who didn't enroll indicated.
http://www.indystar.com/articles/3/178028-7743-103.html

Memoir Author Attended UI (KGW-TV, Sept. 11)
A few years after her father's death, author Maura Conlon-McIvor began navigating the bureaucracy necessary to extricate his personnel files from his old employer, the FBI. When the thick stack finally arrived, the Portland-based Conlon-McIvor hoped that here, finally, lay the center of the man whose code she'd spent her life trying to decipher, succeeding in just fits and starts. Instead, she found page after page where thick, black lines obscured crucial details. In the end, she could glean not much more than his personnel and medical evaluations. Her search for the man who came home every day to her family's Southern California home in his black FBI car, golden cartridge cases still strewn across the trunk, is at the core of Conlon-McIvor's new memoir, "FBI Girl: How I Learned to Crack My Father's Code," (Warner Books, 306 pages). Her path to her memoir was an unlikely one. She majored in communications at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then decamped for New York, where she spent a brief period working at The New Yorker, and at travel magazines. The state is based in Portland, Ore.
http://www.kgw.com/sharedcontent/APStories/stories/D851KQ700.html

Andrejevic Comments On News Watching (Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Sept. 11)
More than 80 percent of Texans say there is too much profanity, violence and sexual content on television, according to the Scripps Howard Texas Poll. And 45 percent say they watch much less or somewhat less television than they did five years ago. Twenty-seven percent watch much more or somewhat more television and 28 percent watch the same amount. Also, more Texans watch news programs more often than any other programming. "It's an election year, so obviously there is a high interest in the news," said MARK ANDREJEVIC, an assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa. "There is also this explosion in cable news. News is on all the time. What other programming is on 24 hours a day?" The paper is based in Texas. A version of the story also ran on the website of the BROWNSVILLE HERALD in Texas. http://www.caller.com/ccct/local_news/article/0,1641,CCCT_811_3175189,00.html

Peters Quoted On Enterprise Zone Ineffectiveness (CNN, Sept. 10)
In his column Lou Dobbs writes about so-called enterprise or opportunity zones that provide prospective companies tax breaks for moving into a particular area and which politicians often tout as economic cures. He quotes ALAN PETERS, professor of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Iowa, who has studied the effectiveness of such zones and says economic development incentives on the whole haven't had much success, either in revitalizing cities or promoting growth in rural areas. "If there had been massive evidence that either enterprise communities or empowerment zones had been hugely successful," he said, "then maybe we should get excited. But there hasn't been." The affected areas usually have poor infrastructure, high crime, and may be far from a main transportation network, Peters noted. "The idea that a federal subsidy is going to really change that is just mistaken."
http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/09/09/land.opportunity/

Nelson Comments On Political Market Accuracy (MSNBC.com, Sept. 10)
In addition to offering traders the chance to make or lose money on the race for the White House -- or a host of other races or "proposition bets" being offered -- there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the political futures markets offer a more accurate picture of political races than polls. The markets work the same way that the pari-mutuel system works at the racetrack, where the crowd is better at picking winning horses than any individual handicapper, said FORREST NELSON, co-director of the Iowa Electronic Markets at the University of Iowa. "It's the wisdom-of-the-crowd argument," said Nelson, an economics professor at the university's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, which has been running a political futures market since 1988. "No one person understands very much and the nature of their information is very different. (The markets) fail when there is no information out there or the traders don't have access to the information. But if the information is out there and just spread around, the markets have a good chance of getting it right."
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/5943565/

Enrollment Drops At State Universities (WQAD-TV, Sept. 10)
Some officials blamed major tuition increases over the past few years and a drop in Iowa high school graduates for a drop in undergraduate enrollment reported by the three state universities this week. Officials this week reported that the University of Northern Iowa's enrollment dropped by 4.7 percent, ISU's fell 3.9 percent, and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials cited a drop of one-half of one percent. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2282628

UI Noted In Iowa Travel Story (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 10)
In a review of Iowa attractions, a travel writer says she stayed at the Sheraton in Iowa City "chiefly because of its location: It's at one end of Dubuque Street, a pedestrian mall that, with side streets College and Washington, is the hub of downtown life and an easy walk to THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The university is home to the famed Iowa Writers' Workshop, where Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Philip Roth and John Cheever have taught and whose graduates have included Wallace Stegner and Flannery O'Connor. Small wonder that the city takes pride in its literary heritage."
http://www.latimes.com/travel/la-tr-iowa12sep12,1,3307722.story?coll=la-travel-headlines

Writers' Workshop Graduate Presents Seminar (Coshocton Tribune, Sept. 9)
Doug Swift will present a workshop for beginners on writing memoirs Sept. 22, at Coshocton Public Library. Swift has a master of arts degree from Johns Hopkins Writing Seminars, and an master of fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The paper is based in Ohio.
http://www.coshoctontribune.com/news/stories/20040909/localnews/1204948.html

Mom Braves Hurricane With Daughter (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 9)
In the days as hurricane Frances crept closer, Vicky McGinnis, a senior at the University of Central Florida, had tried with increasing desperation to find a flight home to Iowa. When she couldn't, her mother Dorothy McGinnis decided to fly here. In 1991, the family began visiting Walt Disney World at least once a year, and in Vicky's sophomore year of college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA she landed an internship there, doing costuming. Eventually she transferred to UCF. The story also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/lifestyle/orl-momdaughter090904sep09,0,7531153.story?coll=orl-home-entlife

Dorale Studies Stalagmites (National Geographic, September 2004)
JEFF DORALE
, assistant professor in the UI Department of Geoscience, is pictured holding a stalagmite from Crevice Cave in Missouri, as part of the feature article, "Global Warning: Bulletins from a Warmer World." The photo cutline reads: "By measuring isotopes of uranium, as well as mud embedded in the slow-growing stalagmites, Dorale and colleagues believe they can link El Nino events to flooding in the cave and higher rainfall over the past 10,000 years."

Writer Discusses UI Summer Writing Experience (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 9)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA initiated the Iowa Writer's Workshop in 1922, which makes it the oldest graduate writing program anywhere. It is also the most prestigious. Graduates of the Iowa Writer's Workshop include Raymond Carver, Flannery O'Connor, John Irving, Jane Smiley and Wallace Stegner. The teachers are just as illustrious. Familiar names such as Robert Frost, Philip Roth, Kurt Vonnegut, John Cheever and Gail Godwin have been on the faculty. The Summer Writing Festival offers workshops in beginning and advanced poetry, memoirs, novel writing and nonfiction. The topics are specialized into "Story Structure for the Screen," "Getting to the Deeper Story," "The Second Draft" and more specific workshops about different genres of writing.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/pilot/features/la-dpt-traveltales09sep09,1,4041794.story

Regents To Consider Tuition, Funding Plans (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 9)
The Iowa Board of Regents will consider offering a deal to the state's legislature: Boost funding for higher education, and the regents will tie tuition increases to inflation. The board is expected to consider the plan at its regular meeting next week, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Under the proposal by its Public Policy Task Force, the regents would ask the Legislature to commit to adding $40 million for state institutions starting in 2006 and continuing for three years after that. If the Legislature agrees to the plan, "we can have consistent tuition," said Regent David Neil of La Porte City. If the Legislature doesn't "meet its obligations, it will be up to us and the university presidents to keep the institutions afloat," Neil said. In exchange for the funding, the regents would hold tuition to the rate of inflation, although they have not specified what index would be used.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_pg=1640&u_sid=1198129

UI Allergy Study Cited (Joplin Globe, Sept. 9)
It's allergy season, and for some, this year is worse than others. "We've had favorable growing conditions for just about anything this year, whether you are growing corn or ragweed," said Dennis Elbrader, the Cherokee County, Kan., Extension agent. "We haven't had growing conditions this good in years. The moisture has been good, the temperatures good, and the ragweed, along with all the other weeds, have fared real well this year." People can take the old standby medications to treat allergies like Benadryl and others, but some doctors don't recommend them because they cause drowsiness. Invariably, people say they can take Benadryl without getting drowsy, but there have been good studies by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that say they may not be drowsy, but it still affects and slows their reflexes. The Globe is based in Joplin, Mo.
http://www.joplinglobe.com/story.php?story_id=130297&c=87

UConn Hiring To Compete with UI (NBC30, Sept. 9)
In an effort to stack up better against comparable colleges, the University of Connecticut plans to decrease its student-teacher ratio by hiring 150 more faculty members. The hirings, to be spread out over five years, would allow the university to drop the ratio from 18 students per teacher to 16 students per teacher. The average student ratio for eight comparable colleges is 15-to-1. Of the universities UConn considers to be in its peer group is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. NBC30 is based in Connecticutt. The same story appeared on the web sits of the STAMFORD ADVOCATE, HARTFORD COURANT and NEWSDAY.
http://www.nbc30.com/education/3717006/detail.html

Alumnus Is Oregon City Planning Director (The Oregonian, Sept. 9)
Marion Hemphill says he would like to build himself out of a job. That would mean Hillsboro has finally caught up with the demand for city services. But Hemphill isn't optimistic that's going to happen any time soon. At the moment, Hemphill, Hillsboro's capital planning and development director, is in the final stages of overseeing construction of the city's new civic center. Hillsboro is a 1974 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.oregonlive.com/metrowest/oregonian/hillsboro/index.ssf?/base/metro_west_news/1094299414270761.xml

Alumnus Honored By California University (Eureka Reporter, Sept. 9)
It was an art professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who introduced Ellen Land-Weber to the magic of capturing -- and creating -- images. Since then, she has used a range of cameras. Of course, they've included standbys such as 35mm single-lens reflex cameras, medium- and large-format cameras, and now digital cameras. She's shot through scanning electron microscopes. She's used Xerox copiers -- "which are cameras in a way," she said. For the extensive legacy of photographic excellence, Land-Weber, a Humboldt State University professor of art since 1974, will be honored as the university's Scholar of the Year for 2004, the university's premier award recognizing outstanding research and creative endeavors.
http://www.eurekareporter.com/Stories/cm-09080413.htm

Carmichael's Program To Track Pollution (NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Sept. 8)
GREG CARMICHAEL
, University of Iowa professor of chemical and biochemical engineering, was interviewed as part of a story about tracking pollution over the Atlantic Ocean. Carmichael has developed a computer model that locates plumes of pollutants spreading from New England over the Atlantic Ocean, then tells research planes and ships investigating the plumes where to go.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/environment/july-dec04/pollution_09-07.html

Student Alcohol Death At UI Recalled (Denver Post, Sept. 8)
A list of student alcohol-related deaths includes Matthew Garofalo, who died in September 1995 after chugging from a bottle of whiskey during a Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity pledge ceremony at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36~53~2386528,00.html

Segura Comments On Rising Death Toll In Iraq (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 8)
The number of American troops killed in Iraq has hit the 1,000 mark, a grim milestone that analysts say is likely to raise new questions about the U.S. involvement there during the presidential campaign. While Sen. John Kerry stepped up his criticism of the Iraq war on the campaign trail Tuesday and President Bush continued to defend the conflict, analysts who have studied the effect of casualties on public opinion said the death toll's political significance is uncertain. Four states eyed by Republicans and Democrats as potentially pivotal to the election have endured more than their share of war deaths on a per capita basis, a Tribune analysis shows. The number of deaths per million residents is among the highest in Arizona, Iowa, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. GARY SEGURA, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said the fact that nearly one-fifth of the war deaths have come from National Guard and reserve units could mean that the death toll will have a stronger political effect. "There can be a far bigger local effect in casualties," he said. "If a kid dies from your home town, that's a much bigger deal, because you don't have to make a very big leap from that kid to your own kid." Versions of the story also ran on the websites of the DULUTH (Minn.) NEWS TRIBUNE, SAN LUIS OBISPO (Calif.) TRIBUNE, BILOXI (Miss.) SUN HERALD, COLUMBUS (Ga.) LEDGER-ENQUIRER, MACON (Ga.) TELEGRAPH, TALLAHASSEE.COM in Florida, KENTUCKY.COM in Kentucky, CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, BRADENTON (Fla.) HERALD, MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS, the MONTEREY COUNTY (Calif.) HERALD and many other media outlets.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0409080295sep08,1,5390014.story?coll=chi-newsnationworld-hed

Child Pulled From Burning Building Treated At UI (WQAD-TV, Sept. 7)
A four-year-old Davenport boy shows signs of improvement after being pulled from a burning building last weekend. Angel Barba is in stable condition at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS. He was taken off life support and started breathing on his own on Monday. His mom Mabel and five-year-old brother were treated and released the night of the fire. Angel's uncle, 32-year-old, Caesar Diaz was released yesterday. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2270156&nav=1sW7Qfeu

D'Alessandro Steers Parents To Reliable Web Sites (New York Times, Sept. 7)
A new kind of prescription can be filled online, but it does not involve using the Internet to order drugs. Physicians call it an information prescription, and a study released yesterday found it to be effective in guiding parents toward reliable Web sites. The article, published in The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, said a large body of research had found that well-informed patients tended to do better. In the new study, about half of 197 parents of patients at the pediatric clinic of the University of Iowa were randomly chosen to receive a short session of Internet training and an information prescription. Dr. DONNA M. D'ALESSANDRO, the lead researcher, said that since parents were already getting so much of their health information over the Internet, discussions about good sites should become a routine part of pediatric visits.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/health/07prac.html

UI Doctor Recommends 'Information Prescriptions' (Washington Times, Sept. 7)
For those having trouble finding quality health information on the Internet, doctors can write a web prescription. A University of Iowa study, reported in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, shows numerous benefits of steering patients to quality health information on the Internet. "We hear from patients and families that they're having trouble finding good healthcare information on the Internet, and we hear from healthcare providers that they think the families they treat are using some questionable information," said principal investigator Dr. DONNA D'ALESSANDRO of the University of Iowa. "Using Internet prescriptions to guide families to good information will help solve these problems for both groups." A version of this UPI article appeared Sept. 7 on the web site of MEDICAL NEWS TODAY (UK).
http://washingtontimes.com/upi-breaking/20040906-013929-8585r.htm

D'Alessandro Comments On Internet Health Information (CBC News, Sept. 7)
If you're having trouble finding high-quality health information on the Internet, try asking your doctor for a list of recommended websites. Researchers at the University of Iowa say "information prescriptions" are a quick, no-cost way to guide parents to websites recommended by pediatricians. To test the value of the idea, doctors randomly assigned 97 parents to receive an information prescription before their child's regular office visit. About two to three weeks after the appointment, Dr. DONNA D'ALESSANDRO, a professor of pediatrics at the university, and her colleagues telephoned both groups to ask about their use of the Internet. "Quality health sites on the Internet are from a reputable source, including reputable authors, and the sites are not trying to advertise or sell a cure," said D'Alessandro. "In addition, the sites have dates on them so you know how current the information is."
http://www.cbc.ca/story/science/national/2004/09/06/doc_web040906.html

Gurnett Using Radio Signals To Study Saturn (NewsOK.com, Sept. 7)
Measuring the rotation of, say, Earth, from space is simple. Find some landmark on the surface and measure the time it takes that feature to go around the planet. That's not possible on a planet with no visible land features and 1,100 mph winds. So, scientists listen to the natural radio signals emanating from Saturn. The idea is that the radio signals are locked to Saturn and rotate with the planet. Dr. DON GURNETT, principal investigator for the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument, University of Iowa, Iowa City, said, "The technique is particularly useful for the giant gas planets, such as Jupiter and Saturn, which have no surfaces and are covered by clouds that make direct visual measurements impossible."
http://newsok.com/article/1311250/?template=news/main

Tyler Tries Music To Aid Tinnitus Patients (KING5.com, Sept. 7)
Growing up on a farm left Bill Landers with a lifetime of memories. "I drove my first tractor at seven. I had my first major wreck at 13," he said. The loud farm equipment may have left him with a lifetime of tinnitus. "There is a continual, 24 hours a day, seven days a week buzzing going on," he said. Now Bill hopes another sound will quiet the noise. University of Iowa audiologist RICH TYLER is studying whether music can help. The idea is to give patients control over the sound by shifting their focus. "What we are trying to do is to move the people from the group that are seriously disabled by tinnitus into a group where they are not bothered by it," said Tyler. The television news station is based in Seattle, Wash.
http://www.king5.com/health/stories/NW_090604HE_KING_tinnitusSW.ee88f250.html

UI Study Notes Success Of Muskie Program (St. Petersburg Times, Sept. 7)
There are not many scholarships available specifically for Russians interested in studying in the United States, but for the past 12 years, the Edmund Muskie/ Freedom Support Act Graduate Fellowship has been supporting Russian students wishing to complete their graduate studies at some of America's top universities. According to the evaluation report on the program conducted by the Iowa Social Science Institute (ISSI) at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 2000 for the State Department, the Muskie program "has been successful in fostering the career development of individuals." The study reported that the program participants moved at greater rates into key sectors of the economy, especially in business, with most alumni working in banking and financial services fields. The newspaper is based in Russia.
http://www.sptimes.ru/archive/times/1001/sb/s_13480.htm

UI Defibrillator Study Cited (Rochester Democrat & Chronicle, Sept. 7)
Since the mid-1990s automated external defibrillators have steadily made their way into government buildings, malls and sports and entertainment venues. New York, one of the leading states on this issue, has required AEDs in public schools. Soon, AEDs will also be required in large health clubs and state government offices. Some school officials and business owners have questioned whether it's worth it to spend an average $2,000 on each AED when out-of-hospital sudden-cardiac-arrest deaths nationwide could affect only 250,000 to 460,000 Americans every year. But more private businesses are buying AEDs -- without anyone requiring them to do so. A 2003 study by doctors from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Michigan found that of patients shocked by public AEDs within four and a half minutes, 25 percent will survive.
http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040907/NEWS01/409070313/1002/NEWS

Polumbaum Comments On Olympic Media Coverage (Beijing Youth Daily, Sept. 6)
In an article analyzing coverage of the 2004 Summer Olympic Games in Athens by Chinese and U.S. media, JUDY POLUMBAUM, professor of journalism and mass communication, comments on U.S. media coverage. Polumbaum conducts research on representation of sport in U.S and Chinese media and is collaborating with scholars at China Renmin University.
http://sports.ynet.com/athens2004/view.jsp?oid=3733274 (the article is in Chinese)

Hunnicutt: Labor Day Has Been Eroded (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 6)
While economists don't keep track of how many people work on the holiday itself, they say the many jobs that require staffing on Labor Day are proof that Americans work increasingly odd hours. Memorialized as a federal holiday in 1894, Labor Day was revered in union halls and on factory floors as one of the crowning achievements of organized labor. Few people worked on Labor Day. Instead, there were parades where union officials celebrated victories such as paid holidays, vacations and work-free weekends. Labor leaders still hold the day sacrosanct. But most Americans now view it as a time to shop and vacation. And to make that possible, workers are needed to service the 34.1 million Americans expected to hit the highways and airways and ring up an estimated $3.5 billion in retail sales during the holiday. A 2003 report by the International Labor Organization found that Americans worked longer hours than Europeans, with the average American putting in 1,815 hours a year on the job compared with 1,300 to 1,800 in industrialized European economies. But not all economists agree that Americans work more than they used to. Thanks to technologies like the microwave and home washing machines, a 1993 study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas found that Americans enjoy more leisure time than ever. That's not a view shared by BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a University of Iowa professor who's so devoted to the idea of Americans taking more time off that he teaches leisure studies. "Labor Day is just one of many forms of free time that has been eroded," he said. "We regard work as the center of life." A version of this article also appeared Sept. 6 on the web site of the HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0409060108sep06,1,6817740.story?coll=chi-business-hed

Blanck Comments On Disabled Employment (Florida Today, Sept. 6)
Twelve years after the Americans with Disabilities Act declared illegal employment discrimination against the disabled, a Harris poll found the percentage of disabled adults with jobs stuck at about 35 percent. That's nearly identical to the percentage in a 1986 Harris survey. Critics of the ADA say the cost of compliance has made employers wary of hiring disabled workers. However, advocates for the disabled downplay the employment participation statistic as misleading because it includes disabled adults -- many of them older -- unable or unwilling to work. Experts on the disabled say they've seen positive employment gains, many of them among young adults. "Young people who have severe disabilities who want to work, who are capable of being accommodated, their employment rate has risen dramatically," said PETER BLANCK, director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa College of Law. (The article erroneously cites "David Blanck.") Versions of this article also appeared Sept. 5 on the web sites of the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, HONOLULU ADVERTISER, and COURIER POST in New Jersey.
http://www.floridatoday.com/!NEWSROOM/moneystoryB0906DISABLED.htm

Fleiss: Film Showing Virus Attack Is Creepy (Dallas Morning News, Sept. 5)
Using a creature as hideous as any sci-fi monster, scientists have produced a one-minute horror movie starring a menacing, spidery virus swooping in on a hapless blob of bacteria. The computer-generated short arose from research that could help scientists find new ways to combat viruses that cause everything from AIDS to the common cold. With help from computer animation, the movie shows the virus latching onto an E. coli bacterium and giving it an injection of DNA that turns it into a virus factory. "It's the most detailed picture   yet of how any virus attaches to a cell and what happens immediately after that to get the virus' chromosomes in," said MICHAEL FEISS, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa. Feiss said that his normally restrained microbiologist colleagues burst into applause when the film was shown at two recent scientific gatherings. He called the movie "creepy." A version of this article also appeared Sept. 5 on WFAA.com in Texas.
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/news/healthscience/stories/090604dnlivviralmovie.d067.html

Kaboli Studies Hospitalist Effectiveness (American Medical News, Sept. 5)
Patients treated by hospitalists had shorter hospital stays and paid less for hospital services than patients treated by non-hospitalists, a new study shows. Patients cared for by hospitalists averaged one day less in the hospital and had a 10 percent reduction in costs. Researchers said the Iowa study adds to a growing body of research showing the effectiveness of hospitalist care. "It does support previous studies that show an increase in efficiency [by hospitalists]. Getting patients out sooner opens that bed that much sooner for the next person," said PETER KABOLI, MD, lead study author and assistant professor at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.
http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2004/09/13/prsg0913.htm

UI Graduate Is AmeriCorps Volunteer (North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, Sept. 5)
An article about local AmeriCorps volunteers notes that Kristin Martin del Campo is serving the Children's Cabinet of Incline Village. "I just graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where I majored in exercise science and minored in global health and Spanish," she said. Del Campo will be the agency's health advocate, serving at its clinic and in the office, recruiting volunteers and raising money for the Children's Cabinet. She also will be taking over the dental outreach program.
http://www.tahoebonanza.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040905/News/109050013

U Of Florida President Is UI Alumnus (Miami Herald, Sept. 5)
An "at a glance" profile of University of Florida President J. Bernard Machen notes that he earned his master of science in pediatric dentistry and Ph.D. in educational psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. This piece also appeared Sept. 5 on the web sites of the BRADENTON HERALD, THE LEDGER, SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, SUN-SENTINEL, DAYTONA BEACH NEWS-JOURNAL, and TALLAHASSEE.com, all in Florida.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/state/9589427.htm

Charged Doctor Was UI Resident (Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Sept. 5)
James Bischoff has been charged in Madison County District Court with deliberate homicide for allegedly giving injections that ended the life of 85-year-old Kathryn Dvarishkis in July 2000. The doctor, who earned his medical degree from the University of Minnesota Medical School, has been sued for malpractice twice in civil court over the past few years. After Bischoff earned his medical degree, he completed his residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, then worked in the emergency room at several hospitals in Iowa.
http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/articles/2004/09/05/news/01death.txt

Fisher Comments On Enterprise Zones (Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, Sept. 4)
Six years into the Keystone Opportunity Zone program -- which gives generous state and local tax breaks intended to spur economic development -- most of the more than 6,000 acres designated across Southwestern Pennsylvania sit fallow. Thousands of new jobs predicted at the program's inception in 1998 have failed to materialize. PETER S. FISHER, a University of Iowa professor who co-authored the 1998 book "State Enterprise Zone Programs: Do They Work?" calls such geographic-specific tax-break programs marginal economic development drivers. Regional differences in labor and energy costs are usually more significant than tax breaks, Fisher said. "You just don't have that much leverage when you can only affect tax costs," he said. "You often just give tax breaks to firms who would have been there anyway."
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/tribune-review/business/s_248100.html

Grant Comments On Women's Athletics (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 3)
U.S. women's teams performed magnificently at the recently concluded Athens Olympics, taking gold in softball, soccer and basketball. Why does a nation that easily embraces women's team sports in the Olympics summarily reject them when it comes to professional leagues at home? CHRISTINE GRANT, retired women's athletic director at the University of Iowa, believes the reason female teams don't prosper is simple: the clock and the wallet. "Women's collegiate teams have the same problem that women's professional teams do," she said. "Real sports fans have already made their commitments. Men have society so well trained over 100 years to make collegiate and professional sports for men a priority in the calendar." A Chicagoan, for instance, who already follows the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, White Sox or Cubs, along with a local college team, is unlikely to have the time or money to pursue yet another pro team -- be its players male or female. "You'd have to practically take out a mortgage," Grant said ruefully. Hence women's teams, both pro and college, must develop new fans, she added. "People with young families, senior citizens" are among the target audiences. "Women offer a different option." Yet Grant, who worked in sports at Iowa for almost three decades, knows that savvy marketing isn't the only answer. "There still is the lingering belief by many people in our society," she said, "that men's sports is worth watching way more than women's sports."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0409030188sep03,1,645010.story?coll=chi-leisuretempo-hed

Gronbeck Comments On 9-11 References (San Diego Union-Tribune, Sept. 3)
From start to finish, inside Madison Square Garden and outside, the Republican convention was steeped in the memory of the worst terrorist attack in the nation's history. Many Republicans view the response to Sept. 11 as Bush's finest hour -- and the key to his re-election. But convention organizers walked a fine line between using Sept. 11 to bolster Bush's leadership credentials and outright political exploitation of a national tragedy. Several experts in political communication said that, with a few exceptions, they didn't think the Republicans had crossed that line. "I don't think there will be a backlash," said BRUCE GRONBECK, a political expert at the University of Iowa's Department of Communication Studies. The story also appeared on the COPLEY NEWS SERVICE.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20040903-9999-1n3attacks.html

Redlawsk Notes Absentee Voting Efforts (WQAD-TV, Sept. 3)
Both parties are taking the 'absentee' out of absentee ballots this fall, looking to maximize votes now rather than wait to take their chances on November 3. Iowa GOP spokeswoman Kristin Scuderi says absentee ballots "are good, because once you have those, the vote is already banked." It's a lesson the Republicans learned from the 2000 election when President Bush lost to Al Gore by just 4,144 votes. That year, DAVID REDLAWSK, University of Iowa political science professor, says more Iowa absentee voters went for Al Gore than George Bush. He says Gore "actually lost on election day, but he won Iowa due to absentee balloting." WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2253491

UI Graduate's Performance Reviewed (San Francisco Bay View, Sept. 3)
As part of a 2001 review of a Jazz Week in San Francisco, a reviewer noted singer Patricia Barber "who surprised me with her incredible craft and witty, if not flamboyant, lyrical playfulness. Sporting a classical music background from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, along with psychology, Barber's explanations sent more than one mind on a treadmill ride."
http://www.sfbayview.com/090104/wandaspicks090104.shtml

UI Press Faces Budget Cuts ((WQAD-TV, Sept. 3)
Researchers are worried about looming budget cuts on the future of the University of Iowa Press, home to published scholarly work and literature for 35 years. The press, one of about 125 university presses nationwide, publishes about 35 books a year, as well as poetry and short fiction. Some university employees say the proposed cuts would result in the press publishing less research at a time when such publications are increasingly important in getting job promotions in academia. A task force has recommended cutting $200,000, or about 15 percent of its budget, as one of many cost-saving measures. University Press director HOLLY CARVER says the proposed cuts would result in the layoffs of seven full-time employees and the reduction of titles published from 35 to 20. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=2251374

Conroy Returning To Teaching (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 3)
FRANK CONROY, head of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, will give up the post next summer. Mr. Conroy, 68, who had surgery for colon cancer last year, will return to teaching.
http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i02/02a00801.htm

Pitt To Offer Same-Sex Benefits (KDKA-TV, Sept.  2)
The University of Pittsburgh has agreed to offer health benefits to same-sex partners, ending eight years of legal wrangling over coverage for employees. According to a report this year by the Human Rights Campaign, in 2003 there were 196 colleges and universities offering some form of domestic partner benefits, up from 182 in 2002; the number included Drexel and Temple universities in Philadelphia. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA began offering same-sex benefits in 1993 and found that the cost of insuring gay couples to be less than that of insuring heterosexual couples, according to university officials there. KDKA is based in Pittsburgh, Pa.
http://kdka.com/local/localnewspitt_story_246135534.html

Lewis-Beck Explains Poll, Market Discrepancy (Contra Costa Times, Sept. 2)
While public opinion polls show the presidential election is too close to call, most electronic markets, such as the Iowa Electronic Market, predict a Bush victory. MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, says the discrepancy between polls and economic forecasts might arise because forecasts don't measure how people feel about the economy. "If you look at economic growth, three percent or so, that's not telling you about the increasing job insecurity people have, either because they're unemployed or underemployed," says Lewis-Beck. The newspaper is based in California. This article originally appeared on Bloomberg News.
http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/9561599.htm

UI Same-Sex Benefits Plan Cited (Centre Daily Times, Sept. 2)
The University of Pittsburgh has agreed to offer health benefits to same-sex partners, ending eight years of legal wrangling over coverage for employees. The state-affiliated university's decision to offer benefits to same-sex partners was included in an eight-page memo sent to employees Wednesday. The benefits will be offered starting Jan. 1. Chancellor Mark Nordenberg noted that 80 percent of schools in the Association of American Universities offer domestic partner benefits and two-thirds of Fortune 100 companies also extend the benefits to domestic partners. Both are potential competitors for University of Pittsburgh employees, he said. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA began offering same-sex benefits in 1993 and found that the cost of insuring gay couples to be less than that of insuring heterosexual couples, according to university officials there. An internal study by Pitt found that it would cost less than one percent of current spending to extend health care to gay and lesbian partners. The newspaper is based in Pennsylvania. Versions of this Associated Press article also appeared Sept. 2 on the web sites of the WASHINGTON (Pa.) OBSERVER-REPORTER, PENN LIVE, the PITTSBURGH CHANNEL and NEPA NEWS.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/sports/horse_racing/kentucky_derby/9561739.htm

Alumnus Running For Congress (Seattle Times, Sept. 2)
An article about a local Congressional race notes that one of the Republican candidates, James Whitfield, holds a bachelor's degree in communications from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Whitfield, a 33-year-old executive with a nonprofit health-care organization who grew up in a poor single-parent family, says that while he is relying on his own sweat, his opponent is using family connections to fuel his bid.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/eastsidenews/2002023616_48thdistrict30e.html

UI Asphalt Recycling Studies Noted (KTVO-TV, Sept. 2)
Recycling is big nowadays, even in street repair. "We're taking old existing asphalt paving and we're grinding it up," said Bill Kahl, owner of W.K. Construction out of Middleton, Wis. While it sounds technical, cold-in-place asphalt reclamation is basically recycling the existing pavement to cut down on the cost of new material and hauling material to the site. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State have done significant studies on cold-in place and have found it to be a very cost effective rehabilitation technique for old asphalt pavements," said Kahl. The station is based in Missouri.
http://www.ktvotv3.com/Global/story.asp?S=2249180&nav=1LFsQUmb

Alumnus Bringing 'No Shame' To Virginia College (Augusta Free Press, Sept. 2)
Sometimes it's good to have no shame. At least this is the philosophy of Mary Baldwin College faculty member Todd Ristau. Ristau opened the first No Shame Theater on the back of his pickup truck while studying at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1986. The rules for participating in No Shame were simple -- the pieces performed had to be original, short (five minutes or less), and no one was allowed to break anything. Aside from that, it was anything goes on the live mic -- from poetry to comedy to drama to juggling to whatever else came to mind. Ristau is bringing No Shame to MBC and Staunton beginning Sept. 6. The newspaper is based in Virginia.
http://www.augustafreepress.com/stories/storyReader$25675

Organ Recipient Now Senior At UI (Chicago Sun-Times, Sept. 1)
Fifty years ago, surgeons performed the world's first successful organ transplant. To mark the anniversary, the Sun-Times asked nine people to tell their transplant stories. Today, Jessica Eveleth describes her intestine transplant. "Fortunately, my immune system hasn't rejected the transplant," Eveleth writes. "I've gotten rid of my feeding tube and can eat whatever I want. (I'm a big fan of pasta.) This fall, I'll begin my senior year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and enter the pharmacy school."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-traintes01.html

UI Alumna Named Curator of African Art In Baltimore (Baltimore Sun, Sept. 1)
An expert in African art who has lived on that continent and studied how its leaders have used the arts to promote political and economic agendas has been hired as the Baltimore Museum of Art's curator of African art. Karen Milbourne, an assistant professor of African art history at the University of Kentucky who has organized exhibitions on the healing powers of African art and on the political aspects of African-art studies, will step into her new post at the BMA Nov. 15. Milbourne, a graduate of Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania who received her Ph.D. in art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year, worked in Africa for two years researching her dissertation on the Lozi arts of Barotseland in western Zambia. Her museum experience includes collections research at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and curatorial work at the University of Kentucky Art Museum, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART, the Museum for African Art in New York, the Royal Academy in London and the Neufeld and Plass Collections of African Art at Bryn Mawr College.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/bal-to.bma01sep01,1,6698365.story?coll=bal-features-headlines

Paper Prints Correction On Conroy Story (New York Times, Sept. 1)
A report from The Associated Press in the Arts Briefing column last Wednesday about FRANK CONROY's plan to step down as director of the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa referred erroneously to alumni of the program among the last five United States poets laureate. While two of the five laureates, including the current one, Louise Glück, taught at the workshop, none (not four) are alumni.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/01/pageoneplus/corrections.html

Bush Leading in IEM (Investor's Business Daily, Aug. 31)
President Bush's stock is rising in the markets. Literally. On the smaller Iowa Electronic Markets, a market based at the Tipple School of Business at the University of Iowa, Bush's contract was quoted at $54.30 on Tuesday, compared with $46.30 for Kerry's.
Another IEM contract that follows the popular vote showed Bush with a $51.33 last-trade price. Kerry's was quoted at $49.90. The IEM began as a teaching project in 1988. The market, which receives orders online, still limits orders to $500. Iowa Markets also works with the National Science Foundation and has a nonprofit tax status. As a result, trading has been limited, less than $100,000 in trades for the two presidential election contracts. "We use it as a classroom and for research," said TOM RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. "We're designed to be accurate." The story also appeared in AFX NEWS LIMITED.
http://www.investors.com/breakingnews.asp?journalid=22897646&brk=1

Rietz Quoted In Story On Bush IEM Rise (CBS Market Watch, Aug. 31)
President Bush's stock is rising in the markets. Literally. Forward contracts tied to the outcome of the presidential election show that Bush is enjoying a convention boost, even in so-called swing states that could determine who will be the next president. On the Iowa Electronic Markets, a market based at the Tippie School of Business at the University of Iowa, Bush's contract was quoted at $54.30 on Tuesday, compared with $46.30 for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John Kerry's. Another IEM contract that follows the popular vote showed Bush with a $51.33 last-trade price. Kerry's was quoted at $49.90. During the past four elections, IEM's average forecast error has been about half that of the major polling organizations. Critics say futures markets dealing in nonfinancial commodities are simply online gambling rackets. Markets such as Intrade and TradeSports are located in Europe, where they fall under less regulatory scrutiny. "Those are set up as gambling operations," said TOM RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa. A version of the story also ran on the website of INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY.
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7B12E62D1A%2D34EF%2D489B%2DB8E8%2DA64BA26F9825%7D&siteid=mktw

Redlawsk: 2008 Candidates Should Connect Now (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 30)
To get their foot in the door in Iowa and other leadoff states early, 2008 Republican presidential hopefuls are already meeting with national convention delegates. One possible candidate, Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., addressed the Iowa Republican delegation at breakfast on Monday. He was to speak with the New Hampshire delegation Monday evening. DAVID REDLAWSK, a University of Iowa political science professor, said potential presidential candidates realize they've got to connect early "particularly when it comes to Iowa and New Hampshire." Redlawsk said Republicans can lay groundwork now without hurting any feelings because President Bush will have served his second term if he wins this election. Most observers assume Vice President Dick Cheney won't run for president in 2008, he said.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,BT_CO_20040830_005393,00.html

Fleiss: Film Showing Virus Attack Is Creepy (Sun Herald, Aug. 30)
Using a creature as hideous as any sci-fi monster, scientists have produced a one-minute horror movie starring a menacing, spidery virus swooping in on a hapless blob of bacteria. The computer-generated short arose from research that could help scientists find new ways to combat viruses that cause everything from AIDS to the common cold. With help from computer animation, the movie shows the virus latching onto an E. coli bacterium and giving it an injection of DNA that turns it into a virus factory. "It's the most detailed picture yet of how any virus attaches to a cell and what happens immediately after that to get the virus' chromosomes in," said MICHAEL FEISS, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa. Feiss said that his normally restrained microbiologist colleagues burst into applause when the film was shown at two recent scientific gatherings. He called the movie "creepy." The paper is based in Mississippi. A version of the story also appeared on the web site of KCRA CHANNEL 3 in Sacramento, Calif.;
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/nation/9536884.htm

Baron Speaks On Politics In Communities (Austin American-Statesman, Aug. 29)
The liveliest political discourse can be found in ideologically mixed communities. People are more likely to vote, and young people are more inclined to engage in politics, in places where the parties are competitive. In lopsided places, however, political minorities are less likely to speak up or vote. "It is a clear fact -- it's not even supposition any more -- that people who take minority positions are highly susceptible to a wide array of social sanctions," University of Iowa social psychologist ROBERT BARON said. It makes perfect sense that ideological minorities don't "want to stick their head out of the sand." The newspaper is based in Austin, Texas.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1ed319246f17f0fc8665683d7acc10a1&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-zSkVb&_md5=08ed15406c96df778e868402ed9a5f63

Stone Success In AMD Study Cited (Wall Street Journal, July 22)
In a discovery that illuminates the promise and the complexity of genetic research, scientists say they have identified a gene linked to age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness among the elderly. The gene is among the first to be discovered to play a role in the common form of the disease, which afflicts an estimated seven million Americans. Known as fibulin-5, the gene is part of a broader puzzle that is expected to help researchers understand how macular degeneration, or AMD, develops. That, scientists say, could lead in turn to new medicines and preventive strategies for a disease for which few effective options are on the market. The accomplishment by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reflects the increasing power of the mapping of the human genome and state-of-the-art gene-hunting technology to help unearth clues about the causes of disease in human DNA. Researchers said the finding, being reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, is pointing to new promising avenues of research. "We have a toehold on Mount Everest," says EDWIN STONE of the Center for Macular Degeneration at the University of Iowa and the lead author of the study.

 

 

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